PowerPoint - Wisconsin PBIS Network

Report
Culturally
Responsive PBIS
Pre-conference 2014
Wisconsin Dells, WI
Andreal Davis, Kathy Myles, Kent Smith,
Michelle Belnavis, Milaney Leverson
Wisconsin RtI Center
Our vision is that every Wisconsin school has a
culturally responsive multi-level system of support
that ensures fidelity and sustainability for students
to achieve academic and behavioral success.
Our mission is to support Wisconsin schools in the
implementation of culturally responsive multi-level
systems of support for all students.
Materials
• Presentation Power-point, activities and other resources
referenced in session can be found at
• http://tinyurl.com/kgcwbuh
• Or by scanning:
Agenda
• Setting the Stage: What is the purpose behind this work?
• Use of data to identify needs and PD focus
• Culturally Responsive Practices
• Begin to Incorporate CRP into PBIS Framework
• Wrap up and work/planning time
True Colors
Your Personal Style
Part I: Describe Yourself
Below are several rows of word groups. Working one row at a time, rrank each word gn
o up o
i t he bsxe s ui ng a “4” forrhe
t go
ou p ms t like you
o d wn o
t a “1” fhr troe wr d gou p least like you. (Scoreo w rds across.)
• Take a few minutes
to complete the
personal profile.
• (Make sure you
score the
columns and not
the rows)
Active
Opportunistic
Spontaneous
Competitive
Impetuous
Impactful
Realistic
Open-minded
Adventuresome
Daring
Impulsive
Fun
Exciting
Courageous
Skillful
Total
Orange
Parental
Traditional
Responsible
Practical
Sensible
Dependable
Loyal
Conservative
Organized
Concerned
Procedural
Cooperative
Orderly
Conventional
Caring
Total
Gold
Authentic
Harmonious
Compassionate
Unique
Empathetic
Communicative
Devoted
Warm
Poetic
Tender
Inspirational
Dramatic
Vivacious
Affectionate
Sympathetic
Total
Blue
Part II: Your Personal Style Preferences
Brightest color:_____________ _________________
My brightest color is shaded with: ______________________
And with: _______________________
Kahil, C. & Lowry, D. (2005). Follow Your True Colors to the Work You Love. True Colors, Inc. Publishing. Santa Ana, CA.
Versatile
Inventive
Competent
Curious
Conceptual
Knowledgeable
Theoretical
Seeking
Ingenious
Determined
Complex
Composed
Philosophical
Principled
Rational
Total
Green
Whatever you see in a child is what you will produce –
“I don’t become what I think I can; I don’t become what you think I
can; I become what I think YOU THINK I can.”
"Educational researchers have proven
time and again that culturally responsive
teaching methods increase student
engagement. So if our teaching is not
culturally relevant, then we as educators
are not relevant."
- Chike Akua
“Students with disabilities are almost TWICE as likely to be
suspended from school as nondisabled students, with the highest
rates among black children with disabilities.”
NYTimes, M. Rich Aug 7 2012
National Data
• 13% with disabilities are suspended
from school versus 7% of students
without disabilities
• 1 in 4 Black K-12 students are suspended
from school at least once
Students with greater than one suspension
per year:
• 1 in 6 Black students
• 1 in 13 American Indian students
• 1 in 14 Latino students
• 1 in 20 White students
High suspension is correlated with:
• Low achievement
• Dropout
• Juvenile incarceration
Not correlated with the race of staff
writing referrals.
State by state data found at Dignity in
Schools Campaign Fact Sheet:
www.dignityinschools.org
Dan Losen & Jonathan Gillespie
Center for Civil Rights Remedies at UCLA – Presented by George Sugai (8/12)
As a result of these trends and
data…
• Federal guidelines issued January 9, 2014 from the US Dept. of
Education and US Dept. of Justice recommending use of PBIS
and Cultural and Racial Equity to:
• alter school climate,
• reduce use of exclusionary practices and
• decrease discipline disproportionality
• Copies of Federal Guidelines and additional resources at the end
of presentation
Creating a common vision
Why do we
exist?
Who are your
students?
How can we
enhance their
lives through
education?
What will we
collectively
commit to do
to make that
happen?
Mission, vision, beliefs
Cultural, linguistic, environmental
Behavior, achievement, perception data
System implementation of prioritized actions
Adapted from Muhammad, A. (2013, August 7). The Will to Lead: Creating Healthy School Culture. Speech
presented at WI RtI Center training. Madison, WI.
Personal Style
• How do these
tendencies impact
you in your work ?
• In your family?
Color Group Discussion
• Join your color group
• Discuss “What if we had a team of people
who were all (orange/blue/gold/green)?
