CLS workshop - SecondarySocialScience

Report
Classical Studies
Level 2 and 3 NCEA
Workshop
Trudy Harvey
[email protected]
Purpose and intentions
A Explore and develop useful literacy practices to meet the
needs of all students
A Reflect on L2 Classical Studies so far
A Understand what is expected in the new L3 and Scholarship
Classical Studies
A Design an effective L3 Classical Studies programme catering
for your student needs
“Let each man exercise the art he knows.”
Aristophanes
Getting to know our Classics learners
NZC places the learner at the centre of teaching and learning and
teachers need to “attend to the cultural and linguistic diversity of
all students” (p34)
So, in order to create an effective, inclusive and dynamic learning
environment for our students:
A What do we need to know about our students before we start
teaching them?
A Why should we find out about these specifics?
http://www.ascd.org/publications/books/111011/chapters/Knowing-Our-Students-as-Learners.aspx
KNOW YOUR LEARNER
LIKES (‘stuff’ student enjoys)
CULTURAL AND SOCIETAL FACTORS
DISLIKES (‘stuff’ student doesn’t
enjoy)
(ethnic & racial background, cultural identity, economic status,
languages)
BACKGROUND –
SUCCESSES
(medical conditions/learning &/or physical
disabilities)
STUDENT:
ACADEMIC
(reading skills, focus, past success, written language,
interpretation
EMOTIONAL/SOCIAL
INFLUENCES
STRENGTHS
CHALLENGES
Adapted from Making Links for Learning
Siliva Gaugatao, Team Solutions (AKL)
(family structure and history, peer status, selfesteem, attitude)
Get to know your learner in context
Citizenship
and Society
Heritage
Culture and
Identity
Art and
Aesthetics
Empire and
Power
Conflict
Responding to the Data
A
A
A
A
Relationships with students
Programme design
Approaches to teaching and learning
Raising engagement and achievement
Example from WHS…
Level 1: Heroes and Villains
AS91021
Homer’s Heroes: The Odyssey
Demonstrate understanding of ideas and
values of the classical world.
4 credits
Level 2: Drama Drama
Level 3: Death Perception
1.1 AS91200
2.1
Aristophanic Comedy – Frogs and Clouds
Virgil’s Aeneid
Examine ideas and values of the classical
Analyse ideas and values of the classical
world.
world.
External 4 credits
AS91022
1.2
Images of Heroes in Greek Vase Painting
Demonstrate understanding of the significance
of features of work(s) of art in the classical
world.
4 credits
External 4 credits
External
AS91201
2.2
3.2
Pompeii Domestic Art and Architecture
Images of Death and the Afterlife in Greek
Examine the significance of features of work(s) Vase Painting
of art in the classical world.
Analyse the significance of a work(s) of art in
4 credits
External the classical world.
External
AS91023
1.3
Julius Caesar
Demonstrate understanding of an important
historical figure in the classical world.
3.1
4 credits
External
AS91202
2.3
3.3
Eruption of Vesuvius
Socrates
Demonstrate understanding of a significant
Analyse the impact of a significant historical
event in the classical world.
figure on the classical world.
4 credits
External 4 credits
AS91024
Relating to Caesar - Roman Social
Relationships
Demonstrate understanding of social
relationships in the classical world.
1.4 AS91203
2.4
3.4
Athenian Democracy and Social Life
Religious and Philosophical beliefs about
Examine socio-political life in the classical
Death and the Afterlife in Athens and/or
world.
Rome
6 credits
External Demonstrate understanding of significant
Internal
ideology(ies) in the classical world.
6 credits
Internal
6 credits
6 credits
Will also be offered in Y10 CLS in 2013
AS91025
1.5
Extraordinary Heroes: Modern Mythological
Film Representations
Demonstrate understanding of links between
aspects of the classical world and another
culture.
AS91204
2.5
Athenian Comedy and Modern Political
Satire
Demonstrate understanding of the relationship
between aspects of the classical world and
aspects of other cultures.
6 credits
6 credits
Internal
Internal
External
Internal
3.5
Representations of Death and the Afterlife
in Greek Vase Painting, Renaissance Art
and Literature, and modern media
Demonstrate understanding of the lasting
influences of the classical world on other
cultures across time.
6 credits
Internal
2012 -2013
Level 2
A
What worked well? Not so well?
A
New ideas/topics/teaching/learning
Level 3
A
Excited about?
A
Concerned about?
General queries??
Developing capability
How do we go about building our students
reading and writing capabilities to address the
requirements of the external Classical Studies
standards?
Are these skills the same or different for
internals?
Level 3
A Learning Objectives
A Indicators
A Concepts
A Achievement Standards
Learning objective 8-1
Students will gain knowledge, skills, and experience to:
 understand the complexity and diversity of social, political, artistic, and ideological aspects of the classical
world and how these aspects influenced the lives of Greeks and Romans living in those times.
Indicators



