Marzano Evaluation Rubric Workshop Presentation

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Marzano Evaluation Rubric Workshop
September 23rd
Santa Rosa, FL
Amy Gropper, MS, NBCT
[email protected]
Learning Goals
Today you will gain a stronger
understanding of and comfort level
with the Santa Rosa Marzano
Teacher
Evaluation Rubric.
Norms
We will share our ideas and be open to other’s
ideas with active listening
We will be respectful and professional.
We will put technology on manner mode as
appropriate.
We will be prepared to participate and be
engaged.
Schedule
8:00 Workshop begins
Mid-Morning Break – 10 min.
11:30 – 12:30 Lunch
Mid-Afternoon Break – 10 min.
3:00 Workshop ends
Parking Lot  
Feel free to write any thoughts,
comments or questions on a Post-it
note and place it on the Parking Lot
page by the door.
Begin at the beginning…
Florida has mandated a new evaluation
criteria
Each district will create their own version
using Marzano or Danielson
Santa Rosa has chosen Marzano.
Begin at the beginning…
Marzano presents 4 domains leading to
student achievement
1 = Classroom Strategies and Behaviors
2 = Planning and Preparing
3 = Reflecting on Teaching
4 = Collegiality and Professionalism
Well-Articulated Knowledge Base for
Teaching
Begin at the beginning…
Focused Feedback
Opportunities to Observe and Discuss
Expertise
Clear Criteria and Plan for Success
Recognition of Expertise
Begin at the beginning…
Santa Rosa has used 11 elements from
Domain 1 of Marzano’s design based on 9
Instructional Design Questions.
These will frame the criteria through which
teachers will be evaluated.
Let’s take a look…
Let’s talk about the measurement scale…
Highly Effective
Perfectly &/or
expertly executed
– nothing missing
v. Effective
Element present,
but lacking in
detail or clarity - “I
like the direction
of this lesson, but
it would be more
effective if…”
v. Developing
An attempt at
element has been
made, but not
adequate
What is the teacher doing? What are the students doing?
Remember…
You ARE the teacher, but you
are not the practice of
teaching!
Try to distinguish between
what you do (or don’t do) in
the classroom, and who you
are!
Addressing Content
Addressing Content
What will you do to help students
effectively interact with new knowledge?
What will you do to help students practice
and deepen new knowledge?
What will you do to help students generate
and test hypotheses about new
knowledge?
(both organizing and engaging)
What will you do to provide students with
resources and guidance?
Interacting with New Knowledge
“What is needed…is a comprehensive approach that
allows for student construction of meaning while
interacting with the content, the teacher, and other
students.” (Marzano, 2007)
Critical-Input experiences (designed input
activities) – these are the learning experiences
considered critical to understanding content should be identified and highlighted by teachers
What will you do to help students effectively interact with new
knowledge?
Interacting with New Knowledge
What are the strategies suggested?
Previewing
Small Chunks
Macrostrategies
Summarizing and note-taking
Nonlinguistic representations
Questioning
Reflection
Cooperative Learning
What will you do to help students effectively interact with new
knowledge?
Interacting with New Knowledge
Do This:
Read one of these strategies from the handouts on
your table.
When done, introduce the strategy to your table –
make sure you give an example
Share Out
What will you do to help students effectively interact with new
knowledge?
Long-Term Knowledge Retention
starts with organized practice
What is the purpose of grouping students?
Is there ONE way to group?
What are the benefits?
What will you do to help students practice and deepen new knowledge?
Organized practice…
Do This:
Think of your favorite group procedure and
related activity.
Please write it down and swap papers with
someone in your group.
Now, read your paper aloud to your group one
at a time.
Choose one to share with the larger group.
Share Out
What will you do to help students practice and deepen new knowledge?
What is hypothesis generation and
how does it look in the classroom?
Making an educated guess or prediction about an
outcome and then trying to confirm or disconfirm it!
Project based
Comprehensive
Student-centered with teacher as facilitator
Do This:
Take a moment to think about a student-centered
project you do with your students.
Are students ‘generating a hypothesis?
Are they seeking to prove or disprove something?
SO, what does it look like?
Complete a science lab where
students first make a prediction
based on observation (Think
Mythbusters!)
