BANAC_CIL_Draft II - The Child, Youth and Family Services

Report
•
In Canada, Aboriginal is understood to mean a category that includes First Nation, Métis
and Inuit (FNMI) people. The National Household Survey (NHS) shows 1,400,685
Aboriginal people in 2011, representing 4.3% of the population. In 2006, we accounted
for 3.8% of the population census.
•
It also shows that the FNMI population increased by 232,385 people, or 20.1% between
2006 and 2011, compared with 5.2% for the non-Aboriginal population.
•
In Ontario, 37.0% of First Nations people with registered Indian status lived on a reserve
and 63% living in rural and urban centres.
•
In 2011, 451,795 people identified as Métis. They represented 32.3% of the total
Aboriginal population and 1.4% of the total Canadian population. In Ontario (86,015),
where they represented 19.0% of all Métis with 10.0% of the population from Midland .
•
In 2011, 59,445 people identified as Inuit. They represented 4.2% of the total Aboriginal
population and 0.2% of the total Canadian population.
•
Ontario was the province where the largest number of Aboriginal people lived, 301,425
people, representing 21.5% of the total Aboriginal population.
The Aboriginal population is young
Aboriginal children aged 14 and under made up
28.0% of the total Aboriginal population and 7.0%
of all children in Canada. Non-Aboriginal children
aged 14 and under represented 16.5% of the total
non-Aboriginal population.
Aboriginal youth aged 15 to 24 represented
18.2% of the total Aboriginal population, and 5.9% of all
youth in Canada. Non-Aboriginal youth accounted for
12.9% of the total non-Aboriginal population.
About 6% of the total Aboriginal population were
seniors aged 65 and over, less than half of the proportion
of seniors in the non-Aboriginal population (14.2%).
Inuit had a median age of 23, the youngest of the three
Aboriginal groups. The median age of First Nations
people was 26, followed by Métis at 31, 13 years
younger than the median of 41 years for the nonAboriginal population.
Living arrangements of children
Less than half (45%) of First Nations children live with both parents
37.1% (96,045) lived in a lone–parent family, and 8.7% (22,445) lived in
a stepfamily as stepchildren.
Almost 8,500 First Nations children (3.3%) were not living with their
parents, but instead lived with one or both of their grandparents in a
skip-generation family. Additionally, 10.5% of First Nations children, or
27,100, lived in multi-generational families.
Over 11,700 First Nations children aged 14 and under (4.5%) were foster
children. First Nations children who were Registered Indians were more
likely to be in foster care than those who were not registered (5.0%
compared with 2.9%).
More than half (58%) of Métis children live with both parents, 29.8%
(31,095) lived in a lone–parent family, and 8.6% (8,935) lived in a
stepfamily as stepchildren. Just over 1,400 Métis children (1.4%) did not
live with either of their parents, but with one or both of their
grandparents. Additionally, 5.6% of Métis children, or 5,870, lived in
multi-generational families. Nearly 1,800 Métis children (1.7%) were
foster children.
About six in ten Inuit children live with both parents - one in four
(25.8%, or 5,200) lived in a lone-parent family, and 6.3% (1,280) lived in
a stepfamily as stepchildren. Almost 470 Inuit children (2.3%) lived in
skip-generation families, that is, with one or both grandparents where
no parents were present.
Census population is 416,995
The catchment area for the Barrie Area Native
Advisory Circle includes Simcoe, York and
Established network of organizations focused
Muskoka. The total Aboriginal population
on serving the FAMILY since 2001 via Simcoe
according to Stats Can 2006 is 18,045 which
includes 13,035 in Simcoe, 3,595 in York and 1,415 County Coalition
in Muskoka. The average in Simcoe is 3% which is
The Coalition is made up of 35 non-FNMI
higher than the provincial average of 2%.
The Aboriginal population includes 9,465 First
Nation, 7,900 Metis and 680 Inuit. 54% are under
age of 29 years and youth are the fastest growing
demographic.
agencies, boards & committees that impact
Aboriginal people. This includes other
planning tables such as Best Start and
Compass to name a few.
Long-established network of organizations have
focused on serving the needs of Aboriginal
families. i.e., BANAC and D’naagdawenamog
Binnoojiiyag Child & Family Services which
includes 7 FN’s from Central East catchment area.
Estrangement between Aboriginal & mainstream is beginning to change ie:
Inclusiveness/sense of Belonging is one of the
Coalition’s top 3 goals for the next 3 years
Within the Aboriginal community, there is limited
understanding of mainstream systems and
services.