What would happen? What would go well?
What may not?
• Then discuss “how schools are set up? For
which color group?” Share specific examples.
Unintentional Reinforcement of Trends
• These outcomes continue because our systems are not designed to
meet the needs of or examine outcomes for ALL groups of students.
• Institutions and systems have not changed substantially in the last
100 years.
• These outcomes are reinforced by policy at every level; Federal,
State and Local.
We see the world not as it is, but as we are…
Students and Schools
• Create mixed color
groups
• Using one specific
example from the
previous activity –
differentiate it for all
color groups
Culture Affects How We. . .
•
•
•
•
•
Think
Communicate
Interpret the World
Make Decisions
Solve Problems
Cultural Competence
Examining
the system
Self Awareness
Respectful
curriculum
Responsibility
= Institution
Believing students
will learn
Understanding
world view
Standing up
Knowing the
community
Adapted from X. Liang and G. Zhang and the
State of Washington Department of Public
Instruction
Developing Cultural
Competence
• Can you think of anyone that works with you, a family
member, or friend that you believe is culturally competent?
• Why do you think they are culturally competent?
• Are you culturally competent? Why do you think so? How do
you know?
• What steps have you taken to improve your knowledge and
understanding of your students and colleagues who are
from a different racial/ethnic/cultural group from your own?
Creating a common vision
Why do we
exist?
Who are your
students?
How can we
enhance their
lives through
education?
What will we
collectively
commit to do
to make that
happen?
Mission, vision, beliefs
Cultural, linguistic, environmental
Behavior, achievement, perception data
System implementation of prioritized actions
Adapted from Muhammad, A. (2013, August 7). The Will to Lead: Creating Healthy School Culture. Speech
presented at WI RtI Center training. Madison, WI.
Risk Ratio
relative risk (RR) is the ratio of the probability of an
event occurring (for example, developing a disease,
being injured) in one group to the probability of the
event occurring in a comparison group
Link Risk back to Education….
In Wisconsin, it’s another story
(Retrieved from DPI website, 3/31/14)
80
70
60
50
40
30
% of total enrollement
11-12
% of enrolled group
with suspension 11-12
20
10
0
Risk Ratio compared to white 11-12
12
10
8
6
4
2
0
Risk Ratio compared to white
11-12
An example of Risk Ratio
Risk of Getting a Speeding Ticket
5
4.5
4
3.5
3
2.5
2
1.5
1
0.5
0
Average Driver
Volkswagon gti
Mercedes-Benz CLS-63
Hummer
Calculation
• Automatic calculator available by going to:
http://tinyurl.com/pb3qg74
• Risk Ratio = x ÷ y
x = percent of subgroup with particular outcome
_________________________________________
y = percent of majority subgroup with same outcome
Example Calculations
Over the past 30 days, Office Discipline Referral (ODR) data indicates:
• x = 48% of Black students have received an ODR
• y = 24% of White students have received an ODR
% of enrolled group with ODR
60
50
40
30
% of enrolled group with ODR
20
10
0
Black
White
Example Calculations
Continued…
Risk Ratio = x ÷ y
• x (48%) ÷ y (24%) = 2
Risk
±.25 difference between risk ratios
indicates a need for further action
2.5
2
1.5
Risk
1
0.5
0
Black
White
Risk Ratio Calculator
• Show slides of calculating risk ratio with the calculator
Team Time: Take Action to Address
Needs
• Disaggregate data specific to the subgroup:
1.
2.
3.
4.
What are the behaviors that are most common?
When are the behaviors happening?
Where are the behaviors happening?
Why might they be happening (possible motivation)?
• Action plan around identified areas of need:
• What is the task, Who is responsible, by When will it be completed, etc.
Team Time: Planning
• Once data shows a pattern, teams need to consider:
•
•
•
•
•
•
What knowledge and skills the staff need
How to deliver that (short term)
How to support that (long term)
How to monitor the effects and impact
Where resources will come from
Align to blueprint
Funding
Visibility
Political
Support
Policy
LEADERSHIP TEAM
(Coordination)
Training
Coaching
Evaluation
Local School/District Implementation
Demonstrations
Behavioral
Content
Expertise
Expertise
Norms/Values and their Effects
• Ways to evaluate the effects of norms/values on your system:
• Disaggregate Discipline data
• Disaggregate Suspension data
• Compute Risk Ratio: http://tinyurl.com/pb3qg74
• If negative trends are visible:
• Problem solve at the SYSTEMS level (i.e. not just one classroom/teacher at a time)
• What knowledge and skills the staff need
• How to deliver that (short term)
• How to support that (long term)
• We must change the educational setting to reach all students, NOT
simply expect the student to assimilate
Cultural Relevancy
Gloria Ladson-Billings (UW-Madison) coined the term
“cultural relevancy” in 1994.