A language arts teacher
asks students to rewrite
a paragraph without
using any conjunctions,
first predicting how the
lack of conjunctions will
affect their writing and
meaning.
After discussing the
impact of the social
upheaval of the 60s, a
teacher might ask what
students would predict
that generation is like
now. Would their past
experience impact their
present behavior?
Different Types of Inquiry
1. Experimental Inquiry – involves observation
first
1. Problem-Solving Tasks – use knowledge in an
unusual context or with constraints
1. Decision-Making Tasks – using a matrix along
with research
1. Investigation Tasks – Testing hypotheses
about past, present, or future events (What
really happened? What would happen if….)
1. Student designed tasks
Let’s return to the rubric
Do This:
1. Find the two elements focused on students
generating hypotheses.
2. Read complete scales for both elements
3. Underline distinguishing words
4. With a partner, discuss a hypotheses generating
activity and appropriate grouping strategy you might
do in your class. (3 min.)
5. Go to another table and share out. (4 min.)
6. Be prepared to share ideas whole group and
discuss.
What will you do to help students generate and test hypotheses about new
knowledge? (organizing & engaging)
Providing resources and guidance
Available
Approachable
Interact
Enjoy
Volunteers all available resources
What will you do to provide students with resources and guidance?
Debrief
What did you notice?
Did you see any of the Addressing Content
elements?
Problem-Solving Tasks – use knowledge in an
unusual context or with constraints
Does this look like something you do with your
students? 
Enacted on the Spot
Enacted on the Spot
What will you do to recognize and acknowledge
adherence or lack of adherence to rules and
procedures? (with-it-ness and consequences)
What will you do to communicate high expectations
for all students?
Enacted on the Spot
Recognize and acknowledge adherence or lack
of adherence to rules and procedures
(consequences)?
NEED:
Consistency
Fairness
Verbal and Non-Verbal
Student believes the teacher appreciates his/her
good behavior.
Bad behavior ≠ Bad child
What will you do to recognize and acknowledge adherence or lack of
adherence to rules and procedures? (consequences)
Enacted on the Spot
Recognize and acknowledge adherence or lack of
adherence to rules and procedures (with-it-ness)
Eyes in the back of your head
Choose your battles
Eye contact
Professional & proactive
What will you do to recognize and acknowledge adherence or lack of
adherence to rules and procedures? (with-it-ness)
Enacted on the Spot
Communicate high expectations for all students
Engages ALL learners
Require same level of thinking skill
equally
Provides both non-verbal and verbal
cues
Students believe the teacher cares and does
not allow negative comments.
A word about expectations…
What will you do to communicate high expectations for all students?
Let’s return to the rubric…
1. Find the three Enacted on the Spot elements.
2. Read complete scales for both elements
3.Underline distinguishing words
Story Time!
Do This:
Think of a time when you witnessed a teacher
who demonstrated with-it-ness, fairness, and high
expectations.
Share with your table group what that person did
to demonstrate these things. What were the
behaviors you could point at and say, “There!
That’s _____!”
Develop a list of these behaviors at your table (on
chart paper) and be ready to post that list when
time is called. (12 -15 minutes)
Modified 5E Template
Santa Rosa/Marzano Evaluation Rubric
Lesson Plan graphic organizer to help you plan
Routine Events
What will I do to establish and
communicate learning goals, track
student progress, and celebrate
success?
Let’s return to the rubric and identify
some distinguishing language…
Routine Events
Learning Goals
Know
Understand
Do/Be able to…
OR
Emphasize the KNOWLEDGE that students
will potentially gain
Establish and communicate learning goals, track student progress, and
celebrate success.
Goal or No Goal?
Students will…
1. successfully complete activity 3a at the
end of ch.3.
2. be able to determine subject/verb
agreement
3. understand the relationship between
organisms
4. investigate the defining characteristics of
fables and fairy tales
So, what are these?
Students will…
1. successfully complete activity 3a at the
end of ch.3. ACTIVITY
2. be able to determine subject/verb
agreement
3. understand the relationship between
organisms
4. investigate the defining characteristics of
fables and fairy tales ACTIVITY
Learning Goals & Activities
Do This:
With your group, please generate
1. A list of goal stems you hope to see in
your classrooms
2. A list of activity stems or verbs you
might expect to see students doing.
