Introducing AusVELS History 7 – 10

Report
Introducing AusVELS
History 7 – 10
Pat Hincks
5 September 2013
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Aims:
• Answer questions about history
• Outline the aims and structure and content of the
history curriculum
• Set out the historical sequence 7 – 10
• Explore the qualities of the achievement standards
• Unpack a Depth study
• Provide information on support resources:
VCAA/HTAV/Scootle
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History: Common questions
•
•
•
•
•
Is there a mandated time?
What is the status of the elaborations?
Can we ‘integrate’ history with other subjects?
Is history mandated in Years 9 and 10?
Can we mix/match Depth studies?
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History and time allocation
There is no time allocation which is mandated
for AusVELS History. However:
History F – 2 was written for 20 hours a year
History 3 – 6 was written for 40 hours a year
History 7 – 10 was written for 50 hours a year
Source: Curriculum Design Paper, ACARA,
http://www.acara.edu.au/curriculum/curriculum_design_and_development.html
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Curriculum – not pedagogy
Jurisdictions, systems and schools will be able to
implement the Australian Curriculum in ways
that value teachers’ professional knowledge,
reflect local contexts and take into account
individual students’ family, cultural and
community backgrounds. Schools and teachers
determine pedagogical and other delivery
considerations.
(Source: The Shape of the Australian Curriculum, ACARA, www.acara.edu.au )
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Humanities and Social Sciences
Curriculum
History
Geography
Civics and
Citizenship
Economics and
Business
F-2
20 hours per
year
20 hours per
year
NIL
NIL
3-4
40 hours per
year
40 hours per
year
20 hours per
year
NIL
5-6
40 hours per
year
40 hours per
year
20 hours per
year
20 hours per
year
7-8
50 hours per
year
50 hours per
year
20 hours per
year
20 hours per
year
9-10
50 hours per
year
50 hours per
year
20 hours per
year
50 hours per
year
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Rationale
Depth Studies
Knowledge and understanding
Content descriptions
Elaborations
Level descriptions
Achievement standards
Cross curriculum priorities
Aims
Skills
Overviews
Concepts
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RATIONALE:
History is a disciplined process of inquiry into the past that develops
students' curiosity and imagination. Awareness of history is an
essential characteristic of any society, and historical knowledge is
fundamental to understanding ourselves and others. It promotes the
understanding of societies, events, movements and developments that
have shaped humanity from earliest times. It helps students appreciate
how the world and its people have changed, as well as the significant
continuities that exist to the present day. History, as a discipline, has its
own methods and procedures which make it different from other ways
of understanding human experience. The study of history is based on
evidence derived from remains of the past. It is interpretative by
nature, promotes debate and encourages thinking about human
values, including present and future challenges. The process of
historical inquiry develops transferable skills, such as the ability to ask
relevant questions; critically analyse and interpret sources; consider
context; respect and explain different perspectives; develop and
substantiate interpretations, and communicate effectively.
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AIMS: The Australian Curriculum: History aims to ensure that
students develop:
• interest in, and enjoyment of, historical study for lifelong
learning and work, including their capacity and willingness
to be informed and active citizens
• knowledge, understanding and appreciation of the past and
the forces that shape societies, including Australian society
• understanding and use of historical concepts, such as
evidence, continuity and change, cause and effect,
perspectives, empathy, significance and contestability
• capacity to undertake historical inquiry, including skills in
the analysis and use of sources, and in explanation and
communication.
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History: Structure Secondary
AusVELS History
Explanations
Level Descriptions
a) Overview of the level Content
b) Key concepts of history understanding
c) Key inquiry questions
a) What will be taught at that level
b) Continuity and change, cause and
effect, perspectives, empathy and
significances, evidence, contestability
c) Inquiry questions frame teaching
and learning for that level
Content Descriptions
a) Historical knowledge and understanding
Overview
Depth Studies
b) Historical skills
Knowledge and understanding strands
are level by level
Historical skills strands in two level
bands
Overviews provide a context for the
level
Varying choice in Depth Studies
Achievement Standards
Focus on understanding and skills
Describe what students know and can
do at each level
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Level
Content
Level 7
The Ancient World
Level 8
The Ancient to the Modern World
The Level 7 curriculum provides a study of history
from the time of the earliest human communities
to the end of the ancient period, approximately
60,000BC (BCE)– c. 650AC (CE)…. a range of
societies including Australia, Egypt, Greece,
Rome, China and India.
