Georgia Founders

Report
THE FOUNDING
OF GEORGIA
2nd grade Turboquest
Created by:
Lauren May
Contessa Wnek
Rebecca Rogers
OVERVIEW:
SOCIAL STUDIES
SS2H1The student will read about and describe the lives of historical figures in Georgia history.
Elements:
a.
Identify the contributions made by these historic figures: James Oglethorpe, Tomochichi,
and Mary Musgrove (founding of Georgia);
b. Describe how everyday life of these historical figures is similar to and different from
everyday life in the present (food, clothing, homes, transportation, communication,
recreation, rights, and freedoms).
MATH
M2N2. Students will build fluency with multi-digit addition and subtraction.
•
a. Correctly add and subtract two whole numbers up to three digits each with regrouping.
READING
ELA2W2 The student writes in a variety of genres, including narrative, informational, persuasive, and
response to literature.
Elements:
•
The student produces informational writing that:
•
a. Captures a reader’s interest. b. Begins to sustain a focused topic. c. Includes the
appropriate purpose, expectations, and length for the audience and genre. d. Adds
facts and details.
INTRODUCTION:
We at the Georgia Historical Foundation have lost
important files on three local heroes; Mary
Musgrove, James Oglethorpe and Tomochichi.
You will be divided into three research teams.
Each team will research one of the historical
figures above. Once all of your data has been
collected you will present your finding to the
Georgia Historical Foundation.
Click to
View the
video!
PROCESS:
Congratulations on being chosen for the important task of
restoring our files. Your team will create and present a bulletin
board containing your findings.
Get with your assigned research team.
Follow the directions and complete the tasks given. You will
find the tasks on individual power points for the person you are
researching.
Once all your research is done you will then begin to assemble
your bulletin board.
After the bulletin board is complete, bring it to your teacher
for approval.
When your bulletin board is approved you may present it to
the Georgia Historical Foundation. Good luck!

Click the person you will be interviewing for
more directions!
MARY MUSGROVE
You are going to be interviewing Mary Musgrove. You
will learn about her early life and how she was able to
be an interpreter for Oglethorpe and talk to
Tomochichi about the settlement of
Savannah and her role in the Founding of
Georgia. You will learn so much about her
so get excited!!
Click the picture to
begin!
JAMES OGLETHORPE:
Your job is to interview James
Oglethorpe, the founder of Georgia!
You will be asking him questions to
learn about his childhood, how he
founded Georgia, and his life after!
Along the way you may also be
asked to complete other tasks.
Have fun on your journey in
learning!
Click the picture to
begin!
TOMOCHICHI:
Tomochichi was a huge help to
Oglethorpe in the founding of Georgia.
If you are interviewing Tomochichi, you
will learn all about his role in making
our state what it is today! There are
many exciting facts waiting to be
learned!
Click the picture to
begin!
CONCLUSION:
Thank you for helping us get our
information back! We hope you enjoyed
meeting the three founders of Georgia!
It is now time for you to present your
findings to the foundation! Create a
poster to present on the person that you
interviewed. For more information you
can visit this website:
http://www.gpb.org/georgiastories/stories/daily_life_in_georgia
http://www.gpb.org/georgiastories/stories/mary_musgrove
Google Images
EVALUATION/RUBRIC:
CATEGORY
Speaks Clearly
4
Speaks clearly and distinctly
all (100-95%) the time, and
mispronounces no words.
3
Speaks clearly and distinctly
all (100-95%) the time, but
mispronounces one word.
Preparedness
Student is completely
Student seems pretty
prepared and has obviously prepared but might have
rehearsed.
needed a couple more
rehearsals.
The student is somewhat
Student does not seem at all
prepared, but it is clear that prepared to present.
rehearsal was lacking.
Listens to Other
Presentations
Listens intently. Does not
make distracting noises or
movements.
Sometimes does not appear Sometimes does not appear
to be listening but is not
to be listening and has
distracting.
distracting noises or
movements.
Collaboration with Peers
Almost always listens to,
Usually listens to, shares with, Often listens to, shares with,
shares with, and supports the and supports the efforts of and supports the efforts of
efforts of others in the group. others in the group. Does not others in the group but
Tries to keep people
cause "waves" in the group. sometimes is not a good
working well together.
team member.
Listens intently but has one
distracting noise or
movement.
2
Speaks clearly and distinctly
most ( 94-85%) of the time.
Mispronounces no more than
one word.