It is a way of teaching that “empowers students
intellectually, socially, emotionally, and politically by using
culture to impart knowledge, skills, and attitudes.”
Key components
of Culturally Responsive Practices:
• are culturally competent, know about their students’ cultural beliefs
and practices;
• think of all of their students as capable learners, have high expectations
for them, and help the students set short and long term goals for
themselves;
• know each student and draw on the students’ own experiences to help
them learn;
• have a wide variety of teaching strategies and skills to engage the
students;
• can help the students deal with the inequitable treatment of students of
color and other underserved populations by helping them become
critically conscious and knowledgeable about the students' culture; and
• can create a bridge between the students’ home and school lives while
meeting district and state curricular requirements.
Concept 1
• Teachers who can create a bridge
between the students’ home and
school lives while meeting district and
state curricular requirements.
Where can I…
•Validate
•Affirm
•Build
•Bridge
Validate – Affirm – Build – Bridge
Keeping Relationships at the Center
Validating and Affirming
This involves building and nurturing
relationships, established through
honest self-reflection and having
an open mind about what factors
might be contributing to a
student’s success and struggles in
the classroom.
Concept 2
• Teachers who are culturally competent know
about their students’ cultural beliefs
and practices.
Establishing Relationships
• Know the students’ family, interests and culture.
• Plan for culturally responsive teacher/student/parent
opportunities for strengthening relationships
• Welcome students by name as they enter the classroom.
• Learn, use and display some words in students’ heritage
languages.
• Acknowledge all students’ comments, responses, questions
and contributions by affirming, validating, probing.
• Use students’ real life experiences to connect school learning
to students’ lives.
Read Your Heart Out – Family
Engagement
• Video clip
https://mediaprodweb.madison.k12.wi.us/node/579-hawthorne
Concept 3
• Teachers who think of all of their students as
capable learners, have high expectations for
them, and help the students set short and
long term goals for themselves
Identity
Development
• Does your body language, gestures and
expressions convey a message that all students’
questions and opinions are important?
• Do your VISUALS (bulletin boards, instructional materials etc.):
• reflect the racial, ethnic and cultural backgrounds of
ALL students?
• Do you create class team-building opportunities that
promote peer support for academic achievement?
STRATEGIES TO BUILD A CULTURALLY
RESPONSIVE SYSTEM OF PBIS
Shawno Exemplar
BEHAVIOR VIOLATION SYSTEMS
Behavior Violations
• Systems must have:
• Clear definitions of Major versus Minor behavior
• Components to ensure staff understanding of behavior
violations
• Initial teaching of the system
• Staff fluency checks
• Frequent data reviews
• Ongoing professional development for all staff
based on data
• When those components are in place, teams must
determine whether behaviors are wrong or culturally
inappropriate
Addressing Culturally
“Inappropriate” Behaviors
• Scenario: Student comes from a strong tradition
of “overlap,” which is seen as interruption in the
classroom.
• Allow for overlap in discussion; teach class to
overlap during discussion (code-switch)
• Teach student not to overlap during instruction
(code-switch)
• Systems need to move away from punishing
students who bring cultural diversity to our
schools.
Team Time
• Look at your T chart of behaviors as it exists.
• Thinking about the Norms Matrix Andreal and
Michelle walked you through:
• What of those behaviors are points of concern for
your team either because of:
• Subjectivity, lack of staff fluency, or cultural
misunderstanding
• Action plan system needs: who needs to do what
with whom by when?
Teachers who can create a bridge between the students’
home and school lives while meeting district and state
curricular requirements.
FAMILY ENGAGEMENT
Family Engagement
• Keep in mind:
• Representation of community cultures
• Representation of diverse family values and systems
• Family representatives and family engagement
opportunities can:
• Ease in validating, affirming, building relationships
• Enhance sense of belonging and communication
Epstein’s 6 Types of Parent Engagement
1. Parenting: Helping homes support children as
students
2. Communicating: Designed to facilitate
communication about programs and progress
3. Volunteering: Parents as helpers and supports
4. Learning at home: How to help students with
homework & other curriculum related activities, etc.
5. Decision making: Involving families in school
decisions
6. Collaboration with community: Strengthen
home/school/community
SCHOOL-WIDE EXPECTATIONS
School-wide Behavior Expectations
Respectful
Responsible
Safe
Classroom Procedures/Routines
EXPECTATIONS
Be
Class-Wide
Arrival
Cooperative
Learning
Groups
Independent
Seat Work
Whole Group
Identify Attention Signal…….Teach, Practice, Reinforce
• Listen to others
• Follow
• Eyes/ears on
•Use kind words • Enter/exit
classroom
• Accept
directions
speaker (is this
& actions
Respectful •Follow adult
prepared
differences
distancing?)
