ODOT OAA Pres. 04-22-14 - Ohio Department of Transportation

Report
OHIO AVIATION ASSOCIATION
April 22, 2014
WELCOME AND INTRODUCTIONS
• Dave Dennis – Aviation Planner, ODOT Office of
Aviation; Project Manager for Focus Study; Ohio
Airport Grant Program - Apps due May 1!
• Jim Bryant – Administrator, ODOT Office of Aviation
• Chuck Dyer – Liaison with ODOT Division of
Planning
www.airportsfocusstudy.ohio.gov
Dave Dennis, 614-387-2352
2
PROJECT ADVISORY COMMITTEE
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Aircraft Owners & Pilots Association - AOPA
County Commissioners Association
FAA Detroit Airports District Office – Det. ADO; 90% AIP grant
National Air Transportation Association - NATA
National Business Aviation Association – NBAA
Ohio Regional Business Aviation Association - ORBAA
Ohio Aviation Association - OAA
ODOT Office of Aviation
ODOT Office of Statewide Planning
Ohio Department of Development
Ohio Chamber of Commerce
Ohio Municipal League
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ROLE OF PROJECT ADVISORY COMMITTEE
• Provide advice on policy issues, e.g., adding
instrument approach to the airport classification
criteria
• “Sounding Board” - Assist in the flow of
information to and from aviation stakeholders
• Review study deliverables
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FOCUS STUDY PURPOSE AND GOALS
“The Focus Study will be used to optimize investment in
Ohio’s airport system with an eye toward safety, efficiency
and economic growth.
It will identify needed system improvements, develop a
framework for prioritizing those projects, and assess the
economic impact of each publicly owned airport.
The Study’s findings will assist ODOT and FAA in making
hard decisions on proposed airport development in a period
of limited funding.”
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FOCUS STUDY PROGRESS
2012
2013
2014
SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC
Set the Stage and
Consult
Stakeholders
Analyze Airport System
Data and Determine
System Needs
Issue
Reports
Recommend Potential Actions and Issue Economic
Impact Findings
Collect Airport System Data
Public
Meetings
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PROJECT FACTS
• Inventory
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All 104 system airports were visited
100% response from airport managers
70% response rate from economic development agencies
Data on 500+ general aviation airport tenants
• System Facts – Airports with:
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5,000-foot runways:
Air traffic control towers:
Weather reporting:
Precision approaches (ILS):
Jet fuel:
42
15
62
21
79
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DATA COLLECTION – INVENTORY PHASE
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Airport Management Surveys
Airport Business Surveys
Pilot Surveys
Non-Aviation Business Surveys
Economic Development Agency Surveys
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GENERAL AVIATION ACTIVITY FORECASTS
• Projections
– Based aircraft:
– Annual operations:
2012
4,687
2.7 million
2032
5,182
3.0 million
• Considered Ohio demographic shifts and
national general aviation trends
• Jet Operations
< 300 jet ops:
300 to 700 jet ops:
> 700 jet ops:
28 airports
21 airports
55 airports
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AIRPORT CLASSIFICATION
• Identify how Ohio’s airport system
serves our state today
– Build on national FAA classification
system – NPIAS, Asset Study
– Airports serve different market
segments
– One size does not fit all
– Availability of funding is not a factor in
developing classifications
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AIRPORT CLASSIFICATION
• Air Carrier Airports – Support scheduled airline
operations (7 airports, not the focus of this study)
• General Aviation Airports – Split into two groups,
those that serve turbine (jet and turboprop) aircraft,
and those that serve piston (propeller) aircraft
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AIRPORT CLASSIFICATION
• Level 1 Airports – Serve nearly all the needs of
general aviation turbine powered aircraft and their
users.
• Level 2 Airports – Serve many, but not necessarily
all, the needs of turbine powered aircraft.
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AIRPORT CLASSIFICATION
• Level 3 Airports – Serves piston
powered aircraft predominately,
meeting nearly all their needs.
• Level 4 Airports – Serves piston
powered aircraft, but may not meet
all aircraft needs.
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AIRPORT CLASSIFICATION CRITERIA
Criteria used following extensive PAC input:
• Runway length – under/over 4,000’
• Type of fuel available – sales of 10,000 gallons of jet fuel
• Maintenance services available – turbine, piston, none
• Instrument approach capabilities – precision, nonprecision, circling
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OHIO AIRPORT
CLASSIFICATIONS
7 Air Carrier Airports
33 Level 1 Airports
18 Level 2 Airports
29 Level 3 Airports
17 Level 4 Airports
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AIRPORT CLASSIFICATION USES
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Develop facility and service recommendations
Measure system performance
Identify system’s capital needs
Assess service areas
– Overlaps
– Gaps
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AIRPORT SERVICE AREAS
– ALL SYSTEM AIRPORTS
Ohio’s Airport System
provides convenient airport
services to more than 97%
of the population.
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COMPLIANCE AND STEWARDSHIP
WILL BE CONSIDERED
• Are airports in compliance with select FAA
requirements?
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Pavement maintenance
Through-the-Fence (off-airport access)
Leases – standardized
Land use compatibility
Runway Protection Zone controls
Runway Safety Area compliance
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STEWARDSHIP
Pavement Condition Index*
Very Poor
1%
Good
Poor
6%
Poor
N/A
2%
Good
18%
Satisfactory
46%
Fair
27%
*Based on ODOT
inspection data
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EXAMPLES OF COMPLIANCE ISSUES
• Through-the-Fence (TTF)
– 26 airports have TTF activities
– Considers commercial and residential properties
– Are there airport/TTF agreements in place?
• Obstruction Removal
– On airport
– Off airport: Easements, land acquisition
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UNIQUE ASPECTS OF OHIO’S AIRPORTS
• Aviation Education and Training
– 73 airports with aviation education or training
programs
– World class aviation college and university facilities:
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Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
Kent State University
Ohio University
The Ohio State University
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UNIQUE ASPECTS OF OHIO’S AIRPORTS
• A Leader in the
Fractional Ownership
Industry
– Headquarters of NetJets
(Port Columbus) and
Flight Options (Cuyahoga
Co.)
– 1,400 direct jobs
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GENERAL AVIATION TAX IMPACTS
• Annual Tax Impacts
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General aviation fuel tax revenues: $15.9 million
Aviation services tax revenues: $13.7 million
Total sales tax from aviation: $29.6 million
Data on fuel sales and aviation services was collected
during inventory phase, high level of confidence
– Tax revenues from aviation fuel and services NOT set
aside for aviation purposes
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FOCUS STUDY - NEXT STEPS
• Finalize compliance evaluation
• Complete Geographical Information System
(GIS) analysis of service areas, regional needs
and capacity – gaps and overlaps
• Develop recommendations for system
improvements
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FOCUS STUDY - NEXT STEPS
• Continue working with Project Advisory
Committee
• The draft system recommendations will be
available for public review and input during
the final round of public meetings in the Fall
2014
• Publish final report December, 2014
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Thank You
www.airportsfocusstudy.ohio.gov
Dave Dennis, 614-387-2352
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