Backing Up the BUs

Report
BACKING UP
THE BUS
Canyons School District
Bus PBIS Implementation
Allan.whitmore@canyonsdistrict.org
Eden.steffey@canyonsdistrict.org
BACKGROUND
 Working the last four years to get PBIS up and running in all of
Canyons School District elementary schools
 End of 3rd year a school who had experienced a lot of success
with PBIS called and asked for assistance with PBIS on the BUS
 District PBIS team liked the idea. The team approached district
administration and got approval to present the idea to our
elementary school principals
 Principals gave us the go ahead and said they would support us
with teaching BUS rules at their school and following up with
reinforcement
 Contact was then made with the Transportation Department. . .
THE MERGING OF TWO WORLDS
We had to merge two systems
 Bus drivers do not have district email
 Bus drivers have no formal training on behavior management
 Bus driver’s are on a tight timeline
 Training and routes
 The norm for the bus driver’s is “We drive students safely to school. That is
our job.”
 Many bus driver’s don’t see behavior as being a part of their job
 Bus driver’s don’t have natural feedback loops
 Teachers and administrators do not know what bus regulations are
 Parents, Teachers and administrators rarely take time to look at things from
the bus driver’s point of view
 Nobody backs up the bus driver
3%
5-10%
There
are
80-85%
Green Zone
Students
BUS EXPECTATIONS MATRIX
TO CHANGE A BEHAVIOR….
RESEARCH SHOWS A PERSON
NEEDS TO HAVE MORE THEN 4
POSITIVES TO EVERY NEGATIVE
RESEARCH ALSO SHOWS
PUNISHMENT ALONE DOES NOT
CHANGE BEHAVIOR
THE DRIVER’S SIDE
Students Don’t
Follow Rules
Bad Bus Vibes
Driver has to
Enforce Rules,
Deliver
Consequences,
and
Communicate
with School
Bus Driver Stress
Goes Up
Driving Becomes
More Difficult
THE PASSENGER’S SIDE
Bad Bus Vibes
Students Act Out
Because They Don’t
Follow the Rules, Feel
Unsafe or Have
Disabilities
Consequences on the
Bus May Lead to Loss of
Academic Time
Riding the Bus Becomes
Unpleasant for Most
CSD 2011-2013 DATA
Discipline Offenses
On the bus or at the bus stop
10
High
16
84
Middle
2011-12
2012-13
67
117
Elementary
90
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
FOUR PILLARS OF PBIS
 Establish Expectations
 Should be stated & taught positively
 Explicitly Teach Expectations
 Make sure that ALL students understand the rules, and have a chance to practice desired
behaviors.
 Reteach expectations and re-practice desired behaviors when problem behaviors spike, or
when they might be expected to spike (i.e. holidays)
 Reinforce Expectations
 Catch students doing the things you want them to be doing, and acknowledge them in front of
their peers.
 Prevent problem behaviors from occurring by increasing positive reinforcement to those who
are doing it right.
 Correct Problem Behavior
 Consistently follow problem behavior correction protocol
 Use the least amount of punishment as possible, and always have the students practice the
correct behavior to ensure that they understand what they should be doing.
ESTABLISH
EXPECTATIONS
ESTABLISH EXPECTATIONS
FOR ALL STUDENTS
Be Responsible
Use Respect
Stay Safe
BUS EXPECTATIONS MATRIX
TEACH
EXPECTATIONS
WHY TAKE TIME TO TEACH
EXPECTATIONS?
If a child doesn’t know how to read . . . We teach.
If a child doesn’t know how to swing . . . We teach.
If a child doesn’t know how to multiply . . . We teach.
If a child doesn’t know how to drive . . . We teach.
If a child doesn’t know how to behave . . . we _______
 ……...Teach?
……….Punish?
Why can’t we finish the last sentence as automatically
as we do the others?
TEACH EXPECTATIONS
Schools teach BUS expectations at the beginning
of the year using the matrix and lesson plans
Drivers are encouraged to re-teach and repractice as needed, particularly when behavior
problems spike, or when behavior problems are
most likely to spike (i.e. before holidays, spring
break, etc.)
The more positive the re-teaching, the more
impactful it will be!
REINFORCE
EXPECTATIONS
BUILD RELATIONSHIPS
Nobody cares how much you know, until they
know how much you care.
Theodore Roosevelt
 Learn the student’s names
 Greet them as they enter and exit the bus
 Ask brief questions about their activities
 Show interest in student activities and big events
 Share your interests with the students
 Allow your personality to show on the bus
Use “I noticed . . . “ statements to engage
students who have not engaged otherwise
REINFORCE EXPECTATIONS
 Give positive feedback consistently
 Have fun
 Mix up the reward system as needed
Ideas:
 Build a “District Bus Driver Toolbox”
 Verbal praise
 Bus Bucks – schools have agreed to accept bus bucks and incorporate
them into their rewards systems
 Special Seat
 Talk on the PA
 First one off the Bus
CONTINUUM OF REINFORCEMENT
Natural Success
Nod, wink, etc.
“Thanks”
Public Acknowledgement
Token Acknowledgement
Privileges
Tangibles
 Small to Large
BUS BUCK SAMPLE
CORRECT
PROBLEM
BEHAVIOR
MAJOR VS. MINOR BEHAVIORS
Majors:
• Repeated Minor
Offenses
• Fighting
• Vandalism
• Unacceptable
Conduct/Insubordination
• Harassment/Bullying
• Inappropriate Language
Towards Bus Driver
• Inappropriate materials
• Weapons
• Stealing
Minors:
Disruptive Behavior
Property Misuse
Inappropriate language
Arguments
Eat/Drink when not
appropriate
• Failure to keep the bus
clean
• Failure to remain seated
• Hanging out the Window
•
•
•
•
•
HANDLING BEHAVIORS
 Flow Chart
MINOR BEHAVIOR VIOLATIONS FORM
WHAT DOES CORRECTING PROBLEM
BEHAVIOR LOOK LIKE?
“Have I ensured the students know this
expectation?”
 If no, Re-teach
If yes, Consider:
 Verbal Warning
 Seat Assignment
 Last Off the Bus
 Inform Student You’ll be Speaking
with the Principal
BUS
REFERRAL
SLIP
WHAT WE’VE LEARNED
 Support of the Transportation Department is ESSENTIAL
 Especially the Director
 Feedback loop to keep bus drivers informed
 Bus drivers need to be reinforced by schools and district
 Schools have to follow-through with reinforcement and
consequences
 Schools have to be trained on how to teach expectations and use
the lesson plans
 Schools and district personnel need to know bus driver policy
 Just as time is scarce for educators, time is scarce for bus drivers
 Bus drivers and schools typically don’t have a good working
relationship (hopefully not in your district)
 Majority of problems could be handled if principals scheduled
time to meet with bus drivers

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