Decision Making for Results

Report
Decision Making for Results
Decision Making for Results (DMR)
DMR is a six-step process that allows you to
examine your school or district data at the
macro level. After analyzing this data in a
collaborative manner, you will be able to make
leadership and instructional decisions to guide
your continuous school improvement.
Principles of Decision Making for Results (DMR)
Antecedents
Adult Actions
(Cause Data)
Accountability
* Instructional Strategies
* Administrative Structures
* Conditions for Learning
* Congruence
* Respect for Diversity
* Fairness
* Specificity
* Accuracy
* Universality
* Feedback for
continuous
improvement
Collaboration
Collaboration has
to be built into
every step of data
management and
integrated into
every data-driven
decision.
“Only by evaluating both causes and effects
in a comprehensive accountability system
can leaders, teachers, and policymakers
understand the complexities of student
achievement and the efficacy of teaching
and leadership practices.”
Reeves, 2006
Reeves, 2006
Definitions and Examples
Effect data:
Outcomes or results
Cause data:
Professional practices
that create specific
effects or results
DMR Six-Step Process
Inquiry:
Develop
Questions
Step 1:
Conduct a
Treasure
Hunt
Step 2:
Analyze Data
to Prioritize
Needs
Step 6:
Monitor and
Evaluate
Results
Step 3:
Establish
SMART
Goals
Step 5:
Determine
Results
Step 4:
Select
Specific
Indicators
Strategies
Step 1: Conduct a Treasure Hunt
Why?
To gather and organize data in order to gain insights
about teaching, learning, and leadership practices.
Considerations:




Measures of Data
Disaggregation
Triangulation
Reflection
Measures of Data can include:
Student
Performance
Data
School
Process
Data
Behavior
Data
Measures
of
Data
Perception
Data
Well-Being
Data
Demographic
Data
Disaggregation
• To separate something into its component
parts, or break apart
“Disaggregation is not a problem-solving strategy.
It is a problem-finding strategy.”
- Victoria Bernhardt, Data Analysis for
Comprehensive Schoolwide Improvement 1998
Example of Step 1 (The Treasure Hunt):
School:
Anytown Middle
Assessment Data:
Grade 8 GA Writing Data, Item Analysis, and School/District Assessment
Subskill(s):
Writing Process
Content Areas and School Year Data
Content Area: Writing
Content Conventions
→
Content Content/Development
Content Organization
Represents
Enter Grade Level or Special Subgroups
ALL
Caucasian
African American
Hispanic
ELL
Non-ELL
SPED
Non-SPED
School Year ’11, ‘12, ‘13
↓
13
12
11
13
12
11
13
12
11
13
12
11
13
12
11
13
12
11
13
12
11
13
12
11
88/118 = 74.5%
71/111 = 63.9%
74/107 = 69.1%
49/54 = 90.7%
42/51 = 82.3%
45/52 = 86.5%
25/37 = 67.5%
18/35 = 51.4%
21/33 = 63.6%
14/27 = 51.8%
11/25 = 44%
8/22 = 36.3%
4/12 = 33.3%
3/11 = 27.2%
3/8 = 37.5%
84/106 = 79.2%
68/100 = 68%
71/99 = 71.7%
7/25 = 28%
7/23 = 30.4%
7/22 = 31.8%
75/93 = 80.6%
59/88 = 67%
63/85 = 74.1%
School Year ’11, ‘12, ‘13
13
12
11
13
12
11
13
12
11
13
12
11
13
12
11
13
12
11
13
12
11
13
12
11
82/118 = 69.4%
66/111 = 59.4%
70/107 = 65.4%
46/54 = 85.1%
39/51 = 76.4%
42/52 = 80.7%
23/37 = 62.1%
17/35 = 48.5%
20/33 = 60.6%
13/27 = 48.1%
10/25 = 40%
8/22 = 36.3%
4/12 = 33.3%
3/11 = 27.2%
3/8 = 37.5%
78/106 = 73.5%
63/100 = 63%
67/99 = 67.6%
7/25 = 28%
7/23 = 30.4%
7/22 = 31.8%
81/93 = 87%
61/88 = 69.3%
61/80 = 76.2%
School Year ’11, ‘12, ‘13
13
12
11
13
12
11
13
12
11
13
12
11
13
12
11
13
12
11
13
12
11
13
12
11
63/118 = 53.3%
51/111 = 45.9%
53/107 = 49.5%
35/54 = 64.8%
30/51 = 58.8%
32/52 = 61.5%
18/37 = 48.6%
13/35 = 37.1%
15/33 = 45.4%
10/27 = 37%
8/25 = 32%
6/22 = 27.2%
3/12 = 25%
2/11 = 18.1%
2/8 = 25%
60/106 = 56.6%
49/100 = 49%
51/99 = 51.5%
5/25 = 20%
5/23 = 21.7%
5/22 = 22.7%
58/93 = 62.3%
46/88 = 52.2%
48/85 = 56.4%
Triangulation
Triangulation is a process that allows you to view achievement results with
different lenses and provides a more comprehensive picture of teaching,
learning, and leadership. Triangulation can be applied to the data-driven
decision-making process by examining the interaction of antecedent data,
collaboration data, and accountability data. Each set lends itself to trend
tracking and pattern identification. In broad terms, triangulation is a method
of extrapolating meaning from raw data – a way to find the critical
information, see the big picture, and identify key components (angles). In
education, triangulation describes efforts to determine needs or targets
from diverse types of data.
(Stephen H. White, Beyond the Numbers, 2011, pgs. 103-108).
Triangulation Example:
GA Grade 8 Writing Assmt.
Strong increase in scores ‘12 to ‘13 but
significant performance gaps btw. Caucasian,
Afr. Am., & Hispanic
All students stronger on conventions – 74.5%
proficient
Organization – all students 53.3% proficient
Students’ Writing Portfolios
School’s Mock Writing Prompt
Show frequent drafts with revisions
for mechanics, conventions, etc.
90% of students proficient in
writing
Show student multiple idea
development drafts/feedback
85% of students proficient in
selected Organization
Show less evidence of proofreading
and editing
Significant performance gaps when
compared to PASS results
Step 2: Analyze Data to Prioritize Needs
Why?
To identify causes for celebration and to identify
areas of concern
Considerations:




Strengths
Needs
Performance behavior
Inference
Example of Step 2 (Analyze Data to Prioritize Needs):
Performance Behavior:
Strength(s):
Conventions
Content Development
Rationale
• We gave multiple opportunities for students to practice revising their
own writing in order to improve conventions, mechanics, etc. We held
multiple job-embedded PD sessions on this portion of the Writer’s
Workshop.
• Content/Development – We had PD on developing ideas in student’s
planning and drafting samples in portfolios.
Obstacle(s):
Organization
• Organization – Students are able to identify organizing topic and
supporting details for their writing but do not transition from that to a
well organized paper. PASS results show weak organizational
components and students’ writing samples show week transitions.
Step 3: Establish SMART Goals
Why?
To identify your most critical goals for student achievement based on
the challenges that were identified throughout the inquiry process.
Criteria:





Specific (What exactly will we measure?)
Measurable (How will we measure it?)
Achievable (Is this a reasonable goal?)
Relevant (Are goals aligned with the CIP?)
Timely (Does each goal have a defined timeframe?)
Example of Step 3 (Establish SMART Goals):
Goal 1
Organization
Grade 8 students
Percentage of ________________________
scoring proficient or higher in _________________
53%
68%
2013 - 2014 school
will increase from ____________
to _____________
by the end of the ____________
GA Grade 8 Writing Assmt.
Feb 2014
year as measured by _________________________
administered in ___________________.
Goal 2
Percentage of ________________________ scoring proficient or higher in _________________
will increase from ____________ to _____________ by the end of the ____________ school
year as measured by _________________________ administered in ___________________.
Step 4: Select Specific Strategies
Why?
Adult Actions will impact student achievement
Strategies are:
Considerations:








Action-oriented
Measurable
Specific
Research-based
Instructional Strategies
Organizational Strategies
Leadership Strategies
Programmatic Strategies
Example of Step 4 (Select Specific Strategies):
Prioritized Needs (2-3 Maximum):
Organization
Strategies (4 Maximum)
• Instructional – Engage students in editing and revising for every paper
created in the Writer’s Workshop including 2 or 3 times a week mini
lessons on transitioning from brainstorm to writing
• Leadership and Organizational – change the schedule in order to
provide a common planning time and schedule Literacy Coach to attend
ELA meetings 2 x week
• Leadership and Instructional – Increase teacher capacity in this
component of the Writer’s Workshop through initial PD followed by
coaching and feedback provided by building Literacy Coach and District
PLS – min 2 x week
Step 5: Determine Results Indicators
Why?
To monitor the degree of implementation and evaluate
the effectiveness of the strategies.
Considerations:
 Serve as an interim measurement
 Used to determine effective implementation of a strategy
 Used to determine if strategy is having the desired
impact
 Used to help determine midcourse corrections
Example of Step 5 (Determine Results Indicators):
Prioritized Needs (2-3 Maximum):
Strategy
Leadership and Organizational –
change the schedule in order to
provide a common planning time
and schedule Literacy Coach to
attend ELA meetings 2 x week
Strategies (4 Maximum)
• Implementation: Master calendar reflects common planning time;
Literacy Coach’s calendar shows preserved time for 2 x week ELA
meetings; minutes of meetings show evidence of collaboration on writing
• Effectiveness: Classroom observations show evidence of strategies
discussed in collaboration actually in use; Portfolio samples show
evidence of collaboratively planned strategy use
Step 6: Monitor and Evaluate Results
Why?
To engage in a continuous improvement cycle that:
•
Identifies midcourse corrections where needed
•
Adjusts strategies to ensure fidelity of implementation
Example of Step 6 (Monitor and Evaluate Results):
Monitoring Plan Template
Cluster or School
Team
Date
Goal
Targeted Strategies
Has This Strategy Been Implemented?
Not Implemented
Partially Implemented
Implemented Fully
Has This Activity Had Impact?
Yes
No
Dates of Next Monitoring Cycle
Reasons Expected Impact Did or Did Not Occur:
Reasons Implementation Was Incomplete or Did Not Occur?
Evidence of Actual Impact on Instructional Practice and/or Student Learning:
Suggested Adjustments or Recommendations:
Reflections:
Other Relevant Information:
Additional Support:
Data Teams Refresher Courses will be offered during the
2013-14 SY. Check MyPLC for updates and to register.
Always Feel free to Contact your Regional Data Analysts
in the department of Research & Evaluation for School Improvement:
•
•
•
•
•
East Region – Stacey L. Johnson ([email protected])
West Region – Curtis L. Grier ([email protected])
South Region – Adrienne T. Johnson ([email protected])
North Region – Holly Hayes-Morrisey ([email protected])
CLL – Adam Churney ([email protected])

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