ICC April 2010 PowerPoint

Report
Iowa Core Curriculum Session 3
April 2010
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http://meetingwords.com/ICC4_2010
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You Gotta Have Goals
Characteristics of Effective
Instruction and Assessment
Student Engagement & Learning
S
A
T
4
T
R
Characteristics of Effective
Instruction and Assessment
Student Engagement & Learning
S
A
Student
Assessment
Centered
T
Teaching
for
Understanding
5
for
Learning
T
R
Rigor
&
Relevance
Teaching
for Learner
Differences
CEI Innovation Configuration Maps
Activity



Divide the 5 Characteristics of Effective
Instruction innovation configuration maps
within your 5 person base team. Each person
will become an expert on one characteristic.
Read the assigned map and highlight important
information.
Determine the evidence you would need, to
justify a learning level on the innovation
configuration map.
4 Corners and the Center



Go to the corner (or center) that matches
your CEI
Discuss with those that investigated the
same CEI
As a group determine evidence you would
need or observe
What do you see?
Cognitively Guided Instruction
Debrief



Using the innovation configuration map for
your Characteristic of Effective Instruction,
determine where this lesson would “rate”
With your 4 Corners and a Center expert
group share your rating and the evidence
you have to support this rating
Now share your learning with your base
group, discuss how these maps could be
used with local school staff
CGI in Iowa



The Iowa Department of Education has
supported a state-wide CGI initiative since
June 2005.
There are currently 18 Iowa-based CGI
leaders who have been trained through this
initiative.
Over 400 teachers and teacher leaders in
Iowa have participated in this initiative.
CGI in Northwest AEA


There are currently 2 Northwest AEA based
leaders who have been trained through this
initiative– Janelle Schorg and Denise Spieler
About 25 teachers have participated in this
initiative.
What is CGI?
Cognitively Guided Instruction is a teacher
professional development program that helps
teachers understand how children think
about mathematics.
In A CGI Classroom:





Teachers pose problems to children without first showing the
children how to solve the problem.
Children solve problems using their own strategies.
Children share their mathematical thinking with the teacher and
with other children.
Teacher observe and listen to children as they solve problems
to assess individual children’s mathematical understanding.
Teachers use information about children’s mathematical
understanding to plan instructional moves and to choose further
problems.
In CGI Professional Development:

Teachers learn how elementary school children think
about mathematics.

Teachers increase their knowledge of mathematics
through the study of children’s thinking.

Teachers focus on number, operation and the
algebra underlying number and operation.

Teachers are supported in developing their own
approach to teaching math for understanding.
Summary of CGI research results
CGI Classrooms

Students in CGI classrooms spend more
time engaged in problem solving than
students in non-CGI classrooms.

Students in CGI classrooms spend more time
talking about their mathematical ideas
than students in non-CGI classrooms.
Summary of CGI Research Results
Characteristics of Teachers

CGI Teachers have greater knowledge of their
students’ thinking than non-CGI teachers.

CGI Teachers have greater knowledge of children’s
mathematics than non-CGI teachers.

CGI Teachers have greater knowledge of
mathematics than non-CGI teachers.
http://meetingwords.com/ICC4_2010
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Right On Target!
Timeframe
Process
10 minutes
(5 minutes for each school)
•Present “work in progress” and state
any focus for feedback
•Teams ask each other clarifying
questions
20 minutes
•Review each other’s plans
•Provide specific feedback on post-it
notes
•Post feedback on posters
20 minutes
(10 minutes for each school)
•Each school will review the feedback
they received and ask the reviewing
team clarifying questions.
5 minutes
•Each team will summarize the
feedback they received and how it will
move them forward in planning
Guiding Questions
Peer Review Partners
Cherokee Site
Alta
Aurelia
Ar-We-Va
St. Catherine-St. Mary’s
Cherokee
River Valley
Denison
Odebolt-Arthur-Battle Creek-Ida
Grove
Marcus-Meriden-Cleghorn
South O’Brien
Spalding Catholic
St. Rose of Lima
http://meetingwords.com/ICC4_2010
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A Case Example


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A tool is under development that may be used for
summative self reporting
– Iowa Curriculum Alignment Toolkit (I-CAT)
–
Web-based application
–
Not required to use
–
Meets all requirements for the summative self
reporting, and will extend beyond that in the future
What follows is a description of how the I-CAT and
supporting processes work
1/21/10
ICC Network Meeting
Major I-CAT Activities
Activity
Time Commitment
1. District and/or building
leadership planning with AEA
staff
2. Enter participating teachers
and courses to be rated into ICAT
3. Teacher training
Minimum of one to two
hours
4. Initial data entry
(immediately follows #3)
5. Planning next steps
Approximately 90 minutes
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Varies depending on
number of participating
teachers and courses
Approximately 90 minutes
Minimum of one to two
hours
Major Activity #1: Planning

