VOCABULARY - hillsideengknhlish

Report
VOCABULARY
WEEK FOUR
GLUT
(V.) (N.)
V. To provide more than is needed or
wanted; to feed or fill to the point of
overstuffing.
N. An oversupply
INCOGNITO
(ADJ.) ( N.)
Adj. In a disguised state, under an assumed
name
N. The state of being disguised or a person
in disguise
INVALIDATE
(V.)
V. To make valueless, take away all force or
effect
LEGENDARY
(ADJ)
Adj. Described in well-known stories;
existing in old stories (legends) rather than
in real life
MAIM
To cripple, disable
(V.)
MINIMIZE
(V.)
To make as small as possible, make the least
of; to make smaller than before
OBLIQUE
(Adj) Slanting or sloping; not
straightforward or direct
(ADJ.)
VEER
(V.)
To change direction or course, turn aside,
shift
VENERATE (V.)
To regard with reverence, look up to with
respect
WANTON
(ADJ) (N)
Adj. Reckless; heartless, unjustifiable; loose
in morals
N. A spoiled, pampered person; one with
low morals
THIS WEEK’S WORDS
GLUT
INCOGNITO
INVALIDATE
LEGENDARY
MAIM
MINIMIZE
OBLIQUE
VEER
VENERATE
WANTON
SYNONYMS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Rash; malicious, spiteful
To injure, cripple; to mar, disfigure, mutilate
To worship, revere, idolize
In disguise, under an assumed identity
To belittle, downplay, underrate
1. Wanton; 2. Maim; 3. Venerate; 4. Incognito; 5. Minimize
SYNONYMS
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
To take away value
Slanted, diagonal; indirect
To swerve, change course suddenly
To flood, inundate; a surplus, plethora
Mythical, fabulous; famous, celebrated
6. invalidate; 7. oblique; 8. veer; 9. glut; 10. legendary
ANTONYMS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
A shortage, scarcity, dearth, paucity
To support, confirm; legalize
To magnify, enlarge, exaggerate
Direct, straight to the point,
To move ahead in a straight line,
stay on course
1. glut; 2. invalidate; 3. minimize; 4. oblique; 5. veer
ANTONYMS
6. To despise, detest; to ridicule, deride
7. Undisguised
8. Justified; morally strict; responsible
9. To enable; make better
10. Unknown; describing a nobody
6. Venerate; 7. Incognito; 8. Wanton; 9. Maim; 10. Legendary
USING THE WORDS
IN A SENTENCE
1. We were shocked by their (bountiful, wanton) misuse
of the money their parents had left them.
2. Sally’s speech would have been better if she stayed
with her main idea instead of (bantering, veering) off
to side issues.
3. Why do you suppose someone whose face is known
all over the world would want to travel (obliquely,
incognito)?
4. I didn’t want Charlotte to know that I was watching
her, but occasionally I managed to steal a few
(oblique, legendary) glances at her.
USING THE WORDS
IN A SENTENCE
1. We were shocked by their (bountiful, wanton) misuse
of the money their parents had left them.
2. Sally’s speech would have been better if she stayed
with her main idea instead of (bantering, veering) off
to side issues.
3. Why do you suppose someone whose face is known
all over the world would want to travel (obliquely,
incognito)?
4. I didn’t want Charlotte to know that I was watching
her, but occasionally I managed to steal a few
(oblique, legendary) glances at her.
USING THE WORDS
IN A SENTENCE
5. Children may be (maimed, avowed) in spirit as well
as in body if they do not have a secure and loving
home environment.
6. Although I love sports, I sometimes feel that
television is becoming (glutted, invalidated) with
athletic events of all kinds.
7. Because of Bob’s repeated traffic violations, his
driver’s license has been (congested, invalidated).
USING THE WORDS
IN A SENTENCE
5. Children may be (maimed, glutted) in spirit as well
as in body if they do not have a secure and loving
home environment.
6. Although I love sports, I sometimes feel that
television is becoming (glutted, invalidated) with
athletic events of all kinds.
7. Because of Bob’s repeated traffic violations, his
driver’s license has been (congested, invalidated).
USING THE WORDS
IN A SENTENCE
8. The (legendary, wanton) deeds of Sherlock Holmes
are so well known that many people think he really
lived.
9. I will not try to (minimize, banter) the difficulties we
face, but I am sure that we can overcome them by
working together.
10. The mad Roman emperor Caligula believed that he
was a god and expected us to (venerate, minimize)
him as much.
USING THE WORDS
IN A SENTENCE
8. The (legendary, wanton) deeds of Sherlock Holmes
are so well known that many people think he really
lived.
9. I will not try to (minimize, venerate) the difficulties
we face, but I am sure that we can overcome them by
working together.
10. The mad Roman emperor Caligula believed that he
was a god and expected to (venerate, minimize) him
as much.

similar documents