Airmanship Pt 4

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Airmanship 2
Leading Cadet Training
Rules of the Air
Lecture
4
Introduction
Without the Highway Code cars on the road
would find it impossible to move about safely.
There are also rules to govern how aircraft
move about the sky, to avoid accidents.
They are called “Right of Way” rules.
Rights of Way
All other types of aircraft must
give way to balloons.
Gliders have right of way
over both powered aircraft
and airships.
Airships must give way to
both gliders and balloons.
Conventional powered aircraft
must give way to balloons, gliders
and airships.
Rights of Way
Everything gives way to balloons.
Airships & powered aircraft
give way to gliders.
Powered aircraft
give way to airships.
Powered aircraft give way to everything.
Rights of Way
When approaching head on,
each aircraft must alter course to the Starboard (Right).
Rights of Way
When on converging courses at the same height,
the aircraft with the other on its Starboard (Right)
must give way.
Rights of Way
When overtaking, the aircraft being overtaken
has the ‘right of way’.
The overtaking one must avoid by turning Right.
Rights of Way
Landing
An aircraft landing, or on final approach to land,
has right of way over aircraft in flight or on the ground.
Rights of Way
Landing
When two or more aircraft are approaching to land,
the lower one has right of way.
Rights of Way
On the Ground
Aircraft and vehicles being taxied give way to
aircraft being towed.
Vehicles not towing give way to aircraft being taxied.
Rules at Night
Navigation Lights:
Aircraft have different styles of Navigation Lights.
A balloon has one RED light
suspended 5 to 10 metres
below the basket.
Rules at Night
Navigation Lights:
Aircraft have different styles of Navigation Lights.
An airship in flight,
has WHITE lights fore & aft,
with GREEN on top
and RED below
A stationary airship,
has WHITE lights fore & aft,
with two RED lights
suspended below
Rules at Night
Navigation Lights:
Aircraft have different styles of Navigation Lights.
A glider has a central RED light
Rules at Night
Navigation Lights:
Aircraft have different styles of Navigation Lights.
Conventional powered aircraft
have a WHITE light at the rear,
a RED light to port and a GREEN light to starboard
Rules at Night
Converging:
If pilot (A) looks out to starboard
and sees a RED light moving alongside (B),
He knows that the other aircraft has right of way
and he must take action to avoid a collision.
Rules at Night
Converging:
Pilot (A) sees a GREEN light crossing port to
starboard, and knows pilot (B) should give way.
He must be aware that pilot (B) might not have seen
him and should be ready to take avoiding action.
Check Understanding
What must give way to a glider?
Only Powered Aircraft
Powered Aircraft and Airships
Only Airships
Everything
Check Understanding
What must give way to a powered aircraft?
Everything
Nothing
Balloons
Airships
Check Understanding
When approaching head on,
in which direction must aircraft alter course?
Starboard
Port
Upwards
Downwards
Check Understanding
Which of the following
do NOT have ‘Right of Way’?
An aircraft being overtaken.
An aircraft overtaking.
An aircraft landing,
over aircraft in flight.
An aircraft on final approach,
over an aircraft below.
Check Understanding
What navigation lights
does a stationary airship show?
One RED light suspended below
WHITE lights fore and aft,
with two RED lights suspended below.
Two RED lights suspended below
WHITE lights fore and aft,
with GREEN on top and RED below
Check Understanding
Conventional powered aircraft
have which navigation lights?
Green to port and Red to starboard
Red to port and Green to starboard
White to port and Red to starboard
Green to starboard and White to port
Check Understanding
If you look out to starboard and see
a RED light moving alongside,
what action should you take?
Take immediate avoiding action
Wait for the other aircraft
to take avoiding action
None, it’s a stationary airship
Expect the other aircraft to take avoiding action
But be ready to take action yourself.
Airmanship 2
Leading Cadet Training
End of Presentation

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