Matt Zatorski_Leadership_Styles - George Pocock Rowing Foundation

Report
A Toolkit for Change
Utilizing Different Leadership Styles to Leverage Results
Matt Zatorski
Coordinator
Institute for Rowing Leadership
A Toolkit for Change
 Hello, my name is Matt…
 Introduction – Leadership… What is it?
 Part I – Emotional Intelligence
 Part II – Styles of Leadership
 Part III – A Roadmap to Personal Development
LEADERSHIP
What are we talking about?
One Definition: Transformational
Leadership
 Transformational leaders are those who stimulate
and inspire followers to both achieve extraordinary
outcomes and, in the process, develop their own
leadership capacity. (Bass, 1985)
 More evidence has been accumulated to
demonstrate that transformational leadership can
move followers to exceed expected performance
(Bass, 1985, 1998).
The Pervasive Myth of Leadership
“She is a born leader.”
 Leadership develops through hard work and
careful observation.
 Forsyth, D. R. (2009). Group dynamics (5th ed.).
Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole.
Emotional Intelligence (EI)
 Defining Emotional Intelligence
 Four Fundamental Capabilities
 Corresponding Competencies
 Developmental Processes
Emotional Intelligence
 Being aware of…




How we feel
How other’s feel
Why we feel that way
What we can do about it
Emotional Intelligence: A Primer
 Emotional intelligence is not about being nice all
the time.
 It’s about being honest.
 Emotional intelligence is not about being touchyfeely.
 It is about being aware of your feelings, and those of
others.
 Emotional intelligence is not about being
emotional.
 It is about being smart with your emotions.
Emotional Intelligence: A Primer
Relating to Ourselves
Relating to Others
 Self-Awareness
 Social Awareness
 Self-Management
 Social Skill
Self-Awareness
The ability to read one's
emotions and recognize their
impact while using gut feelings
to guide decisions.
• Emotional selfawareness
• Accurate selfassessment
• Self-confidence
Learn the difference between
thoughts and feelings.
Becoming More SelfAware
Ask yourself how
you’re feeling
throughout the day
and be honest.
Be open to
input from
others
Self-Management
Involves controlling one's
emotions and impulses and
adapting to changing
circumstances.
•
•
•
•
•
Self-control
Trustworthiness
Conscientiousness
Adaptability
Achievement
Orientation
• Initiative
Monitor your self talk.
Be aware of how you
explain setbacks to
yourself… Be realistic!
Connect your goals to
your values to get
energized.
Accept responsibility for
your emotional
responses in the
workplace.
Remove yourself from
the situation and keep
moving.
Strive for reaching a
“flow” state while
working on projects.
Anticipate the emotional
“triggers” and prepare
to manage them.
Never underestimate the
power of taking deep
breaths.
Visualization
Reframe an irritating
situation in to a problem
solving exercise.
Use humor!
Keep Learning
Monitor your self talk.
Be aware of how you
explain setbacks to
yourself… Be realistic!
Connect your goals to
your values to get
energized.
Accept responsibility for
your emotional
responses in the
workplace.
Remove yourself from
the situation and keep
moving.
Strive for reaching a
“flow” state while
working on projects.
Anticipate the emotional
“triggers” and prepare
to manage them.
Never underestimate
the power of taking
deep breaths.
Visualization
Reframe an irritating
situation in to a problem
solving exercise.
Use humor!
Keep Learning
Social Awareness
The ability to sense,
understand, and react to others'
emotions while comprehending
social networks.
Be consistent so that
your spoken and
unspoken messages
match.
Take the kinder road
whenever possible.
• Empathy
• Organizational
Awareness
Share and be
honest about
your feelings
Try to see from the
other person’s
perspective
• Service Orientation
Developing
Social
Awareness
Social Skill
Share your
passion and
enthusiasm for
your job and the
organization’s
vision—it’s
contagious!
The ability to inspire, influence,
and develop others while
managing conflict.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Visionary Leadership
Influence
Developing Others
Communication
Change Catalyst
Conflict Management
Building Bonds
Teamwork and
Collaboration
Be willing to
coach or mentor
others and be
open to being
coached
yourself.
How to build
relationships
Engage in
creative
brainstorming.
Create an
inspiring
work
environment
6 Styles of Leadership
 Coercive, Authoritative, Affiliative,
Democratic, Pacesetting, Coaching