1
Often mumbles or can not be
understood OR
mispronounces more than one
word.
Rarely listens to, shares with,
and supports the efforts of
others in the group. Often is
not a good team member.
Created by: Lauren May
Table of Contents:

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


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GPB Video
Early Life
English Settlement
Differences in lifestyle with
the Creeks & the English
Pictures of differences in
Creek houses
Map of childhood homes
Years spent in Creek villages
and English settlements
Bilingual
Trading Post
Becoming an Interpreter for
Oglethorpe
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
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Savannah, Georgia
Map of Colonial Georgia
Convincing the Creek to
join the English side
Accomplishments
Dependability
Organizational Chart of
Musgrove
Timeline
Key Words
Keys Word continued
Closing thoughts
GBS Video:
Click on the video camera below and a
browser will open. Then I want you to click
play and watch a quick video about my life
before we start the interview! Enjoy
Early Life:
Hi! My name is Coosaponakeesa (KOO
sah poe nah KEE sah) but everyone
knows me as Mary Musgrove (I will
explain this more in detail later in the
interview). I was born in the Creek Village
of Coweta, which is near present-day city
of Macon, Georgia. My mother is Creek
and my father is an English trader!
English Settlement:
When I was 10 years old, I moved to an
English settlementwith my dad’s family
which is present-day Charleston, South
Carolina. I learned to speak English, &
this is when I was given
my other name, Mary.
This is what a colonial
Charleston home looked like!
When I lived in Charleston, many things were different for me. Take a
look at this chart to see the differences..
Creek Life
English Life
Lived in houses without walls in the
summer to keep cool; Lived in another
house during the winter with walls of
clay and wood.
* Click on the green star to see pictures of
their houses
Lived in the same house year-round that
was made of brick or wood that were
more than one story tall.
The women were responsible for cooking,
sewing, & farming; the men were
responsible for hunting & fishing.
Children played games and went to
school .
Clothing was made from deerskin that
was soft, warm, and did not tear easily.
Women wore long dresses made of velvet
or silk & sometimes wore wigs; the men
wore ruffled shirts & velvet jackets.
**Click on the triangle when you are done reading this chart.
Look at the differences in my summer and
winter Creek houses….
Click on this green
star to take you
back to the chart to
learn more about
the differences in
lifestyle
Here is a map of my Childhood Homes:
Years spent in Creek villages and English
Settlements:
10
50
Creek
English
Creek
5
50
45
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
Creek
English
Creek
Bilingual:
When I was 15 years old, I moved back to my
Creek family. I was able to speak both English &
Creek so I began to help English settlers & Creek
traders speak to each other.
Trading Post:
In 1722, I opened my
own Trading Post,
which is a place for
people to trade things
they have for other
things.
Trade in the early 1700s
Traded by the
Creek
Traded by the
English
Deerskin
Metal Tools & Cloth
Becoming an Interpreter for Oglethorpe:
In 1733, James Oglethorpe wanted to
start a new EnglishColonycalled Georgia.
He asked me to help himcommunicateto
the Creeks. I quickly became
hisinterpreter. (Remember, I spoke both
Creek and the English language).
Savannah, Georgia:
Oglethorpe had me talk to the Yamacraw Creek
leader, Tomochichi. This is when he agreed to let
Oglethorpe build the settlement of Savannah. The
Creeks and English continued to trade with each
other. The Creeks also showed
The English how to grow crops.
Savannah grew and became
Georgia’s first city!
This me, Oglethorpe &
Tomochichi talking!
Here is a map of Colonial Georgia:
Convincing the Creek to join the English side:
I continued to help Oglethorpe talk to the
Creek leaders and worked to keep peace
with the Creek and English settlers. But
soon enough, the English and Spanish
settlers in the area began to fight and I
was able to convince the Creek to join the
English side!
Accomplishments:
I also had a Trading Post in Savannah. In
1735, I was the richest woman in Georgia
and I became the largest landowner in the
colony! Although I was
known for these great
things, I was mainly
remembered for helping
the Founding of
Georgia!
Dependability:
The Creek and English knew they could trust me.
They relied on me to help speak with each other.
The character trait they refer me to is dependable.
In what ways do your friends, family, and
classmates depend on you?
Helped
Oglethorpe
talk to
Tomochichi
Spoke both
Creek and
English
languages
Mary
Musgrove
Largest
landowner
and richest
women in her
colony
Opened a
Trading Post in
Savannah
Here is a timeline of my life:
1700
1733
(0-10 yrs
old) Lived
in Creek
Village of
Coweta
1710
(10 yrs old)
Moved to
English
settlement of
Charleston,
South
Carolina.
