MedCruise Ports

Report
MedCruise Ports:
Effective responses in a dynamic market
Thanos Pallis
Secretary General, MedCruise
MedCruise:
Keeping the Med together
Adriatic
West Med
Black Sea
East Med
72 Members & 31 Associate members
(100 plus ports, 20 countries, 4 regions)
MedCruise:
Proudly representing the Med
By visiting the Med – you visit (at least) one MedCruise member
86%
81%
passenger movements
Cruise calls
MedCruise
Main objectives
–
Collaborate on solutions:
• Policies
• Operational issues
• Port Finances
• Environment
• Training
–
Promote the cruise destinations and the ports in the Mediterranean
and adjoining seas.
–
Develop quality passenger shipping experiences:
• Preserve diversity and authenticity.
• Manage congestion.
• Shared return: local communities, ships, passengers.
MedCruise member traffic 2012
Passenger movements and cruise calls
25.0 millions
passenger movements
Source: MedCrusie Statistics Report 2013 (4th edition)
13.685
cruise calls
Expansionary Deployment trends
Mediterranean bed days (‘000s)
30000
+197%
25000
10 years % change
20000
15000
8.153
10000 6.277 7.547 6.497
24.238
16.271
14.748
21.990
17.53618.538
9.704 9.73510.504
5000
+49%
5 years% change
0
2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Year by year more cruise beds days are available in the region
Source: MedCrusie Statistics Report 2013 (4th edition)
Cruise deployment trends
Deployed capacity shares 2012-2008-2003
Today
5 years ago
16,5%
3,4%
5,4%
4,1%
7%
9,8%
37,3%
2012
19,9%
Caribbean
Australia/New Zealand/S. Pac
23,0%
2,9%
7,6%
2,2%
7%
8,3%
Mediterranean
Alaska
10 years ago
37,2%
20,0%
2,4%
7,4%
1,6%
7%
2008
10,9%
17,6%
Europe w/o Med
South America
Today 20% of cruise bed days are in the Mediterranean
16,5%
Source:
37,3% MedCrusie Statistics Report 2013 (4th edition)
45,7%
2003
11,5%
Asia
Other Programs
Europe 2020
• A smart, sustainable and inclusive economy, in a
changing world.
• Five objectives:
– employment,
– innovation,
– education,
– social inclusion
– climate/energy
Cruise, Employment & Social inclusion
• Cruise industry has enjoyed economic prosperity
• During the recent challenging past succeeded to:
– attract new passengers,
– promote new destinations
– contribute to the economic recovery of many coastal
regions.
Cruise, Employment & Social inclusion
Cruise activities
• a very good environmental
record;
• sophisticated, state-of-theart ships that are safe and
secure;
• equipped with competent
crews.
Passenger Spending
€3.1 billion in passenger
and crew spending or about
€70* per passenger on
embarkation ports
€ 61 in each transit port.
€ 16 per crew member on
average spent at each port.
*Excluding airfare.
I. Accommodate traffic
I. Accommodate traffic
2,300 tons of water in its swimming pools
12,000 plants on board including hundreds of palm trees
Ports that allow berth alongside a
quay
Small ship (N=51)
Medium ship (N=51)
8%
Percentage of ports that
allows the option to
berth alongside a quay
for a transit call
blue = allowed,
red = not allowed
12%
88%
92%
Large ship (N=45)
Mega ship (N=42)
24%
76%
Source: MedCrusie Benchmarking Report 2013
33%
67%
The trend
Concessions of Cruise Terminals are increasingly becoming a
common practice
Types of Management in
MedCruise Ports
Source: MedCrusie Benchmarking Report 2013
MedCruise ports:
The trend
public management
25%
75%
Source: MedCrusie Benchmarking Report 2013
ports with public
management taking
action in involving
private
management
Investments made by MedCruise Ports in
cruise infrastructures in the last 10 years
PUBLIC 870.200.000 €
PRIVATE 119.750.000 €
TOTAL INVESTMENT 989.950.000 €
I. Accommodate traffic
Average pax. movements per call
Trend since 2000 and variations on prev. year
2000
1591
1500
1000
833
863
914
1005
1044
3.5%
25%
13.2%
12.5%
7.0%
6.0%
30%
1405
20%
9.9%
500
1257
1118
1331
1646
40%
1826
1785
35%
5.9%
3.9%
15%
8.5%
5.6%
2.3%
3.5%
0
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
Average per call
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
Var on prev. Year
Since more than 10 years the average is always increasing
Source: MedCrusie Statistics Report 2013 (4th edition)
2011
2012
10%
5%
0%
II. Cope with Traffic Seasonality
Near 80% of pax and calls is generated from May to October
4
Total pax. movements (in millions)
2.8 3.0 3.2
3.5
3
2.5
3.4
3.4 3.4
1.9
2
0.5
June-Aug.
39.3%
1.6
1.5
1
Sept.Nov.
34.3%
0.4 0.3 0.4
Dec.-Feb.
5.3%
March-May
21.1%
0.6
0
Jan.
2500
Feb.
March
Apr.
Cruise calls
1,793
2000
1500
May
1,171
June
July
Aug.
1,581 1,544 1,622
Sept.
Oct.
0
169 143
Jan.
Feb.
453
Apr.
May
June
July
Aug.
Sept.Nov.
35.3%
June-Aug.
35.0%
941
304
March
Dec.
1,873 1,969
1000
500
Nov.
Sept.
Oct.
Source: MedCrusie Statistics Report 2013 (4th edition)
Nov.
Dec.
Dec.-Feb.
5.6%
March-May
24.1%
III. Bring More Ports in the game
Ports concentration 2000-2012
Cruise calls since 2000
100%
90%
80%
75.4%
70%
82.2% 78.8%