Leader’s MO
What they say
Underlying EI Competencies
Situational Applications
Coercive
Leader’s
modus
operandi
Demands immediate
compliance
In other
words…
“Do what I tell you.”
Underlying
emotional
intelligence
competencies
Drive to achieve, initiative,
self-control
Works best…
In a crisis, to kick start a
turnaround, or with
problem athletes/staff
Authoritative
Leader’s
modus
operandi
Mobilizes people toward a
vision
In other
words…
“Come with me.”
Underlying
emotional
intelligence
competencies
Self-confidence, empathy,
change catalyst
Works best…
When change requires a
new vision, or when clear
direction is needed
Affiliative
Leader’s
modus
operandi
Creates harmony and
builds emotional bonds
In other
words…
“People come first.”
Underlying
emotional
intelligence
competencies
Empathy, building
relationships,
communication
Works best…
To heal rifts in a team, or
to motivate people during
stressful circumstances
Democratic
Leader’s
modus
operandi
Forges consensus through
participation
In other
words…
“What do you think?”
Underlying
emotional
intelligence
competencies
Collaboration, team
leadership,
communication
Works best…
To build buy-in or
consensus, or to get input
from valuable
athletes/staff
Pacesetting
Leader’s
modus
operandi
Sets high standards fro
performance
In other
words…
“Do as I do, now.”
Underlying
emotional
intelligence
competencies
Conscientiousness, drive
to achieve, initiative
Works best…
To get quick results from a
highly motivated and
competent team
Coaching
Leader’s
modus
operandi
Develops people for the
future
In other
words…
“Try this.”
Underlying
emotional
intelligence
competencies
Developing others,
empathy, emotional selfawareness
Works best…
To help an athlete/staff
member improve
performance or develop
long-term strengths
Coercive Authoritative
Affiliativ
e
Democratic Pacesetting
Coaching
Flexibility
-.28
.32
.27
.28
-.07
.17
Responsibility
-.37
.21
.16
.23
.04
.08
Standards
.02
.38
.31
.22
-.27
.39
Rewards
1.18
.54
.48
.42
-.29
.43
Clarity
-.11
.44
.37
.35
-.28
.38
Commitment
-.13
.35
.34
.26
-.20
.27
OVERALL
-.26
.54
.46
.43
-.25
.42
Where do I go from here?
Self Evaluation
Action Planning
 Assessment and discovery
 Capitalize on your own
strengths
 Identify areas for growth
 Be honest and objective
about your skills and abilities
 Prepare an Action Plan
 Make goals achievable and
measurable
 Don’t overwhelm yourself!
Take on one or two areas for
improvement at a time
 Review and make changes to
your plan as needed
Where do I go from here?
Practice New Skills and
Behaviors
 Practice in a safe
environment
 Partner w/someone who will
give you constructive
feedback on your progress
 Don’t go back… FULL
STEAM AHEAD!
Evaluate Your Success
 Review your Action Plan
often
 Raise Your expectations for
yourself
 Celebrate small changes
References
 Bass, B.M. (1985). Leadership and performance
beyond expectations. New York: Free Press.
 Bass, B.M. (1990). Bass and Stogdill’s handbook of
leadership: theory, reasearch and managerial
applications, 3rd ed. New York: Free press.
 Goleman, Daniel. (2000) Leadership that gets
results. Harvard Business Review.
 Goleman, D. (1998). Working with emotional
intelligence. New York: Bantam Books

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