Dundee Dementia Information Service

Dundee Dementia
Information Service
Maureen Hood
Library and Information
Facts & Figures
• Predicted figures indicate that by 2030 the number of people living to
aged 65 and over will rise by 30%, aged 75 and over by 40%, aged 85
and over by 93%
• With this ageing population in mind, levels of dementia diagnosis will
invariably increase.
• 87,772 People are living with dementia in Scotland (2014)
• 2,694 in Dundee alone.
• 63.5% live in the community
• 36.5% live in care
Project Background
• We recognise continued worldwide increase in dementia diagnosis
• Dundee City Council’s Single Outcome Agreement 2013-2017 reports
that people living in Dundee with ill health and frailty are more likely
to experience long term conditions associated with ageing at an
earlier stage
• From a user perspective dementia information can be “confusing and
difficult to navigate” (Scotland’s National Dementia Strategy: 20132016)
• Libraries have potential to become major partners in public
management of the condition
• Expands our existing health and wellbeing service portfolio
Project Aims
• Assist people living with dementia and their carers to easily access relevant
• Train staff and volunteers
• Increase understanding and self management of the condition
• Contribute towards a dementia enabled, dementia friendly community
• Support patients and families to adjust to diagnosis and its likely impact
• Provide opportunities for group interaction to reduce social isolation
Project Delivery
• Dedicated area in Dundee Central Library offering a safe, welcoming, nonclinical, bright, dementia friendly environment
• Build a quality collection of materials offering advice and information
• Trained library staff
• Raise awareness and understanding
• Develop links with local organisations
• Programme of themed sessions and activities
• Support volunteers
• NHS Tayside
• Social Work Department
• Dundee Carers’ Centre
• Alzheimer Scotland
• Volunteer Centre
• Dundee University
• Care Homes and Sheltered Housing Complexes
• Give ease of access to relevant materials to improve health and
• Increase access to health information and resources to help people live
better, healthier lives
• Create a safe, welcoming, non-clinical environment
• Assist and inform people adjusting to diagnosis
• Support carers
• Reading for pleasure tailored to suit dementia context
• Group activities
• Counteract loneliness and eliminate perceived stigma relating to the
“People living with dementia are part of our
community, permanently. Placing books in
libraries, signposting and providing
opportunities for literary therapy for people
with dementia plays an enormous role”
(Stephen Dalton, Chief Executive, NHS Confederation’s
Mental Health Network)
“People living with dementia often feel they have to
adapt to peoples’ attitudes and make other people feel
comfortable – it should be the other way round. We
should be raising awareness of what it’s like living with
dementia, not dismissing the life lived as if it’s all over”
(Dr Helen Gregory, Social Scientist & Psychology Lecturer, University of
[email protected]

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