White Buffalo: “symbol of hope
and renewal for humanity and
for harmony between all
peoples, all races”
4
 Poverty; poor housing, homelessness
 Substance abuse; parenting capacity; fetal
alcohol syndrome
 Racism; discrimination
 Sensitivity training for each organization – anti
oppression
 Service coordination (referrals, resource manual)
- protocols
 Inclusion in systems planning - protocols
 Aboriginal representation in governance
 Children and youth mental health
 Education issues
 Meaningful consultation – policies
 Data Collection – Tracking Clients
 CULTURAL IDENTITY, LOSS OF CONNECTION
 LOSS OF BALANCE (Medicine Wheel)
Daphne Odjig, Wikwemikong, Manitoulin Island
A COMMUNITY BASED MODEL
Bringing
communities
together to
develop
solutions to
regional issues.
Native
Friendship
Centres
Georgian Bay
& Barrie
NATIVE
WOMEN’S
GROUPS
FIRST
NATIONS
Beausoleil, Rama,
Moose Deer,
Wahta, Georgina
Island
First Nations
require BCR’s
& orgs require
BOD’s motions
Inclusive &
respectful approach
BANAC
ABORIGINAL
SERVICE
AGENCIES
Enaahtig, SUN
Housing,
Medicine Horse
Orillia, Georgian
Bay, York Region,
Rising SUN
MÉTIS
Métis Nation of
Ontario and
Georgian Bay
Métis Council
Participation
varies
depending on
need or
community
capacity
HAAMB
Huronia Area
Aboriginal
Management Board
1992
AETC
Anishinabe
Education &
Training Circle
1992
EHL&LC
Wiidookdaadiwin
Alter Abled Circle
1994
BRAWC
Regional
Aboriginal
Women’s
Circle
2000
Aboriginal
Early Years
Study, Conference
And Program
2001
ACBC
BCC - BMO
2008
AADR
Medicine
Horse
2009
ABORIGINAL
CAPACITY
BUILDING CIRCLE
BIINOOJINSAUK
Children’s Planning
Circle
ABORIGINAL
HEALTH
CIRCLE
BANAC
Children’s
Mental
Health
Planning
Children's
Services
Kinark,, CMHA &
Enaahtig Outreach,
New Path Catulpa, etc
Children's
Special
Needs
Biinoojiisag
CYFSCoaltion
Children’s
Treatment
Network
LHIN’s, Best Start of
Simcoe County
MCYS
Child
Welfare
ACBC
Child Welfare
Advisory Circle
FNMI Unit
Children's
Health
Aboriginal Health
Circle
Dnaagdawenmag
Binnoojiiyag (7
First Nations)
Education
SCDSB
SMCDSB
AETC
Youth
Justice
Enaahtig
Outreach
YJAG
CMHA – Canadian Mental
Health Association
YJAG – Youth Justice
Advisory Group
SCDSB – Simcoe County
District School Board
SMCDSB – Simcoe Muskoka
Catholic District School
Board
AETC – Anishinabe
Education & Training Circle
CYFS – Child , youth and
family services
LHIN’s – Local Health
Integration Network
MCYS – Ministry of Children
& Youth Services
A Sample Model for Planning
Coalition
Council
Best Start &
Planning
Coordinator/
Admin
Children's
Mental
Health
Children’s
Special
Needs
Children’s
Services
ACBC
Children’s
Health
Child
Welfare
Child/Youth
Education
Youth
Justice
Community Engagement Planning
BANAC
Biinojinsauk
Children’s
Planning
Circle, AHC
Aboriginal Capacity
Builder
Organizational
Structures
Quick list of
FNMI
Agencies
FNMI Initial
Contact
Sheet (ICS)
25 Trained
CCAT
facilitators
CCAT
DVD with
Elders
Draft FNMI
tool for MH
Glossary of
Terms &
Acronyms
4 day CCAT
manual
Newsletter &
Medicine
Wheel
Boards
Interactive
Community
Service
Lifecycle
Wheel
211 Service
Maps & rack
cards
Creating a blue print for other
groups to look at ie:
Francophone & New Comers
• In Simcoe County, and throughout Canada, the Aboriginal
population is young, and is the fastest growing population.
• Through the project period, BANAC will engage in a series of
consultations with Elders and FNMI communities to discuss
and provide feedback on proposed concepts for integrated
child and family centres.
• This process will include our mainstream partners in
discussion, feed-back and recommendations for improving
access to child and family centres for the Aboriginal
population.
• Produce draft guidelines for the use and access of traditional
healing services and practices including sample policies and
procedures to support the integrity of traditional healing
practices.
• Document best practices and common protocols to improve
access and integration for child, youth and family systems.
• Ensure advice on best practices and common protocols are
provided to child and family centres and other systems that
affect children, youth and families ie: child welfare, education,
health, social services, etc.
• Demonstrate that collaboration is an effective approach to
address and reduce barriers to access for Aboriginal families
Please contact:
• Brenda Jackson
• Lora D’Ambrosio
[email protected]
[email protected]

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