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Preparing for training and use of I-CAT involves
meeting with those responsible for curriculum
decisions and/or building-level administrator
–
Plan for engaging in professional development and use
of I-CAT
–
Support for the work
–
Vision/purpose of work
–
Expectations for administrators, teachers, and AEA staff
–
How a plan will be developed to use alignment data for
decision making
Major Activity #2: Setting Up I-CAT
1.
Make sure I-CAT can connect to staff
information system (e.g., PeopleBox)
–
–
–
–
2.
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Names of teachers and administrators
Building(s) they are in (name and state ID#)
Email address
Title/Position
Once connected, choose teachers who will
use I-CAT for summative self reporting
Major Activity #3: Teacher Training

Training and data entry
–
–
–
District/building leadership physically present,
part of planning and training
Uses a “just-in-time” approach
Training objectives: Participants will be able to
Develop a common understanding of curriculum and
alignment concepts and terms
2. Explain the implementation outcome for alignment
3. Explain the purpose of the alignment process
4. Learn how to and enter data
1.
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I-CAT
Major Activity #4: Data Entry
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
Occurs immediately following training
(i.e., same day, with administrators and
facilitators present)

Teachers will be able to enter data on
their own as well since I-CAT is webbased
Major Activity #5: Follow Up to Data
Entry

Some things to consider for developing a plan
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
Determine how frequently data should be collected
Determine who else may need to be involved in the
future
Determine how enacted curriculum data connect
with local curriculum efforts (e.g., curriculum cycles)
Facilitate conversations among teachers and
administrators about alignment data
Use alignment data to help develop a plan to
address any misalignment that exists
Use self study 4.c.2 rating to
determine systems progress
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I-CAT: Summative Self Report
Demonstration

Demonstration of the following
1.
2.

While observing the demonstration, note the
following
1.
2.
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Online data entry interface (beta version)
Data output, display, and analysis options
How could these tools and data be used to help
districts engage in Outcome 4 work?
How could these tools and data be used to help
districts determine what is taught and where it is
taught?
Data Display
•
•
Percent alignment between what is
taught and the Essential Concepts/Skill
Sets is displayed
Different levels of analysis reveal
different degrees of alignment
3
2
Data Display
•
•
The Essential Concepts/Skill Sets taught and not taught are
indicated in a table with “Yes” and “No”
Yellow highlights the “No” designations
3
3
Data Display
•
•
•
•
Percent alignment between what is taught and the Details within each
Essential Concepts/Skill Sets is displayed
0% means no Details taught for that Essential Concept/Skill Set
100% means all Details taught for that Essential Concept/Skill Set
Everything in between means some but not all Details taught
3
4
Data Display
•
•
Line-by-line summary of alignment between what is taught and
the Details within each Essential Concepts/Skill Sets is displayed
3
Details taught designated by “x,” not taught highlighted yellow
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Data Display
•
•
•
Courses can all be analyzed side by side by frequently taken course
sequences
Line-by-line summary of alignment between what is taught and the Details
within each Essential Concepts/Skill Sets is displayed
3
Details taught designated by “x,” not taught highlighted yellow
6
Some Things to Consider Next

Questions
–
–
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Does your school already use tools that will allow
a comprehensive look at enacted-to-intended
alignment?
How could these data be used?
Implementation Plan and Self Study
Electronic Submission

http://www.iowa.gov/educate/index.php?optio
n=com_content&task=view&id=674&Itemid=
1023
http://meetingwords.com/ICC4_2010
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Dates for Sessions Next Year

Session 1
–

October 26, 27, and 28
Session 2
–
March 29, 30, and 31
Peer Review Partners
Sioux City Site
Akron-Westfield
West Monona
Bishop Heelan
Sioux City CSD
Charter Oak-Ute
St. Paul’s Lutheran
Hinton
Sergeant Bluff-Luton Team 1
Maple Valley Anthon Oto
Lawton-Bronson
Westwood
Sergeant Bluff-Luton Team 2
Peer Review Partners
Sioux Center Site
Boyden-Hull
Sioux Center
Central Lyon
Remsen-Union
Gehlen Catholic
Spalding Catholic
St. Patrick’s
George-Little Rock
Sheldon
Hull Christian
Ireton Christian
Inwood Christian
Rock Valley Christian
Ireton Christian
Sioux Center Christian
Le Mars
Rock Valley
MOC-FV (Team 1?)
Sibley-Ocheyedan
Orange City Christian
Sanborn Christian
West Lyon
Sheldon or MOC-FV Team 2

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