1715
(15 yrs old)
Moved back
to Creek
family
1722
(22 yrs old)
Opened
Trading Post
(33 yrs old)
Oglethorpe
came to talk to
the Creeks.
This was my
first time to as
Oglethorpe’s
interpreter.
1735
(35 yrs old)
Named the
richest
woman in
Georgia and
the largest
landowner in
the colony!
Key Words:
Coosaponakeesa:
Mary Musgrove’s Creek name
Mary Musgrove:
Coosaponakeesa’s English name; helped Creek Indians
and English settlers talk to each other. She helped start
the city of Savannah and was Oglethorpe’s interpreter
Coweta:
Creek Village that Mary Musgrove once lived in
Settlement:
People live in a settlement when they first arrive in a
new land
Bilingual:
Being able to speak 2 languages
Trading Post:
People go to a trading post to trade things they have
for other things
Key words:
James Oglethorpe:
Started the colony of Georgia.
Colony:
A place that is ruled by another country
Communicate:
To share information
Interpreter:
Explains words from one language to another language
Tomochichi:
Helped with the founding of Georgia. He kept peace
between the Yamacraw Indians and the English settlers
Depend:
A person who can be trusted is someone you depend on
Closing Thoughts:
Well, Thank you so much for
showing such interest in my life! I
thoroughly enjoyed sharing all these
major events that played a big role in
who I am today!
Congratulations! You have just
completed your interview with
Mary Musgrove! Click the home
button to find out what to do next!
Founder of Georgia
Created By: Rebecca
Rogers
Table of Contents
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


Helpful Hints
Introduction Video
Meet James Oglethorpe!
Early Life




School
Activity
Before Coming to Georgia
Creating the Colony
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Why?
Where?
Activity
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Friendships Formed with
the Indians
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Tomochichi
Mary Musgrove
What Georgians Grew
After Georgia
Closure
Worksheets/ Activities
Hints to Help You Along Your Journey!
Buttons that look like this will be seen on the
bottom of some pages. These will bring you
back to the page with the questions.
Underlinedwords are vocabulary words.
Clicking on these words will take you to a
glossary where you can find out what that
word means.
These buttons take you back to the page you
were previously on.
You are about to meet and interview
JAMES OGLETHORPE!
Before beginning your journey view this video on how
life was for the first colonists of Georgia! Click the
video camera below to see the video!
How was life different for the colonists from us today?
Would you like to live as a colonist? James Oglethorpe DID
live as a colonist! Let’s meet him!
Hello boys and girls! Welcome to 1700s! Your job is to interview James
Oglethorpe, the founder of Georgia, to regain the information that we have
lost! Choose questions to ask Mr. Oglethorpe that will help us learn about
how Georgia was made and the life of James Oglethorpe!
•What was your childhood like?
•What was your job before you
came to Georgia?
Hello! I’m James
Oglethorpe! I’ll
answer any
questions you
have!
•Why did you decide to found
Georgia?
•Where did you decide to
colonize Georgia?
•Were there any people that
helped you colonize
Georgia?
•What did you do after
Georgia was colonized?
•How did Georgians
make money? Did you
grow any specific crops?
At the end of some slides there
will be a question mark at the
bottom. Click this button to get
back to this slide!
My childhood? Well let me tell
you about it…
I was born in 1696. That is over 300 years ago!! In my
time, you could only go to school if your family was rich.
My family was rich so I was able to attend school. My
favorite subject is reading and I love to learn new
languages!
Some families couldn’t afford to send
their children to school. Some children
had to start working at the age of 5!
In our time, all children are allowed to go to school. It
does not matter how much money your family has!
You are all very lucky! Using the chart below, write
down 4 things that you enjoy about school!
Seeing
Friends
Games
in PE
Favorite
Things
About
School
Science
Experime
nts
Reading
new
books
My job before colonizing
Georgia…
Before coming to Georgia, I worked for
Parliament. I tried to make laws that helped
out poorer people. I also had compassion for
people who were in prison due to debt.
I asked the King of Spain, King George II,
for permission to bring some of the
recently released prisoners to a new colony
that I wanted to start. He agreed! That was
the first step to founding Georgia ( which
was named after King George II). I wanted
to give these people land and tools to
become great famers to be able to support
their families!
Why did I decide to found Georgia?
Good Question!
