Hysteria and Consequences

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GRAMMAR BELLRINGER: FRAGMENTS
Review: A fragment is a piece of a sentence. It needs
more information, including a subject and verb, to be a
complete sentence.
MID-TERM REVIEW SHEET #3
You have 15 min. to fill this out.

1. deference/paradox
2. fallacious/impassive

3. mandate/tantamount
4. capricious/sage

5. havoc/mandate
6. accommodate/egregious

7. languish/bequeath
8. genre/accolade

9. rationalize/vehemently 10. capricious/egregious

11. accolade/obsequious 12. vehemently/languish

13. fallacious/immutable
14. impassive/sage

15. havoc/fallacious
16. sage/paradox

17. nepotism/bequeath
18. impassive/immutable

19. bequeath/nepotism
20. havoc/genre
OPTIONS:
REVIEW QUESTIONS ON PATRICK
HENRY’S SPEECH.
LOGIC LEADERS:
With your group decide on the logic in your assigned
paragraph. What is Henry’s premise or assertion? What
is his main point in your paragraph? Is there pathos or
ethos, also? What?
RELIGIOUS PERSUASION
EQ: How can the rhetoric in a sermon impact
the listeners, particularly a Puritan community in
the 1700s?
THE GREAT AWAKENING: VIDEO
What was unusual about this religious revival? How did it bind the
American people together at this important point in history?
“ PRAYER IS AS NATURAL AN
EXPRESSION OF FAITH AS
BREATHING IS OF LIFE.
Jonathan Edwards, Puritan Minister
Read the personal bio on him (P. 85). Does he have ethos?
Explain.
”
FILL OUT THE STUDY GUIDE AS WE LISTEN.
Pages 91 (1-5 & EQ) & 92 (5-9)
GRAMMAR BELLRINGER: FRAGMENTS
EQ1: How can I identify a fragment?
Review: A fragment is a piece of a sentence. It needs more
information, including a subject and verb, to be a complete
sentence.
ENTRANCE TICKET: WOULD THE REACTION
TO EDWARDS’ SERMON BE DIFFERENT
TODAY? WHY/NOT?

Mid-Term: fragment review

Entrance ticket

Ppt & Video: Salem Witch Trials

Tea Party: The Crucible

Readaloud of the play

Cornell notes
AGENDA:
RELIGIOUS PERSUASION
EQ2: How can I understand a text about a
Puritan community in the 1600s?
EQ3: How can logical fallacies lead to
hysteria?
WHAT IS THE CALL TO ACTION?
Political ad
Coke commercial
Patrick Henry’s speech
Edwards’ sermon
SALEM WITCH TRIALS: VIDEO
TAKE NOTES!
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
1692 Salem Witch Trials (16th/17th cent. Europe as well)
20 executions & 100 imprisoned (P. 1128 graphic)
James I accused those against him of witchcraft.
In America – Puritans faced wilderness, where they felt danger & Satan or
evil dwelt.
They came for religious freedom, unlike the South who came for money/
profit.
Puritans – strict (bottom 1126), busybody laws (top 1127), theocracy (bottom
1128), controlling (top 1129), impure motives (middle 1129)
This story has historical roots and actual people/events. (He reduced the no.
of judges and girls & raised Abigail’s age.)
Miller compares this hysteria to that of the Inquisition (1200s) & McCarthyism
(1950s).
TIME FOR A TEA PARTY!

You will each get a quote from the play we are starting today.

Read over your anticipatory worksheet and fill in whatever
question(s) your quote addresses.

Then SILENTLY take your quote to someone else, shake hands, &
exchange quotes.

Read the quote and fill in whatever you can on the anticipatory
worksheet. Return the quote.

Find another partner and do the same. Then do the process a third
time. Sit down when finished with three.

