Transposition of Directive 2003/59/EC

Report
Pillar 1
Transposition of Directive 2003/59/EC
Final conference
Brussels,
April 3. & 4., 2012
AFT-IFTIM
1
Objectives of the study
Transposition and enforcement issues
Cooperation between social partners
• Proof of CPC & completion of periodic
training
• Mutual recognition of qualification
• Design of training
• Financing of training
• Follow-up of implementation
Directive
2003/59/EC
Organisation of training
Impact of the Directive
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Approval of training providers
Training programmes
Trainers profiles
Tests
Road safety
Fuel consumption
Drivers skills
Attractiveness of the profession
2
Methodology
European
survey
Literature
review
Interviews
Information
3
Dissemination and collection of the questionnaires
• 300 contacts representing:
– Authorities in charge of implementation
– Social partners
– Training providers
• 74 questionnaires collected from 22 member States but unevenly
filled
– 19 from Competent Authorities
– 36 from Social partners representatives
– 19 from training providers
• Member States not representated in the survey:
– Greece
– Ireland
– Latvia
– Malta
– Slovakia
4
Transposition has sometimes been a long process
5
A rhythm reflecting the need for stakeholders to
understand all the issues of Directive 2003/59/EC
• A temporal dimension explained not only by issues and
challenges to face with Directive 2003/59/EC :
– Sustainable mobility (road safety, fuel savings, …),
– drivers qualification,
– Attractivness of the profession, …:
• But also by characteristics of consultation and social
dialogue in Member States :
– A broad nature of the social dialogue in the sector that relies
mainly on tripartism;
– social dialogue in the road transport sector that is still in its early
stages on training issues mainly in the new Member States.
6
Consultation of social partners organised and
structured in some countries
• Consultation that has actually taken place with the
implementation of the Directive was mainly held at a
national level:
– Belgium, experts’ committee set up by the Service Public
Fédéral Mobilité et Transports;
– Finland, National working group set up by the Transport Ministry;
– France, Commission Nationale Paritaire pour l’Emploi et la
Formation
– UK, Stakeholder Group with various partners (Sector Skills
Councils, Trade Associations, Trade Unions etc.)
7
But non formalized in other Member States
• In new Member countries, the most important level of
collective bargaining is at company level, when it exists.
Social partners have been involved only from
implementation and enforcement process.
• Lack of formalization of social partners cooperation is
reflected in governance and monitoring of national
vocational training systems.
• However a general feeling from workers representatives
to not have been consulted during transposition and
implementation: Belgium, Bulgaria, Spain, Sweden
8
Consultation focused on a variety of topics
• Choice of the initial qualification:
– training + test;
– or test only.
• Choice for the recording of the qualification:
– code 95 on the driving license
– Issuance of a Driver qualification card.
• Training programme/
– uniform programme prepared by competent authority.
– or different programmes prepared by each training centre);
• Financing of training, …
9
Consultation of social partners has led to cooperation
Cooperation in designing
training programmes and
financing drivers training:
• In Finland, an automotive
and transport examining
commission has been
established to oversee
training
• No answer from Bulgaria,
Denmark, Germany,
Poland, Slovenia and UK
Member State
Designing the training
programmes
Financing the drivers
training
Austria