I chose land along the
Savannah River to settle
the colony on. I named
the settlement Savannah.
I divided the land into 4
sections and decided
where buildings and
streets would go .
This is my sketch of what
Savannah would look like.
Click the
drawing for a fun
activity!
Where did I chose to settle the
colony of Georgia?
Use a piece of
construction
paper, create your
own colony!
Draw and label
sections of your
colony!
Savannah, GA 1733
BE CREATIVE!!
Were there any people that helped me
colonize Georgia? I am so glad you
asked!
These two people are Tomochichi and Mary
Musgrove. They were the biggest help to me!
Click on their picture and let them tell you how
they helped out!
I am Tomochichi,
chief of the Creek
Indians that live in
Georgia.
At the time, Creek Indians lived near
Savannah. I was their chief. When James
Oglethorpe first moved to Georgia I wanted
to become friends so that the Indians and
Georgians could be friends. Because of our
friendship, we were able to live in peace with
each other and work the land together.
I am a very special
Creek Indian. I can
speak both the
Creek language
AND English. No
one else can do
this. My chief,
Tomochichi can’t
speak English. I
helped Oglethorpe
and Tomochichi talk
to each other.
My name is Mary
Musgrove. I am a
Creek Indian.
How did we make money, you ask?
What crops did we grow? I can’t wait to
tell you about that!
At first, it was very hard for us to farm the land. The weather
was VERY different in Georgia. It was very hot and it rained a
lot more. Click on the picture of the chart to compare the rainfall
in Spain to that in Georgia.
Georgians were able to successfully grow 2
main crops: Peaches and Cotton! Click on
each crop for an activity.
Rainfall:
Spain Compared to Georgia
Rainfall in Inches
According to these
charts, did it rain
more in Georgia or
in Spain?
Inches
List some foods or objects that can be made with
either cotton or peaches.
Things Made With Cotton
Things Made With Peaches
T-Shirts
Ice Cream
Blankets
Milkshakes
Socks
Pie
Pajamas
Jam/Jelly
What did I do after Georgia was colonized? I am
very proud of my work in Georgia but there were
bigger needs for me back in England…
I went back to England to
help people who could not
help themselves. One of
the areas I wanted to
protect was the liberty of
others. I spent most of the
rest of my life working to
end slavery. I wrote into
newspapers and gave
money to help this cause.
On your own paper, pretend
to write to your local
newspaper and give 3
reasons why slavery is
wrong.
THANK YOU for listening to
my story today! The next
few pages are some
questions that will help you
understand the founding of
Georgia better!
When you have completed your quest back through time, you
will print off this sheet and answer the questions!
Name: ___________________________
Date: _____________________
1.What were the names of the two people who helped James Oglethorpe?
1.What is the name of the first city colonized in Georgia?
1.What were the two main crops that Georgians grew?
1.Where did James Oglethorpe work before he colonized to Georgia?
For those up for a challenge, try this Math
problem!
There were 115 original colonists that came to Georgia
when it was first started. How many more colonists
would have to come if James Oglethorpe had wanted
150 colonists to come?
HINT: Here is a math sentence that might help you!
1
115 + ____ = 150
Match the events to their place on
the timeline!
1743
1696
1733
Sentence Bank:
1.James Oglethorpe is born.
2.James Oglethorpe goes back to England.
3.Oglethorpe lands and begins GA in the city of Savannah.
4.Oglethorpe works for Parliament.
5.Tomochichi and Mary Musgrove become friends with
and help Oglethorpe.
6.Georgians begin to successfully grow cotton and
peaches.
Match the events to their place on
the timeline!
Oglethorpe
lands and
begins GA in the
city of
Savannah.
James
Oglethorpe
is born.
1696
Oglethorpe
works for
Parliament.
Sentence Bank:
Georgians
begin to
successfully
grow cotton and
peaches.
1733
Tomochichi and
Mary Musgrove
become friends
with and help
Oglethorpe.
1743
James
Oglethorpe
goes back
to England.
* Use this
slide to
check your
answers!
Vocabulary







HINT: Click on the word to
go back to the page you
were on!
Colony- a place ruled by people in another
country
Compassion- caring about and helping others
Debt- money owed to other people
Liberty- freedom from the control of others
Parliament- England’s government in charge of
creating and enforcing laws
Settlement- a community started by people from
another land
Slavery- a system forcing people to work without
pay
Congratulations! You have
just completed your
interview with James
Oglethorpe! Click the home
button to start your interview
of the next person!