The Level 8 curriculum provides a study of history from the
end of the ancient period to the beginning of the modern
period c650AD (CE) – 1750. …when major civilisations
around the world came into contact with each other.
Social, economic, religious and political beliefs were often
challenged and significantly changed.
Concepts of
historical
understanding
evidence, continuity and change, cause and effect, perspectives, empathy, significance and contestability
Key questions
How do we know about the ancient past?
Why and where do the first human communities
develop?
What emerged as the defining characteristics of
ancient societies?
How did societies change from the end of the ancient
period to the beginning of the modern age?
What key beliefs and values emerged and how did they
influence societies?
What were the causes and effects of contact between
societies in this period?
What have been the legacies of ancient societies?
Which significant people, groups and ideas from this period
have influenced the world today?
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Level
Content
Concepts of
historical
understanding
Key questions
Level 9
The Making of the Modern World
Level 10
The Modern World and Australia
The Level 9 curriculum provides a study of the
making of the modern world from 1750 to 1918. It
was a period of industrialisation and rapid change in
the way people lived, worked and thought. It was an
era of nationalism and imperialism and the
colonisation of Australia….culminated in WW1…
The Level 10 curriculum provides a history of the
modern world and Australia from 1918 to the present
with an emphasis on Australia in its global
context….became a critical period in Australia’s social,
cultural, economic and political development…..a time
of political turmoil, global conflict and international
cooperation…Australia’s place.
evidence, continuity and change, cause and effect, perspectives, empathy, significance and contestability
How did the nature of global conflict change during
the twentieth century?
What were the consequences of World War II?
How did these consequences shape the modern
world?
How was Australian society affected by other
significant global events and changes in this period?
How did the nature of global conflict change during
the twentieth century?
What were the consequences of World War II? How
did these consequences shape the modern world?
How was Australian society affected by other
significant global events and changes during this
period?
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Historical understanding
Underpin both strands and a particular focus in the achievement standards:
continuity and change, cause and effect, perspectives, significance, evidence
and contestability
• Can become the focus questions in teaching and learning activities
• EG. Continuity and change: What’s the same? Different? Why?
• EG Cause and effect: What motivated young Australians to go to war?
Why did the environment become a political issue in the 1970s and 80s?
What were the short term and long term causes of WWII? What impact
did Australia’s signing of the UNDR have on Australia?
• EG Perspectives: Whose viewpoint? How the same/different from others?
What shaped/ possibly shaped particular views of events, people etc.?
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Depth Studies
Level 7
Level 8
Level 9
Level 10
Depth study 1:
Investigating the Ancient
Past
Depth study 1:
Western/Islamic World
Ottoman Empire
OR Renaissance Italy
OR The Vikings
OR Medieval Europe
Depth study 1:
Making a better world?
The Industrial Revolution
OR Progressive ideas and
movements
OR Movement of peoples
Depth study 1:
World War 11
Depth study 2: The
Mediterranean World
Egypt
OR
Greece
OR
Rome
Depth study 2:
Asia-Pacific World
Angkor/Khmer Empire
OR Japan under the Shoguns
OR The Polynesian
expansion
Depth study 2:
Australia and Asia
Asia and the World
OR Making a nation
Depth study 2:
Rights and Freedoms
Depth study 3:
World War 1
Depth study 3:
The globalising world
Popular culture
OR Migration experiences
OR The environment
movement
Depth study 3:
The Asian World
India
OR
China
Depth Study 3:
Expanding contacts
Mongol expansion
OR The Black Death
OR The Spanish conquest of
the Americas
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Elaborations
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Skills
7-8
9 - 10
Chronology, terms and concepts
Sequence historical events, developments and periods
Use historical terms and concepts
Use chronological sequencing to demonstrate the relationship between
events and developments in different periods and places
Use historical terms and concepts
Historical questions and research
Identify a range of questions about the past to inform an historical
inquiry
Identify and locate relevant sources, using ICT and other methods
Identify and select different kinds of questions about the past to inform
an historical inquiry
Evaluate and enhance those questions
Identify and locate relevant sources, using ICT and other methods
Analysis and use of sources
Identify the origin and purpose of primary and secondary sources
Locate, compare, select and use information from a range of sources
as evidence
Draw conclusions about the usefulness of sources
Identify the origin, purpose and context of primary and secondary
sources
Process and synthesise information from a range of sources for use as
evidence in an historical argument
Evaluate the reliability and usefulness of primary and secondary
sources
Perspectives and interpretations
Identify and describe points of view, attitudes and values in primary
and secondary sources
Identify and analyse the perspectives of people from the past
Identify and analyse different historical interpretations ( including their
own)
Explanation and communication
Develop texts, particularly descriptions and explanations that use
evidence from a range of sources that are acknowledged
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Develop texts, particularly descriptions and discussions that use
evidence from a range of sources that are referenced
Achievement standards
• Level by level
• Two paragraphs 1) understanding 2) skills
• Designed to answer the question: What do I want
students to understand and be able to do at this
year level?
