Shurley Grammar Unit 1

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Shurley Grammar
Unit 1
Sixth Grade
Lesson 5
• Today we will learn about synonyms and
antonyms.
• Synonyms are words that have almost the same
meaning.
• Examples: held and aid, quick and fast, weak and
feeble
• Antonyms are words that have opposite
meanings.
• Examples: quick and slow, busy and idle, bright
and dull, hot and cold.
Lesson 5
• What are words with almost the same
meaning?
• synonyms
• What are words with opposite meanings?
• antonyms
• What is a synonym for quick?
• fast
• What is an antonym for quick?
• slow
Identifying Synonyms and Antonyms
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Identify the words as synonyms or antonyms.
cold, frigid
synonyms
peace, turmoil
antonyms
deny, reject
synonyms
Identifying Synonyms and Antonyms
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Identify the words as synonyms or antonyms.
low, elevated
antonyms
question, inquiry
synonyms
building, edifice
synonyms
Sentence Jingle
5 Parts of a Sentence
• A complete sentence is a group of words that
has a subject, a verb, and expresses a
complete thought.
• A complete sentence should also begin with a
capital letter and end with an end mark.
Noun Jingle
Verb Jingle
4 Kinds of Sentences
• There are four kinds of sentences: declarative,
imperative, interrogative, and exclamatory.
• These sentences have four purposes: to tell, to
ask, to request, or to show strong feeling.
4 Kinds of Sentences
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A declarative sentence makes a statement.
It is labeled with a D.
Example: Mr. Henry is a very good mechanic.
(period, statement, declarative sentence)
An imperative sentence gives a command.
It is labeled with an Imp.
Example: Put the groceries in the pantry.
(period, command, imperative sentence)
4 Kinds of Sentences
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An interrogative sentence asks a question.
It is labeled with an Int.
Example: Do you have an extra pencil?
(question mark, question, interrogative sentence)
An exclamatory sentence expresses strong feeling.
It is labeled with an E.
Example: Someone stop that thief!
(exclamation point, strong feeling, exclamatory
sentence)
Question and Answer Flow
• Understanding how all the parts of a sentence
work together makes writing sentences easier
and more interesting.
• Learning how to ask the right questions to get
answers will help you identify the parts of a
sentence.
• The questions you ask and the answers you
get are called the question and answer flow.
Nouns
• The definition says that a noun is a person,
place, thing, or idea.
• A subject question is used to find the noun
that works as the subject in the sentence.
• The subject tells who or what the sentence is
about.
• The subject questions are who or what.
• Ask who if the sentence is about people.
• Ask what if the sentence is not about people.
Sentence 1
• Plane circled.
• What circled? plane—subject noun (write SN
above plane)
• Since plane is a thing, we ask the subject
question using what.
• The subject noun plane tells what the
sentence is about.
Verbs
• The verb definition says that the verb can
show action or state of being.
• The verb tells what the subject is doing.
• To find the verb, ask what is being said about
the subject.
• What is being said about plane? plane
circled—verb (write V above circled)
Lesson 8
Plane circled.
Lesson 8
Girl danced.
Lesson 8
Wolf limped.
Lesson 8
Bulls bellowed!
Adverb Jingle
Adverbs
• An adverb modifies a verb, adjective, or
another adverb.
• The adverb questions are How? When? And
Where?
• The adverb label is Adv.
Adjective Jingle
Adjectives
• An adjective modifies a noun or a pronoun.
• Adjective questions are What kind? Which
one? How many?
• The adjective label is Adj.
Adjectives and Adverbs Modify
• The adjective and adverb definitions use the
word modifies.
• Modify means to describe.
• When the adverb definition says that an
adverb modifies a verb, it means that an
adverb describes a verb.
• When the adjective definition says that an
adjective modifies a noun, it means that an
adjective describes a noun.
Classifying Sentences with Adverbs
The jet plane circled awkwardly above.
What circled awkwardly above? plane—subject noun
What is being said about plane? plane circled—verb
Now we are going to answer some questions that
will help us identify the adverbs.
1. Where do you find an adverb?
to the verb, adjective, or another adverb
2. Where do you go first to find a an adverb?
to the verb
3. What is the verb in this sentence?
circled
Classifying Sentences with Adverbs
The jet plane circled awkwardly above.
What circled awkwardly above? plane—subject noun
What is being said about plane? plane circled—verb
4. What do you ask after you go to the verb
circled?
one of the adverb questions: how? when?
where?
5. Which adverb question would you use to find
the adverb in this sentence?
how?
Classifying Sentences with Adverbs
The jet plane circled awkwardly above.
What circled awkwardly above? plane—subject noun
What is being said about plane? plane circled—verb
Circled how? awkwardly—adverb (write
Adv above awkwardly)
Circled where? above—adverb (write Adv
above awkwardly)
Classifying Sentences with Adjectives
• Page 41
Article Adjective
• Insert pattern and complete subject/predicate
page 43
Lesson 8
The jet plane circled
awkwardly above.
Lesson 8
A little girl danced gracefully.
Lesson 8
The injured wolf limped
slowly away.
Lesson 8
The delightful children performed
perfectly.
Lesson 8
Several angry bulls bellowed
loudly!
Singular and Plural Nouns
• A singular noun represents one person, place,
thing, or idea.
• Plural nouns represent more than one person,
place, thing, or idea.
• Plural nouns usually end in s or es.
Common and Proper Nouns
• A common noun is a noun that means ANY
person, place, or thing.
• A common noun is not capitalized, because it
does not name a special person, place, or
thing.
• A proper noun is a noun that names a special
or particular person, place, or thing.
• Proper nouns are always capitalized no matter
where they are found in the sentence.
Simple Subject and Predicate
• A simple subject is another name for the
subject noun or subject pronoun.
• The simple subject is just the subject, without
all the words that modify the subject.
• The simple predicate is another name for the
verb.
• The simple predicate is just the verb, without
all the rest of the words in the predicate.
• Insert script for adverb exception and natural
or inverted order. Page 52
Lesson 11
The big ugly snake slithered
quickly away.
Lesson 11
A small girl quietly whimpered
nearby.
Lesson 11
Yesterday the nimble little
monkeys
climbed very rapidly.
Lesson 11
The extremely polite usher nodded
graciously.
Parts of Speech
• All the words in the English language have
been put into eight groups called the Parts of
Speech.
• How a word is used in a sentence determines
its part of speech.
• The sentences we’ve been classifying have
utilized four of the parts of speech: noun,
verb, adjective, and adverb.
• Insert Practice Sentences script pages 61-62
• Insert Improved Sentences script pages 63-64
The Preposition Jingle
Object of the Prep Jingle
Preposition
• A preposition is a joining word.
• A preposition joins a noun or a pronoun to the
rest of the sentence.
• To know whether a word is a preposition, say
the preposition word and ask what or whom.
• If the answer is a noun or a pronoun, then the
word is a preposition.
• Prepositions are labeled with a P.
Object of the Preposition
• An object of the preposition is a noun or a
pronoun after the preposition in a sentence.
• An object of the preposition is labeled with an
OP.
Preposition or Adverb
• A word can be a preposition or an adverb,
depending on how it is used in a sentence.
• For example, the word down can be a
preposition or an adverb.
• If down is used alone, with no noun after it, it
is an adverb.
• If down has a noun after it that answers the
question what or whom, then down is a
preposition, and the noun after down is the
object of the preposition.

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