By: Contessa Wnek
Let’s Go!!
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Tomochichi Quick Facts
Introduction
Interactive Timeline
Important Dates
Accomplishments
Everyday Life
Map from 1745
Map of Yamacraw Territory
2008 Population of Georgia Pie Chart
2008 Population of Georgia Bar Graph
Vocabulary
Think about it!
Go to Quick Facts
My friends
Yamacraw
Indian Chief
Friend To James
Oglethorpe
Tomochichi
Settled Along the
Savannah River
Mediator
Click the
teepee to start
the journey
Hi, my name is Tomochichi (TOHM
oh chee chee). I am a native person
from Georgia. This presentation will
take you on a journey about my life. I
always like to begin with a timeline.
Click on the tomahawk to begin
Click here to
listen to the
story
Tomochichi
Oglethorpe and the
Yamacraw
Map of Yamacraw
Bluff
James
Oglethorpe
Meeting with King
George II in England
Meeting between
Tomochichi, Oglethorpe
and Mary Musgrove
Meeting with King George
II in England
Tomochichi’s grave marker
Surveying Land
Original Layout of Savannah
Coweta
E
x
i
t
I have accomplished many things in my
long life. Click the picture below to read
about some of my accomplishments.
I was a skillful trader. We
did not use money to get the
things we needed. I traded
goods with King George II.
He gave me a gold watch
and I gave him 3 eagle
feathers. An eagle’s feather
is a symbol of peace. I also
gave one to my new friend
James Oglethorpe.
I assured other
Creek chieftains of
the honest
intensions of the
new settlers.
I started Yamacraw
Bluff a creek village
along the Savannah
River. People from
Creek and Yamasee
tribes joined together to
become Yamacraw.
Click the star to see the
map.
My good friend
James Oglethorpe
asked for my
assistance in
acting as a
mediator between
the English
settlers and the
Spanish.
I Helped to
create peaceful
relationships
between new
settlers and
nativepeople.
Oglethorpe and I
went on an
expedition to
surveythe
southern
boundariesof
Georgia.
In a Creek tribe the
women usually tend to
the crops. Foods like corn,
beans, squash, sweet
potatoes, and melons are
a large part of our diet.
To get around Yamacraw Bluff
we would have to travel in a
canoe. We built these ourselves.
Click the arrow to
continue.
Go back to
accomplishments
The native
population has
changed since
the 18th century.
Click the heart to
see a population
map from 1790.
Georgia Population Map of 1790
This map shows the approximate distribution of
Georgia's white and Native American population in
1790.
See how much of
Georgia was
Indian territory?
Now click on the
cross to see how
the population
has changed.
Population of Georgia as of 2008
Asian/Pacific
Islander
Hispanic
3%
7%
American Indian
4%
Afr. American
27%
As you can see
not many Native
Americans exist
in Georgia today.
This is very sad.
White
59%
Click
here for
another
look
Population in millions
7000000
6000000
5000000
4000000
3000000
2000000
Population in millions
1000000
0
Go to
Think
About It!
Accomplishments
Table of Contents
Accomplishments
To have been successful at something
Ambassador
An official messenger
Bluff
A high steep cliff
Boundaries
Dividing lines
Chieftains
A chief of a tribe or clan
Expedition
A trip with a specific goal in mind
Mediate
To help those arguing come to an
agreement
Native
Born in a particular place
Population
The amount of people living in a
certain area.
Survey
To study the size, shape and area of a
piece of land
Settlers
The first people from a certain group to
live in an area
Accomplishments
Table of
Contents
Maps
IMPORTANT DATES
1650
1728
Tomochichi
is born
1733
1734
Tomochichi
befriends James
Oglethorpe
Tomochichi
becomes chief
of the
Yamacraw
Take a look at my
accomplishments
1736
1739
Tomochichi and
Oglethorpe go on
an expedition to
map the Southern
boundaries
Tomochichi goes to
England with
James Oglethorpe
and acts as an
ambassador for the
Creek Indians.
Tomochichi passes
away at the age of
90
THINK ABOUT IT!
Discuss the following with your
group
• Where is your native
homeland?
• Have you ever had to
settle an argument between
friends?
• Have you ever offered
your friends or family
something special to show
them your care about them?
• What have you
accomplished in your life?
• Do you like to be a leader?
MY FRIENDS
Congratulations! You have
just completed your
interview with Tomochichi!
Click the home button to
find out what to do next!

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