Australopithecus-by-Julian-Diana-Nikolas

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Australopithecus
By Julian, Diana, Nikolas, Serra
Introductory Slide
Take a trip with us back in time to explore the
world before electronic technology and devices.
Discover how the Australopithecus lived millions
of years ago. Learn what they ate, where they
lived, how they lived, and what they looked like.
So come on a journey into the past and explore
the daily life of an Australopithecus.
Dates and Places
• The Australopithecus lived about five million
years ago. They commonly lived in Southern
and Eastern Africa.[1]
Appearances
• The Australopithecus were dramatically hairy.
They were forty-seven to sixty-seven inches
tall, and they walked upright on two feet. The
average weight of a male Australopithecus
was about ninety to one hundred fifty-four
pounds, and the female Australopithecus
weighed about fifty-five to sixty-six pounds.[2]
Shelters
• The Australopithecus would commonly live in
the open, finding shelter in tall trees to stay
out of sight from large predators and other
Australopithecus tribes.[3]
Food
• Australopithecus ate animals they hunted or
dead animals they found while hunting.
Primarily, they were scavengers. In addition
to eating animals, they would also look for
bird eggs, fruit, roots, leaves, insects, and
several other types of plants.[4]
Daily Life
• The Australopithecus would mainly spend
their lives trying to survive. So by doing that,
they would be mainly hunting for their tribe
and trying to stay alive.[5]
Tools
• Australopithecus did not invent. Instead, they
used natural resources like things that have
already been formed. For example, sticks and
stones would have been used as tools, but
they were not modified in any way by
Australopithecus.[6]
Fire
• The Australopithecus did not discover fire
because their lives were very difficult, and
they were mainly to occupied trying to
survive.[7]
Religion and Ceremonies
• Australopithecus had neither religion nor
ceremonies because they were too occupied
trying to find food and shelter and to survive
their harsh lives.[8]
Language
• The Australopithecus did not have exact
language, but they would use hand gestures
and sounds. They did not have a specific type
of language.[9]
Clothing
• The Australopithecus did not wear or make
clothes, but they might drape animals skins
over themselves when it was particularly cold
since they had no fire.[10]
Painting and Carvings
• The Australopithecus did not have the time
to paint and carve because they were too
busy trying to survive and stay alive.[11]
Lucy
• Lucy was an Australopithecus who died, possibly
by drowning in a river about 3.8 to 3.2 million
years ago. She was found in 1974 by Donald
Johanson and his team of archaeologists. Lucy
was three feet eight inches tall and weighed
about sixty pounds. Lucy’s name was chosen
because the archaeologists were listening to the
song “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds,” by the
Beatles, when they discovered the skeleton.
People suggested that the skeleton be named
Lucy, and so the name stuck.[12]
Questions
• What type of tools did the Australopithecus
use? Explain.
• Who was Lucy?
• How did the Australopithecus speak?
Answers
• Australopithecus did not invent tools. Instead, they
used natural resources like things that have already
been formed, for example sticks and stones.
• Lucy was an Australopithecus who died, possibly by
drowning in a river about 3.8 to 3.2 million years ago.
• Australopithecus did not have exact language, but
they would use hand gestures and sounds. They did
not have a specific language.[9]
Conclusion
• Woo, what a trip. Now that you've learned a
lot about the Australopithecus, we can travel
back in our own time and enjoy the
knowledge that we have discovered. We hope
you learned a lot about the life of
Australopithecus and what they did to stay
alive!
End Notes
1.
California Vistas Ancient Civilizations, Macmillian/ McGraw-Hill: New
York, NY, 2007, pp.64-67.
2. Ibid.
3. www. Ecotao.com./hoslim/hu_austral.htm 2008.
4 Early humans packet.
5. www. Ecotao. com /hoslim/hu_austral.htm 2008
6. johnhawks. Net/… / dikikia-cutmarks-mcpherron-2010. html
7. Interview with Ricky Rivera.
8. California Vistas Ancient Civilizations, Macmillian/ McGraw-Hill: New
York, NY, 2007, pp.64-67.
9. Ibid.
10. www. Ecotao.com./hoslim/hu_austral.htm 2008.
11. Ibid.
12. California Vistas Ancient Civilizations, Macmillian/ McGraw-Hill: New
York, NY, 2007, pp.64-67.
Bibliography
• California Vistas Ancient Civilizations.
Macmillian/ McGraw-Hill: New York, NY,
2007.
• Kearns, Marsha.“Homo Habilis.” Early
Humans. Creative Teaching Press: CA,
1993.
• www. Ecotao.com./hoslim/hu_austral.htm
2008.

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