• Used with the content descriptions to plan
curriculum. The Knowledge and understanding
and Skills strands provide the content that allows
students to reach the standards.
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Level 8 Achievement Standard
By the end of Level 8, students recognise and explain patterns of change and
continuity over time. They explain the causes and effects of events and
developments. They identify the motives and actions of people at the time.
Students explain the significance of individuals and groups and how they were
influenced by the beliefs and values of their society. They describe different
interpretations of the past.
Students sequence events and developments within a chronological framework
with reference to periods of time. When researching, students develop
questions to frame an historical inquiry. They analyse, select and organise
information from primary and secondary sources and use it as evidence to
answer inquiry questions. Students identify and explain different points of view
in sources. When interpreting sources, they identify their origin and purpose,
and distinguish between fact and opinion. Students develop texts, particularly
descriptions and explanations, incorporating analysis. In developing these texts,
and organising and presenting their findings, they use historical terms and
concepts, evidence identified in sources, and acknowledge their sources of
information
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Mixing Depth Studies
The content in each elective is designed to allow
detailed study of specific aspects of the historical
period. The order and detail in which content is
taught is a programming decision. Content may be
integrated in ways appropriate to the specific local
context; and it may be integrated with the content
of other depth-study electives.
http://ausvels.vcaa.vic.edu.au/The-Humanities-History/Overview/Content-structure
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Depth Studies
•
Rights and freedoms (1945 – the present)
– The origins and significance of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, including Australia’s
involvement in the development of the declaration (ACDSEH023)
– Background to the struggle of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples for rights and
freedoms before 1965, including the 1938 Day of Mourning and the Stolen Generations
(ACDSEH104)
– The US civil rights movement and its influence on Australia (ACDSEH105)
– The significance of the following for the civil rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
peoples: 1962 right to vote federally; 1967 Referendum; Reconciliation; Mabo decision;
Bringing Them Home Report (the Stolen Generations), the Apology (ACDSEH106)
– Methods used by civil rights activists to achieve change for Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander peoples, and the role of ONE individual or group in the struggle (ACDSEH134)
– The continuing nature of efforts to secure civil rights and freedoms in Australia and
throughout the world, such as the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (2007)
(ACDSEH143)
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Level 10 Achievement Standard
By the end of Level 10, students refer to key events, the actions of individuals and
groups, and beliefs and values to explain patterns of change and continuity over time.
They analyse the causes and effects of events and developments and explain their
relative importance. They explain the context for people’s actions in the past. Students
explain the significance of events and developments from a range of perspectives.
They explain different interpretations of the past and recognise the evidence used to
support these interpretations.
Students sequence events and developments within a chronological framework, and
identify relationships between events across different places and periods of time.
When researching, students develop, evaluate and modify questions to frame an
historical inquiry. They process, analyse and synthesise information from a range of
primary and secondary sources and use it as evidence to answer inquiry questions.
Students analyse sources to identify motivations, values and attitudes. When
evaluating these sources, they analyse and draw conclusions about their usefulness,
taking into account their origin, purpose, and context. They develop and justify their
own interpretations about the past. Students develop texts, particularly explanations
and discussions, incorporating historical argument. In developing these texts and
organising and presenting their arguments, they use historical terms and concepts,
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evidence identified in sources, and they reference these sources.