• Use inside voice • Use kind words
• Create for
• Raise hand to
directions
so others may
• Encourage
yourself and be speak (is this
learn
Be
Responsible
Others
• Wait your turn to
speak (this may
disengage some
students unless
capital taught)
•Take proper care • Place materials • Use Time Wisely
in correct area
• Contribute
of all personal
• (practice ORDER) • Complete your
belongings &
• Begin warm-up
part
school
promptly
equipment
Be Safe
•Keep hands, feet • Walk
& objects to self
•Use all
equipment &
materials
appropriately
• Use Materials
Carefully
• Respect
community
resources
proud
• Be honest in
your work
distancing?
Options?)
• Contribute to
learning
• Be a TASK
master
• Use your
neighbor/com
munity
• Follow
directions
• Take notes
• Meet your
goals
• Keep hands,
feet, and
objects to self
• Stay at seat
• Keep hands,
feet, and
objects to self
Personal Matrix
• Teach behavior expectations
• Have students define what those expectations would look like:
• At school
• At home
• In the community
• For example: what does it look like to be Responsible when someone
is bothering you?
• At school: Tell an adult
• At home: Walk away (telling an adult annoys your parents)
• In your neighborhood: Stand up for yourself (or get your
butt kicked)
Team Time
• Thinking about family engagement and your school
wide/classroom expectations:
• How have you engaged families in your universal
system to get their “voice” and to help VABB?
• How have you linked your universal expectations
to students’ experiences from home and
community to VABB when there is a difference?
• Action plan: Who needs to do what with whom by
when?
ACKNOWLEDGMENT & ENVIRONMENT
Do your VISUALS (bulletin boards, instructional materials, etc.):
•
reflect the racial, ethnic and cultural backgrounds of ALL students?
Establish a Positive Environment
• 5:1 acknowledgement to correction rate will help build behavior
fluency
• Begin each class period with a celebration or affirmation
(Harambee time – “come together”)
• Chant, song, celebration
• Builds community, belonging and group identity
• Your first comment to a child establishes behavioral momentum
• “Interspersed requests”
• Behavioral priming
• Provide multiple paths to success/praise.
• Group contingencies, personal contingencies, etc.
Teaching & Using Acknowledgement
Acknowledgement:
• Is an important part of how behaviors are taught
• Builds behavioral fluency faster
• Helps teach cultural capital (code switching) when
cultural differences exist
• Develops positive connections between student and
school
Positive Environment
Think about whose experience is on display:
• Can all students SEE themselves and their experiences on display
DAILY?
• What reading material is available and who is shown in it?
• What music is used? What art is shown? What history is taught?
Review range of instructional and work options:
• How are students expected to complete work (in a small group,
individually, etc.)?
• What type of instruction is provided (lecture, call and respond,
movement based)?
Team Time
• Considering the last points, audit your school
wide and known classrooms for these points:
• Can ALL students see/experience their culture
in these settings DAILY?
• Are all student cultures part of the daily
experience in the setting and material?
• Action plan: If student experiences are missing,
how will you address this? What do staff need
to be taught, what is your plan?
Conclusion
• Reducing disparate impact is the responsibility of
the SYSTEM that the school is based on.
• To be successful, the SYSTEM has to evaluate its
progress and address needs on a regular basis.
• Family and community resources can be used to
help provide necessary professional
development.
Conclusion
• System change needs to occur at the staff level
daily in the classroom.
• BUT it also must be driven from the
administrative level in terms of system mission.
• “Culture eats structure for breakfast.”
• If the system does not change, the individual
efforts will have limited impact.
Wrap up
• Objectives for this session included:
• Define CRP and how it fits with PBIS
• Offer practical short term ideas to start the
conversation with staff
• Guide how to start long term professional
development (resource section)
Remaining Time
• Remaining time is yours to finish action planning
how you will take and use this information to
change your systems.
• Long term – What is your larger vision of what
you want to be different in your building and
how will you get there via short term goals.
• Short term – what are things you can do in the
next year that will have some impact and lead to
larger changes.
Contact info:
Andreal Davis – Culturally Responsive Practices
Coordinator
[email protected]
Kathy Myles – Coaching and Leadership TAC
[email protected]
Kent Smith – PBIS TAC
[email protected]
Michelle Belnavis – Culturally Responsive Practices TAC
[email protected]
Milaney Leverson – PBIS TAC
[email protected]

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