77.4% 74.8% 74.0% 74.6% 74.0% 74.4% 73.7%
72.6% 74.5% 70.7%
55.0% 57.3% 52.7%
50.4% 48.2% 48.3% 48.6% 49.1% 50.8% 50.4% 48.5% 50.0% 46.9%
50%
60%
40%
30%
28.0%
20%
22.5% 19.2%
18.3% 16.7% 17.4% 17.7% 18.7% 18.5% 18.6% 18.0%
20.3%18.1%
10%
0%
2000
2001
2002
2003
first 3
2004
2005
2006
2007
first 10
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
first 20
• 18,1% of traffic in the 3 first ports, 70,7% in the first 20
• Less concentration of cruise calls than pax movements
Source: MedCrusie Statistics Report 2013 (4th edition)
Mediterranean 7 & 14 day Routes
(Ships travel @18 knots * 14 hours)
Venice, Italy
Marseille
Barcelona, Spain
Savona
Livorno
Civitavecchia;
Dubrovnik, Croatia
Bari Italy
Napoli
Palma Mallorca
Tunis
Catania
Valletta, Malta
Istanbul, Turkey
Athens
Kusadasi
Haifa &
Ashdod
Santorini
Mykynos
Limissol, Cyprus
Alexandria, Egypt
Bringing more ports in the game
• Beyond the world-famous marquee ports
– Absolutely necessary for every itinerary
– attract passengers and sell the cruise itinerary.
• Bring in discovery ports
– The concept: one that is not world-famous, but
provides a different sense to the cruise passenger
V. Take advantage of potential new
Markets
• Drive-to Train-to Homeports
–
–
–
–
–
–
France- Marseille, Toulon
Italy-Savona, Genoa, Civita, Napoli, Catania, Venice, Bari
Spain-Barcelona, Valencia, Malaga, Mallorca
Scandanavia- Copenhagen, Oslo, Stockholm
UK- Southampton
Germany - Kiel, Hamburg, Copenhagen,
… need to address the impact
• Environmental impact generated by cars and road
transport
• Development planning of tourist destinations
• Preserve natural resources and offer environmental
quality.
• Overall: balance maritime and tourism dimensions
of cruise activities.
Med ports
Work to sustain the effective and efficient way that have
served the market
•
– Capacity
– Berth allocation –MedCruise guidelines
– Pricing
– Ground transportation and access
– Passenger and luggage (terminal)
• Addressing users requirement and in parallel several considerations
–
–
–
–
Regulations – ISPS Code
People – background and training
Equipment – modern, efficient and used correctly
Processes, plans, procedures
MedCruise
Policy Matters of importance to MedCruise:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Emissions.
Global – Climate Change. CO2.
Local – Health issues SOx, NOx,.
Shore-side Electricity
Sulphur Directive
Waste management
Packaging
Define a plan for the recovery or re-use of 30%
Bio-waste
Act a plan for the re-use of
Paper
Define a plan for the recovery or re-use of 40%
90%
MedCruise
Increasing waste management efficiency
MATERIALS
IMPACTS
GLASS
10-12 t CO2 eq/cruise
-> 530,000 kg CO2 eq/year
ALUMINIUM
10 t CO2 eq/cruise
-> 490,000 kg CO2 eq/year
PLASTIC
7 t CO2 eq/cruise
-> 370,000 kg CO2 eq/year
PAPER/CARDBOARD
3,5 t CO2 eq/cruise
-> 180,000 kg CO2 eq/year
TOTAL
30 t CO2 eq/cruise
-> 1,600,000 kg CO2eq/year
MEASURE of the
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS:
CO2 emissions eq (i.e.
Greenhouse Gas emissions)
Equivalent to:
•
Using a car for 1 year for
1,000 passengers
•
CO2 absorbed by 1,000
trees
•
Emissions from a small
industrial plant
MedCruise
European Directive on waste (Reduction,
Re-use, Recycling) and Marpol Annex V.
Source: Costa Departments: Fleet Operations and Environmental Management
MedCruise
Source: Costa Departments: Fleet Operations and Environmental Management
MedCruise
• Euro-Mediterranean network of ports for the
cooperation in the management of waste
– To maximise the opportunity of waste recovery
– To improve energy efficiency
– To quantify the reduction of CO2 emissions deriving from
sustainable management.
– To define a new type of voluntary certification regarding the
treatment of waste

European Directive on waste (Reduction, Re-use,
Recycling) and Marpol Annex V.
The issue: Emmissions
• GHG emissions from shipping
– 4% of the EU GHG emissions.
– expected to increase significantly in the future.
– the only transport mode not included in the EU GHG
emissions reduction commitment (yet?)
• CO2 emissions from maritime transport related to intraEU routes
– +48% between 1990 and 2008.
– +51% by 2050 - despite the adoption of minimum ship
efficiency standards for new ships by the International
Maritime Organisation (IMO) in 2012.
The issue: emissions
• Welcome the intention to create a European system of
monitoring, reporting and verification (MRV) of carbon
dioxide (CO2) emissions from large ships as from 2018.
– a prerequisite for setting both emission reduction targets and for any
market-based measure or efficiency standard
• But don’t create modal disadvantages
– i.e. like those created due to customs and formalities when use shortsea shipping
– Blue Belt strategy needs to be a reality by 2015 if Europe 2020
strategy is going to succeed.
Thank you
Thanos Pallis
Secretary General MedCruise

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