Selects relevant evidence and uses it to analyse the complexity and diversity of social, political, artistic, and/or
technological aspects of the classical world.
Thinks critically about primary and secondary sources about social, political, artistic, and/or technological aspects of
the classical world.
Analyses different perspectives on the connections between social, political, artistic, and/or technological aspects of
the lives of the ancient Greeks and Romans.
Concepts addressed in this learning objective





Citizenship and society
Culture and identity
Empire and power
Conflict
Art and aesthetics
Key concepts in classical studies
Possible context elaborations







Power and freedom, as conveyed through literary texts such as Philocleon in Aristophanes’ Wasps, the role of
destiny in Virgil’s Aeneid, Trimalchio’s banquet in Petronius’s Satyricon, the patron-client relationship in
Juvenal’s Satires, Augustus’ constitutional reform in Suetonius’s The Twelve Caesars: who holds real power?
Literary conventions, such as the use of language and imagery, for example, Aristophanic humour, Virgilian
symbolism: to what extent do literary conventions carry a message?
Art and architecture: the significance of features of work/s of art in their artistic/historical context, for example,
Euphronios’s vases as illustrations of the development of Red Figure techniques: what makes a work of art realistic?
OR the Arch of Titus illustrating imperial propaganda in the time of the Flavians: what is the connection between art
and politics?
Exercise of individual power (historical and literary), for example, Virgil’s Aeneas, Philip of Macedon, Alexander the
Great, Cicero, and Augustus: to what extent were these models of leadership successful?
Political alliances, such as the relationship between Alexander the Great and Parmenio or Augustus and Agrippa:
how do you choose and use your friends?
Competing ideologies – religious, philosophical, political belief systems, for example, Mystery religions, Christianity
and Roman state religion, Socrates and the Sophists, Stoicism and Epicureanism, Alexander’s Oriental Policy: whose
ideas are most convincing?
Propaganda as an instrument of the state, for example, Alexander’s ‘divine’ status, prophetic passages in
Virgil’s Aeneid: who is playing the instrument and who is listening to the music?
Level 3 draft standards
http://ncea.tki.org.nz/Resources-for-aligned-standards/Socialsciences/Classical-studies/Level-3-Classical-studies
One standard per group – an expert group
What are the key changes, what needs to be considered,
thoughts…
Then…
Join another group and share your findings
Wish list
If you could teach anything you wanted, what would you
include?
What would you throw out?
What new ideas and contexts would you like the course to
contain?
What do your students enjoy?
What do students want to learn and do in Classics?
How can you develop a course that provides for learner
choice as well as teacher choice?
What are the literacy and language skills required in
Classics?
Scholarship
In the first section candidates will be required to select two contexts from the list below:
•
•
•
•
Alexander the Great
Augustus
Socrates
Virgil’s Aeneid
• Aristophanic comedy
• Athenian Vase Painting
• Roman Art and Architecture
Within each context there will be two questions from which candidates will choose one.
Candidate responses should be in the form of a written essay.
In the second section candidates will be required to select one concept from the list below:
• Culture and Identity, with specific focus on religion and ideology
• Conflict, with specific focus on political and military conflict.
Candidates will be required to answer one question from this section, with reference to
either ancient Greece or ancient Rome. Candidates will be required to analyse and interpret
unseen sources of evidence (extracts and images) in relation to their selected concept.
Candidate response can be in the form of bullet points, diagrams, notes, extended
paragraphs or an essay.
Your Turn
Using what you already know about your
students, and what we’ve talked about and
seen today…
Design a L3 programme for your L3 class
next year.
Design a matrix for Classical Studies in your
school
Success?
AExplore and develop useful literacy practices to meet
the needs of all students
AReflect on L2 Classical Studies so far
AUnderstand what is expected in the new L3 and
Scholarship Classical Studies
ADesign an effective L3 Classical Studies programme
catering for your student needs
Where to from here?

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