Belgium


France


Hungary

Lithuania

Luxemburg

Netherlands

Spain

Sweden

United Kingdom



10
• Austria
• Belgium
• Cyprus
• Finland
• Germany
• Latvia
• Luxemburg
• Malta
• Netherlands
• Poland
• Slovakia
• Slovenia
Driver qualification card
Driving licence (Code 95)
Recording of the qualification (1/2)
• Bulgaria
• Czech Republic
• Denmark
• Estonia
• Finland
• France
• Greece
• Hungary
• Ireland
• Italy
• Portugal
• Romania
• Slovenia
• Spain
• Sweden
• UK
11
Recording of the qualification (2/2)
• Some Member States have chosen both code 95 on the driving
licence and the Driver qualification card:
– In Germany and Luxemburg, code 95 is used for national or
resident drivers whereas drivers with foreign driving licence,
driver qualification card will be issued;
– In Finland, both options are possible, the most frequently used
being the mark on the driving licence.
• In Belgium, a certificate is issued when the driver does not hold a
Belgian or a European driving licence.
12
Initial qualification (1/2)
• The Directive 2003/59/EC offers
2 options for the system of
initial qualification:
•
Course attendance and test
• 280 hours training
• Accelerated initial training: 140
hours
15 Member States
•
Only tests
10 Member States
•
Both options
2 Member States
13
Initial qualification (1/2)
• In some Member States practices tend to move away from their
choices of initial qualification option.
• Romania
• The expensiveness of training and the lack of (public) funding
tend to discourage candidates from undergoing courses.
• Malta
• Training courses have been developed to improve success
rate to the test. Drivers with a minimum experience are
encouraged to undergo 90 hours training, less experienced
drivers are oriented to 140 hours training in training centres
approved by Transport Malta.
14
Periodic training
• Art 3 Directive 2003/59: Compulsory course attendance
• Art 7 Directive 2003/59: to update the knowledge (…), with specific
emphasis on road safety and the rationalisation of fuel consumption
• Organised by an approved training centre
• 35 hours every five years, given in periods at least 7 hours
15
Periodic training – Organisation
7-hour x 5
1 x 35 hours
• Czech
Republic
• Germany
• Italy
• Lithuania
• Netherlands
• Slovenia
• Spain
• Sweden
• United
Kingdom
• Bulgaria
• Denmark
• Estonia
• France
• Germany
• Hungary
• Lithuania
• Luxembourg
• Poland
• Romania
21h + 14 h
• Denmark
• France
Other
methods
• Germany
• Netherlands
• Finland
• Belgium
• United
Kingdom
• A wide variety of implemented periodic training: from 7 hours per year
during 5 years to a 35-hour unique session periodic training
• The Czech Republic has chosen the system of a 7-hour session per
year that avoids huge fluctuations from one year to another;
• In Germany, the organisation of the 35-hour PT is under the
responsability of each federal State (Bundesland);
• In France, the organisation (21h + 14h) is possible but rarely proposed.
16
Periodic training – Deadlines for the first periodic
training
• Most of Member States have defined 2013 as deadline for
completing periodic training sessions in the carriage of passengers
and 2014 in the carriage of goods.
2012
• Estonia
2013
• Austria
• Czech Republic
• Denmark
• Finland
• Germany
• Hungary
• Italy
• Lithuania
• Malta
• Poland
• Spain
• UK
2015
• Belgium
• Luxemburg
• Netherlands
• Portugal
• Spain
• Sweden
17
Opinion on completion of periodic training
- Most respondents are confident on completion of periodic training
on schedule, respondents from Slovenia and UK are skeptical
whereas a few ones (25%) have given no answer nor opinion.
- However some apprehension exists regarding the training
provision and potential bottlenecks just before the deadlines.
Some rules have been set in order to make sure drivers undergo
their training in a good time to avoid shortages on labour market and
penalties to drivers.
Some Member States have planned the periodic training according
to the age or birthdays of candidates or to the date of issuance of
driving licences, and some (Luxemburg) have even developed a
system of reminders sent to drivers.
18
Mutual recognition of qualification
Initial qualification:
Widespread acceptance of mutual recognition, except in Denmark,
Hungary, Lithuania and Sweden
UK: more than thirty cases of such recognition to Polish and Latvian
drivers in 2010.
Periodic training:
The 35-hour periodic training must be entirely undergone in one
single Member State to be recognized, sometimes under conditions
that information could be checked.
Sweden does not recognize initial qualification nor periodic training.
The recognition of a partial periodic training is more problematic: to
this date, no information system exists, so Authorities are reluctant
to accept periodic training certificates.

similar documents