One approach
Focus
Assessment Task
Elements of the Achievement Standards
The 1967
Referendum
Source analysis
Students:
explain the significance of events and
developments from a range of perspectives.
explain different interpretations of the past
analyse sources to identify motivations, values
and attitudes
use historical terms and concepts
The Mabo
Decision
Research report on
significance
process, analyse and synthesise information from
a range of primary and secondary sources and
use it as evidence to answer inquiry questions.
develop and justify their own interpretations
about the past
they use historical terms and concepts, evidence
identified in sources, and they reference these
sources.
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Examples of a Sequence
Examples of activities
What rights should all Australian citizens
expect?
Analysis of rights in the United Nations Declaration of
Human Rights
How do these rights compare with those of
Aborigines in the 1960s?
Some explanations/ analysis of Rights of Aborigines in
States and Territories
Life in Missions and reserves
Stolen Generations stories
What’s a referendum?
Construct a flowchart of referendum process.
Explain implications of sections 51 and 127 of Constitution
Who led the campaign?
Views and achievements of Aboriginal activists and
supporters ( eg Doug Nicholls and the MCG.)
What did the Referendum leaflets, songs,
posters, slogans say?
Analysis of :
Values and attitudes
Arguments and evidence
What was the result?
Analysis of results State by state.
How significant?
Views of Aborigines ( eg Faith Bandler) Other perspectives
( eg Federal Government action)
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AusVELS Resources and Support
http://www.vcaa.vic.edu.au/Pages/foundation1
0/curriculum/index.aspx
General advice and FAQs etc
Under History menu
• Summaries of differences between AusVELS
and VELS
• Planning templates
• Progression Points
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Progression point examples
• Assist teachers in the assessment and reporting of student achievement.
• In AusVELS, the progression point examples are provided in 0.5 increments.
Progression point examples are
designed to:
Progression point examples are NOT
designed to:
• illustrate how a student might show
evidence of progression
• be used in conjunction with other
tools such as annotated student work
samples
• be modified by schools so that the
examples reflect the curriculum
structure and timing of when
knowledge and skills are taught and
assessed
• replace standards
• be used as a definitive or mandated
set of progression measures for
student assessment
• be the only resource used by teachers
to assign progression points on
student reports
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Select aspect
of content
descriptions
Develop assessment tasks
that will allow students to
demonstrate aspects of
achievement standards
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Do all students in Years 9-10 have to study the Australian
Curriculum/AusVELS?
The Victorian Minister for Education has endorsed the
implementation of the Australian Curriculum for English,
Mathematics, History and Science in Victorian schools F-10
from 2013. There is therefore now an expectation that all
students will have access to the content defined by the
curriculum for these subject across the years F–10 and that,
for most students, their program of learning will include
assessment of their learning of this content. Exceptions might
include students who are following individual learning plans,
students undertaking school-based apprenticeships or
students undertaking VCE studies in Year 10.
http://www.vcaa.vic.edu.au/Pages/foundation10/curriculum/faq.aspx#9_10
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Can we ‘integrate’ content?
• Yes, but we are not re-creating SOSE!
• Curriculum content can be meaningfully put
together based on a particular context or
theme.
• Eg: Obvious links with Geography, Civics and
Citizenship, Economics.
• Eg: text selection in English such as ‘A Long
Way Home’, ‘Saroo Brierly’ and ‘Immigration’.
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HTAV
School/network based PD ( Jo Clyne, Education
Officer)
Primary and Secondary Resources: Login>
Members only> Resources
http://www.htav.asn.au/home
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Additional resources
• http://www.historyteacher.org.au/
• www.scootle.edu.au
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History: Common questions
•
•
•
•
•
Is there a mandated time?
What is the status of the elaborations?
Can we ‘integrate’ history with other subjects?
Is history mandated in Years 9 and 10?
Can we mix/match Depth studies?
32
Victorian Curriculum and Assessment
Authority (VCAA)
www.vcaa.vic.edu.au
Pat Hincks
Humanities and Social Sciences Curriculum
Manager
[email protected]
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