CONSTRUCTION BLUEPRINT READING

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CONSTRUCTION BLUEPRINT READING
SYMBOLS AND ABBREVIATIONS
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CONSTRUCTION BLUEPRINT READING
As a technician on a construction site you will need
to be familiar with all of the symbols and
abbreviations used on the blueprints as they pertain
to your trade.
It’s just as important to know the electrical symbols
as it is to know the low voltage symbols, low voltage
outlets are typically placed close to electrical outlets.
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CONSTRUCTION BLUEPRINT READING
You will need to locate the legend page in the set of
blueprints you are working with.
The legend defines all of the symbols and
abbreviations that the architectural firm is using
throughout all of the plans.
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CONSTRUCTION BLUEPRINT READING
Symbols are defined at the beginning of a set of
blueprints, there is typically several pages dedicated
to identifying all the symbols used on all of the
drawings.
Though most of the symbols are standardized
architectural firms will have their own variation of
common and not so common symbols.
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CONSTRUCTION BLUEPRINT READING
The abbreviations used on a set of blueprints will
also be located at the front of the drawings and have
several pages dedicated to defining all the
abbreviations used throughout the drawings.
In some cases the symbol and abbreviation sheets
may be located in front of the specific drawings, for
example all of the electrical symbols may be on sheet
E-1 and E-2 may contain all of the abbreviations.
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CONSTRUCTION BLUEPRINT READING
Here is an example
of an electrical
legend, this appears
on the same page of
the electrical
drawings which is
typical for small
projects.
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CONSTRUCTION BLUEPRINT READING
Plug outlets are standardized and are depicted the same from
drawing to drawing, sometimes there’s a slight variation.
PLUG OUTLETS
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CONSTRUCTION BLUEPRINT READING
ELECTRICAL OUTLETS
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CONSTRUCTION BLUEPRINT READING
LIGHTS, these too are fairly standard
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CONSTRUCTION BLUEPRINT READING
Switch symbols are also relatively standard.
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CONSTRUCTION BLUEPRINT READING
Here are the most commonly used symbols for
communications.
PRIMARY SYMBOL
USED FOR CAMERA
LOCATIONS
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CONSTRUCTION BLUEPRINT READING
COMMUNICATIONS OUTLETS
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CONSTRUCTION BLUEPRINT READING
Below are some more electrical outlets, notice that
the triangle is used for special purpose outlets, in
some cases you have to pay special attention to the
letter subscripts that are used with each symbol.
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CONSTRUCTION BLUEPRINT READING
Here are some more
electrical symbols,
notice that the switch
symbol is a little
different here than it was
in a previous slide.
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CONSTRUCTION BLUEPRINT READING
Here are the
emergency lights
and exit lights
symbols as well as
the different types
of fluorescent
light symbols.
All telecom cables
must be kept away
from fluorescent
lights.
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CONSTRUCTION BLUEPRINT READING
Additional
low voltage
outlets;
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CONSTRUCTION BLUEPRINT READING
This is an example of 5 outlets, and a light tied to a
switch and all tied to the same circuit.
What does the circle with the SD and T stand for?
SMOKE DETECTOR
THERMOSTAT
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CONSTRUCTION BLUEPRINT READING
In this same example the voice and data locations do
not have connecting lines, why?
ALL COMMUNICATIONS CABLES ARE HOMERUNS TO A TC
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CONSTRUCTION BLUEPRINT READING
Symbols used in
security alarm and
access control are
not standardized,
however a common
practice is to use a
box or rectangle with
the abbreviation of
the device.
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CONSTRUCTION BLUEPRINT READING
Here are some
examples of
fire alarm
symbols that
are commonly
used on blueprints.
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CONSTRUCTION BLUEPRINT READING
Commonly used
plumbing symbols
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CONSTRUCTION BLUEPRINT READING
You’ve probably noticed that the symbols themselves
have abbreviations, in many cases the same symbol
or shape is used with a different abbreviation.
In the following slides we’ll take a look at some of
the most commonly used abbreviations used on
electrical drawings.
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CONSTRUCTION BLUEPRINT READING
BLUEPRINT ABBREVIATIONS
ADA AHUAFFAWGCLEGELEVEM –
EMT-
AMERICAN DISABILITY ACT
AIR HANDLING UNIT
ABOVE FINISHED FLOOR
AMERICAN WIRE GUAGE
CENTER LINE
EARTH GROUND
ELEVATION
EMERGENCY
ELECTRICAL METALLIC TUBING
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CONSTRUCTION BLUEPRINT READING
MDFMAIN DISTRIBUTION FRAME
FOBFACE OF BRICK
GD/GND- GROUND
MICMICROPHONE
M.H.MANHOLE
NCNORMALLY CLOSED
NONORMALLY OPEN
OCON CENTER
PBPUSH BUTTON
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CONSTRUCTION BLUEPRINT READING
PBXRFI SPKTYP TELERTU UWP“‘-
PRIVATE BRANCH EXCHANGE
REQUEST FOR INFORMATION
SPEAKER
TYPICAL
TELEPHONE
ROOF TOP UNIT
UNDERGROUND
WEATHER PROOF
INCHES
FEET
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CONSTRUCTION BLUEPRINT READING
Anything that has the “ADA” designation is a call
out that certain height requirements must be
followed.
For low voltage technicians this means all public
access devices must be ADA compliant, that means
the mounting height is 46” (see the handout on
ADAAG, Americans with disabilities act
accessibility guidelines; 4.31.3).
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CONSTRUCTION BLUEPRINT READING
Another common abbreviation that you will see on
blueprints is “AFF” (above finished floor).
This is a reference to the mounting height of outlets
(voice & data) and other low voltage devices.
Typical mounting heights are 18” AFF on center.
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CONSTRUCTION BLUEPRINT READING
For a more detailed list of abbreviations used on
blueprints refer to the symbols and abbreviation hand
out.
Remember that in many cases the low voltage
systems are typically superimposed onto the
electrical drawings so you will be referencing “E”
drawings the majority of the time.
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