NOW YOU WORK IN GROUPS of four. Share all your quotes and finish
answering all the questions on the worksheet together. You may talk
here.
TEA PARTY INSTRUCTIONS:
“
ABOMINATIONS WERE DONE IN THE FOREST . .
. . I SAW TITUBA WAVING HER ARMS OVER THE
FIRE WHEN I CAME ON YOU. . . AND I HEARD
A SCREECHING AND GIBBERISH COMING
FROM HER MOUTH.
Rev. Parris in The Crucible (Miller 1131)
”
Q: What was the Puritan community like?
A: Apparently they believed in witchcraft and feared it as an evil. They
also feared the wilderness.
Q: How do you see the motif of gullibility?
A: To fear this & believe that this behavior was a supernatural event is
pretty gullible. Today we would just think someone was crazy.
GRAMMAR BELLRINGER: FRAGMENTS
EQ1: How can I identify & correct a fragment?
Review: Typically to fix a fragment, you should add it to
the sentence in front of it, sometimes with a comma.
WHIP-AROUND REVIEW
Give one fact about Puritans, witch trials, crucible,
The Inquisition, McCarthyism, or the play.

Mid-Term: fragment review

Whip-Around Review

Silent reading

Video: McCarthyism

Readaloud of the play

Cornell notes
AGENDA:
RELIGIOUS PERSUASION
EQ: How can logical fallacies lead to hysteria?
READ PP. 1118-1121
& TAKE NOTES ON MCCARTHYISM.
VIDEO ON MCCARTHYISM
How was it like the Salem witch trials?
How could you get off?
What logical fallacies were a part of it?
“
YOU COULD TELL WHEN A DICTATOR WAS
ABOUT TO TAKE POWER IN A LATIN AMERICAN
COUNTRY OR WHEN ONE HAD JUST BEEN
OVERTHROWN, BY WHETHER THE CRUCIBLE
WAS SUDDENLY BEING PRODUCED THERE
ARTHUR MILLER
What in the world does he mean?!
”
CORNELL NOTES
Take Cornell notes on each act daily.
BELLRINGER:
REVIEW SHEET #4 FOR MID-TERM
WHAT IS THE ARGUMENT SALEM IS
MAKING?
WHAT ARE THE LOGICAL
FALLACIES HERE?
Entrance Ticket:
HISTORICAL PARALLELS
EQ: What are the historical parallels with our play, particularly in regards to
the modern-day world? Why is this significant to us personally?
AGENDA
• Review Sheet
• Entrance ticket
• Political cartoons
• Thinking map
• Video clip
• Parallel Partners
• Readaloud & Cornell notes
• Questions
THINKING MAP &
VIDEO: THE INQUISITION
(STOP AT 6.00 MINUTES.)
Draw a large box with a circle in a circle.
In the small, inside circle, write Inquisition.
Around it write all you know about the Inquisition.
In the outside box, tell me where you obtained this info (class, TV, dad, etc.)
PARTNERS: WRITE DOWN 4 PARALLELS.
The Inquisition, Salem Witch Trials, McCarthyism
Can you think of any other situation that is similar, particularly today?
CORNELL NOTES
Take Cornell notes on each act daily.
AIR TIME IN THE LIBRARY:
BRING ID CARDS TO CHECK OUT.
I want everyone to have a book . . .
and bring it to class to read when done with other assignments.
ENTRANCE JOURNAL:
PICK ONE.
1. WHAT DO YOU THINK OF THIS COMMUNITY? IS
THERE ANY WAY TO STOP THE HYSTERIA? PREDICT
WHAT WILL HAPPEN.
2. WHAT DO YOU THINK OF JOHN & ABIGAIL’S
ADULTERY? WHICH ONE DO YOU SIDE WITH &
WHY? HOW DOES THE AUTHOR MAKE YOU MORE
SYMPATHETIC TO THAT ONE?
When you finish, sticky note 3 entries for
grading & turn in journal.
2 REVIEW TASKS
• See historical note on the Inquisition (P. 1145).
• Quadrant views of P. 1153:
whole, bottom half, top left, top right with webcam
QUESTIONS AT THE END OF ACT I (1-6, 3, 5)
BELLRINGER:
REVIEW SHEET #6 FOR MID-TERM
HISTORICAL PARALLELS
EQ: What are other historical cases of hysteria based in religion that have
had tragic consequences?
AGENDA
• Review Sheet
• Photo & Fatwa (Look for logical
fallacies.)
• Readaloud & Cornell notes
• Questions (Act II)
THE TWIN TOWERS: BEFORE & AFTER . .
. WHAT WAS THE RELIGIOUS HYSTERIA THAT LED TO THIS TRAGEDY?
READ THE FIRST SEVEN PARAGRAPHS &
IDENTIFY LOGICAL FALLACIES.
http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/military-july-dec96-fatwa_1996/
GO TO HELPFUL LINKS ON MY WEB PAGE.
CLICK ON LOGICAL FALLACIES:
BIN LADEN’S SPEECH
(READ FIRST 7 PARAGRAPHS ONLY & LOOK FOR LOGICAL FALLACIES.)
HOW DO THESE FALLACIES RESEMBLE OTHERS
WE HAVE STUDIED?
How did the logical fallacies lead to a dangerous form of religious hysteria that had tragic consequences?
PAIR-SHARE . . .
WHAT IS THE ROOT OF THIS
HYSTERIA IN OUR PLAY IN YOUR
EVALUATION?
REVIEW FOR MID-TERM
CHARACTERIZATION
EQ: How are characters developed?
AGENDA
• Review
• Characterization ppt.
• Thinking maps
• Read-aloud (Act II)
• Questions (Act II)
WHAT DO YOU KNOW ABOUT
CHARLIE SHEEN?
TYPES OF CHARACTERIZATION
• Direct (“no-brainer,” based on the exact words of author: “She was a
kind person.”)
• Indirect (inference from words, actions, thoughts, & others’ opinions:
“She helped the girl pick up the dropped books.” We can infer she is kind.)
. . . Evidence is required for indirect characterization. You must be able to
PROVE IT from the TEXT!
CHARACTERIZATION
OF MARY WARREN
Direct
• “She is a subservient, naïve, lonely
girl” (Miller 1136).
Indirect
• Words: wants independence & to feel
grown-up and important “I’ll not be
ordered to bed no more!” (Miller 1167);
fearful “I cannot, I cannot” (Miller 1181)
• Thoughts: hysterical, gullible “With
hysterical fright” (Miller 1137)
• Actions: easily manipulated (poppet),
naïve (poppet with needle)
• Others’ opinions: John’s (lazy); Mercy’s
(tattle-tale on P. 1136)
MORE ON CHARACTERIZATION
• Flat (1-2 character traits, not believable)
• Round (several character traits, believable, contradictory, protagonist
usually)
• Static (character - stays the same)
• Dynamic (character - changes)
• Rite of passage = an experience that a character undergoes that
matures him/her
USING A BUBBLE MAP, DESCRIBE A
CHARACTER IN OUR PLAY.
Make sure to include a box to show your
evidence . . . what the author has said
(direct) or what the character has said,
done, or thought, or what are others’
opinions of him/her (indirect).
READ-ALOUD.
SNIPPET:
• Find a sentence or two in the play that you
think is powerful or makes you angry, etc. It
could remind you of an experience or you
just like it.
• Write it on one side of the index card with
quotation marks and documentation.
“ . . .” (Miller 1137).
• On the back of the card, write an
interpretation, reaction, personal
experience, etc.
QUESTIONS AT THE END OF ACT II
(1-8 & FLOW CHART ON NEXT PAGE)
PAIR-SHARE:
IF YOU LIVED IN SALEM THEN,
WHAT WOULD YOUR OPTIONS BE?
Evaluate: How effective & safe would these be?
CORNELL NOTES
Take Cornell notes on each act daily.

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