Establish and communicate learning goals, track student progress, and
celebrate success.
Student Progress
Once you have established the target (goal), students
must have a way of measuring their progress toward
that target if they are to improve.
More formative assessments = higher student achievement
(Assessments must tie back to the learning goal & be
scored according to the rubric/scale!)
Research by Fuchs & Fuchs (1986) shows that 2
formative assessments/week resulted in a 30 point
%ile gain in student achievement!
Establish and communicate learning goals, track student progress, and
celebrate success
About formative assessments…
“Formative assessment is a process used by teachers and
students during instruction that provides explicit feedback to
adjust ongoing teaching and learning to improve students’
achievement of intended instructional outcomes. Formative
assessment is a method of continually evaluating students’
academic needs and development within the classroom and
precedes local benchmark assessments and state-mandated
summative assessments.”
“In order to show students how to close the gap between where
they are academically and where they want to be, teachers
must help students evaluate their progress in the learning
process and give them explicit, descriptive feedback specific to
the learning task.”
Coffey, H. (2009). Formative Assessment. Learn NC: K-12 Teaching and Learning. Retrieved from
http://www.learnnc.org/lp/pages/5212.
Establish and communicate learning goals, track student progress, and
celebrate success
Formative Assessment
What does it look like?
Thumbs up/down
Exit Card
Oral Questioning
Quiz
Journal Entry
Student Conference
Summary
Observation
Self- & Peer-Assessment
What else?
Establish and communicate learning goals, track student progress, and
celebrate success
Formative Assessments
Sample Learning Goal:
Students will understand the major events leading
up to the development of the atomic bomb, starting
with Einstein’s publication of the theory of special
relativity in 1905 and ending with the development
of the two bombs Little Boy and Fat Man in 1945.
What formative assessments (both formal and
informal) might you assign to gauge student
progress toward the above goal?
Establish and communicate learning goals, track student progress, and
celebrate success
What about the Rubric?
Learning Goal
Rubric or Scale to assess
mastery of learning goal
You don’t need a rubric for EVERY formative assessment you do!
Celebrating Success
Do This:
With a partner, create a list of what celebrating
success looks like in your classroom. What should
one expect to see during a classroom visit?
Be ready to share with the group.
Establish and communicate learning goals, track student progress, and
celebrate success
Putting it together…(Part 1)
Do This:
Think of a unit of instruction coming up.
Using your modified 5E template, complete the 2nd
box, filling in your Unit Overview, Learning Goal,
etc.
When you are done, share with the group.
Let’s Review the categories and
elements…
Routine Events
Learning Goals
Student Progress
Celebrating Success
Addressing Content
Interacting with new knowledge
Practice and deepen new knowledge
Organizing and engaging in hypothesis generating & testing
Providing resources and guidance
Enacted on the Spot
With-it-ness
Rules & Procedures and applying consequences
Demonstrating value and respect
Reflection Questions will help guide discussion of teaching practice
Using the planning tool…
How might you use this graphic organizer to make
sure you are addressing the elements?
Look closely at the different E’s, and see if there’s a
connection you can make…
(Hint – There is no one right answer…the organizer
and the rubric both allow for change and a dynamic
classroom.)
Planning Tool
Do This:
With your table, go through the elements and jot down
where the different elements might be seen in the
planning tool.
(For example, the Unit Overview box will most closely
correlate to your Routine Events elements.)
Write one or two examples as you work through the tool.
Lesson Study & Rubric “roll-out”
What is Lesson Study?
How will you present the Marzano
rubric to your colleagues back at your
school. How will you help them feel
confident about it (or at least more
comfortable)?
Wrapping up
Was the learning goal accomplished today?
Today you will gain a stronger
understanding of and comfort level
with the Santa Rosa Marzano Teacher
Evaluation Tool.
Final thoughts
Let’s return to the Parking Lot…
Please write one additional comment.
Make a comment regarding the effectiveness of
this workshop AND/OR one important thing
you’ve learned or strategy you will implement.
Thank you!
Amy Gropper
[email protected]

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