Presentation

Report
Next Generation Science
Standards:
Looking Back, Moving Forward
Groundhog day…Over
Looking Back
Sounded like a good idea at the time
Drilling Down
Fishing For Feedback
Remembering Why…
Trying to stay out of…
January Feedback
 Concerns that there was still too much material
 Suggestions for a few additional topics to include
 Increase language clarity
 Concerns about including and addressing
engineering and technology
 Concern about the amount of support that will be
needed for implementation of the standards.
 Confusion about the coding/naming of the
performance expectations.
Response to Feedback
 A review of the central focus of each disciplinary core idea (DCI) from the
Framework resulted in the removal of about 33% of the performance expectations
and associated DCIs, while retaining the progression of DCIs across the grade
bands.
 Engineering Design Standards
 “Storylines” with guiding questions were added to the beginning of each grade
band and section to describe the context and rationale for the performance
expectations.
 The “All Standards, All Students” appendix was expanded to include several
vignettes about implementation of the NGSS with diverse student groups.
 Performance expectations names were changed from lowercase letters to
numbers to avoid confusion with the DCI names (e.g. MS-LS1-a became MS-LS11.
What’s Different about the Next
Generation Science Standards?
Conceptual Shifts in the NGSS
1. K-12 Science Education Should Reflect the Interconnected Nature of
Science as it is Practiced and Experienced in the Real World.
2. The Next Generation Science Standards are student performance
expectations – NOT curriculum.
3. The science concepts build coherently from K-12.
4. The NGSS Focus on Deeper Understanding of Content as well as
Application of Content.
5. Science and Engineering are Integrated in the NGSS from K–12.
6. NGSS content is focused on preparing students for the next generation
workforce.
7. The NGSS and Common Core State Standards ( English Language
Arts and Mathematics) are Aligned.
Three Dimensions Intertwined
 The NGSS are written as
Performance Expectations
 NGSS will require
contextual application of
the three dimensions by
students.
 Focus is on how and why
as well as what
Weaving Practices with Content – Not
Just the NGSS
 K-12 Science Education Framework
 New Advanced Placement Coursework and
Assessment
 PISA 2015
 Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology
 A New Biology for the 21st Century
 Scientific Foundations for Future Physicians
How do we know this approach works?
4 strands
Motivation and
Engagement
6 strands – incorporates
affective domain
Goals of Laboratory Experiences based
on ALR Findings
 Mastery of subject matter.
 Developing scientific reasoning.
 Understanding the complexity and ambiguity of
empirical work.
 Developing practical skills.
 Interest in science and science learning.
Currently, research indicates significant numbers of
students do not have quality opportunities to
engage in science and engineering practices
Findings from ALR
Typical Lab Practice
 Content Mastery
 No better or worse than other
modes of instruction.
 Scientific Reasoning
 Aids development of some aspects
 Interest in Science
 Some evidence of increased
interest.
Integrated Dimensions
 Content Mastery
 Increased mastery of subject
matter compared to other modes of
instruction.
 Scientific Reasoning
 Aids development of more
sophisticated aspects
 Interest in Science
 Strong evidence of increased
interest.
Science and Engineering Practices,
Not just teaching strategies
 Science and Engineering Practices are how
scientific knowledge is acquired
 While Practices should be used in instruction, all
students need to demonstrate achievement in their
use and application
Progressing to Understanding
K-2
PS1.A
Structure of
matter
3-5
Objects can be
built up from
smaller parts.
Because matter exists as
Matter exists as particles that are too small
different
to see, matter is always
substances that conserved even if it seems
have observable
to disappear,
different
Measurements of a variety
properties.
of observable properties
Different
can be used to identify
properties are
particular substances.
suited to different
purposes.
6-8
9-12
The fact that matter is
composed of atoms and
molecules can be used to
explain the properties of
substances, diversity of
materials, states of matter,
phase changes, and
conservation of matter.
The sub-atomic structural model
and interactions between electric
charges at the atomic scale can
be used to explain the structure
and interactions of matter,
including chemical reactions.
Repeating patterns of the
periodic table reflect patterns of
outer electrons. A stable
molecule has less energy than
the same set of atoms
separated; one must provide at
least this energy in order to take
the molecule apart.
Building Understanding in Middle
School – Concept Bundling
Matter and Its Interactions
The fact that matter is composed of atoms and
molecules can be used to explain the properties of
substances, diversity of materials, states of
matter, phase changes, and conservation of
matter.
MS-PS1-1. Develop molecular-level models to
describe the atomic composition of, and differences
between, simple molecules and extended structures.
MS-PS1-2. Analyze and interpret data on the
properties of substances before and after they
interact to determine if a chemical reaction has
occurred.
Reacting substances rearrange to form
different molecules, but the number of
atoms is conserved. Some reactions
release energy and others absorb
energy.
MS-PS1-3. Gather and make sense of information to
describe that synthetic materials come from natural resources
and impact society.
MS-PS1-4. Develop a model that predicts and describes the
changes in atomic motion caused by adding or removing
thermal energy from a pure substance and that result in either
a temperature change or change of state.
MS-PS1-5. Develop and use a model to describe a
 Within this DCI, 4 of the 8 Practices are
mechanism of atoms rearranging during a chemical reaction
highlighted. For instruction, additional practices
to show that atoms, and therefore mass, are conserved.
would be used to build toward these understandings.
MS-PS1-6. Undertake a design project to construct, test, and
modify a device that either releases or absorbs thermal
energy by chemical processes.*
Bundling, its what for understanding
 Teaching, or attempting to teach, individual
performance expectations lead to a disjointed and
stunted view of science.
 Developing instructional materials and instruction
should be viewed as leading to understanding the
larger core idea
 Coherent instructional materials and instruction
should focus on a Disciplinary Core Idea (or set of
them) rather than discrete pieces that are never
tied together.
Instructional Bundling – HS Physical
Sciences
Instructional Unit: Conservation and Interactions of Matter
PS1: Matter
PS2: Forces
HS-PS1-1. Use the periodic table as a model to predict
the relative properties of elements based on the patterns
of electrons in the outermost energy level of atoms.
HS-PS2-6. Communicate
scientific and technical
information about why the
molecular-level structure is
important in the functioning
of designed materials.
HS-PS1-2. Construct and revise an explanation for the
outcome of a simple chemical reaction based on the
outermost electron states of atoms, trends in the periodic
table, and knowledge of the patterns of chemical
properties.
HS-PS1-4. Develop and use a model to illustrate that the
release or absorption of energy from a chemical system
depends upon the changes in total bond energy.
HS-PS1-5. Apply scientific principles and evidence to
provide an explanation about the effects of changing the
temperature or concentration of the reacting particles on
the rate at which a reaction occurs.
MS-PS1-7. Use mathematical representations to support
the claim that atoms, and therefore mass, are conserved
during a chemical reaction.
PS3: Energy
HS-PS1-3. Develop and use models to
illustrate that the different forms of
energy, both at the microscopic and
macroscopic scale, can be accounted
for as either motions of particles or
energy stored in fields.
 Instructional Units should be
developed with these
performances as the end point or
target.
 Instruction should also connect
these performances with the
Disciplinary Core Idea
Instructional Bundling – HS Physical
Sciences
Instructional Unit: Conservation and Interactions of Matter
PS1: Matter
PS2: Forces
PS3: Energy
HS-PS1-1. Use the periodic table as a model to
predict the relative properties of elements based on the
patterns of electrons in the outermost energy level of
atoms.
HS-PS2-6. Communicate
scientific and technical
information about why the
molecular-level structure is
important in the functioning
of designed materials.
HS-PS1-3. Develop and use models
to illustrate that the different forms of
energy, both at the microscopic and
macroscopic scale, can be accounted
for as either motions of particles or
energy stored in fields.
HS-PS1-2. Construct and revise an explanation for the
outcome of a simple chemical reaction based on the
outermost electron states of atoms, trends in the periodic
table, and knowledge of the patterns of chemical
properties.
HS-PS1-4. Develop and use a model to illustrate that
the release or absorption of energy from a chemical
system depends upon the changes in total bond energy.
HS-PS1-5. Apply scientific principles and evidence to
provide an explanation about the effects of changing
the temperature or concentration of the reacting particles
on the rate at which a reaction occurs.
HS-PS1-7. Use mathematical representations to
support the claim that atoms, and therefore mass, are
conserved during a chemical reaction.
 Within this instructional unit, 4 of the
eight practices are highlighted in the
standards.
 Classroom instruction should use
additional practices to allow students to
fully engage in the learning
 The classroom instruction should have
students ask questions, use
investigations and analyze data to
develop the explanations.
Looking Ahead
Future Support for NGSS
 Form NGSS Network to support state adoption and
implementation
 Clarify and communicate meaning of College and
Career Readiness, STEM readiness with respect to
NGSS
 Provide tools and guidance to states and the field
to build capacity to deliver NGSS in the classroom
 Accountability and Assessment
 Communications and Coalition Building
NGSS Network
 Designed to build upon BCSSE and Lead State
initiative
 CSSS full partner in the network
 Annual meeting for all participating states
(February)
 Smaller working groups during the year focused on
specific issues such as policy and accountability
 Adoption/Implementation Planning Support
College, Career, STEM Readiness
 Additional Model Course Maps including AP and
CTE Pathways
 Environmental Scan of existing course pathways in
science
 Entry level course analytics in 2-, 4-, technical
college and university
 STEM Career analysis
 Policy recommendations in science
Building Capacity
 Science EQuIP Rubric
 Publisher’s Criteria
 Develop criteria for quality science education PD
that could be used in a rubric
 Model Curriculum Frameworks
 STEM Works
Assessment and Accountability
 Identifying appropriate indicators for accountability in
science
 Sample public reporting and related guidance
 Briefing of assessment vendors
 Research access versus interest of students
 Research state course taking data
 Support to states to set goals for science
impact/achievement
 Underserved populations and incentives
 Cross Network exploratory meeting to discuss interest,
timelines, etc. related to assessment
Communications and Coalition Building
 Fact Sheets
 Case Making Support
 Legislative/stakeholder briefing material
 Business and third party coalition building
 General communications support
Seriously…
Thank You
But, now the fun starts
“The how thinker gets problems solved effectively
because he wastes no time with futile ifs.”
-Norman Vincent Peale

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