Bell Work

Report
Bell Work
• Can you answer this riddle?
Write your best guess in
your notebook.
A young lady looked at a
picture and said “this
person’s mother was my
mothers mother-in-law.”
Who is in the picture?
Consider…
• Are people good or bad by nature?
• You must choose one: good or bad
• Have 1 example to support your reasoning
• Prepare to share 
Other opinions…
• Thomas Hobbes
• John Locke
• Magna Carta
• Iroquois Confederacy
Hobbes thinks we’re
Horrible
• Thomas Hobbes
• State of Nature: People left by
themselves will destroy each
other.
• Best form of Government:
Absolute Monarchy
• Divine Right: Monarch is given
power by God
State of Nature: how
people will act with no
government to tell them
what to do
Locke thinks we’re
Lovely
• John Locke
• State of Nature: People will
support each other.
• Natural Rights: Pursue Life,
Liberty and Property
• Best form of Government: Social
Contract
• People agree to give up a little
freedom to have their rights
protected
• Government is given power by
the people
Magna Carta
• King John
• Rebel Barons
• 2 key phrases:
• "No freeman shall be taken, imprisoned,
deceased, outlawed, banished, or in any way
destroyed, nor will We proceed against or
prosecute him, except by the lawful
judgment of his peers and by the law of the
land.”
• "To no one will We sell, to no one will We
deny or delay, right or justice."
Iroquois Confederacy
Bell Work
Please answer the following questions about the
Iroquois confederacy
1. Why was it created?
2. What did it do?
3. What did we take from it, what didn’t we use?
Consider…
• What were 3 complaints colonists had about
King George the turd… I mean the 3rd?
Declaration of
Independence
• Listed Colonists’ problems with the King of
England
• Examples?
1. Taxation without
representation
2. Not allowing a trial by jury
3. Putting soldiers in colonists’
homes
1. Blocking colony growth
st
1
Rulebook…
• The Articles of Confederation
Now…
• Please take out your “Articles of Confederation” reading
• Find 3 other students who read different sections of the
Articles
•
•
•
•
#1 read – state independence, relationship between the states
#2 read – representation in congress, preparing for war
#3 read – Powers of congress
#4 read – Canada, debts of congress, pledge and conclusion
• Share the powers you found for State and Congress
• You should have 12 STATE powers
• 9 CONGRESSIONAL
Prepare to share your answers with the whole class
Bell Work
• Please show Mrs. V your T chart of State and
Congressional powers so she can give you
points.
The Articles of
Confederation
Powers of the States
Powers of Congress
Bell Work:
Please copy the powers given to States and Congress under
the Articles of Confederation into your “T” chart.
Powers of the States
1. Sovereignty over their own affairs
2. Any power not given to Congress is given to
them
3. Print money
4. They can defend themselves and each other
against attack without permission from
Congress
5. Their decisions will be respected by other
states (Courts)
6. Decide how their government representatives
are chosen
7. Each state has 1 vote in congress no matter
their size
8. Choose their own militia officers
9. Decide how they want to collect money from
citizens
10. 9 out of 13 states must agree before Congress
can make any decisions about money
11. States can decide if Canada or other colonies
can enter the union
12. All states must agree to any changes to the
Powers of Congress
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Make peace and War
Receive and send ambassadors
Decide value of coins/print money
Make decisions on trade and Indians but
can’t infringe on a state’s right in that
area
Can choose officers of army but can’t
keep a standing army
Appoint a president for a 1 yr term
Make decision about money with the
permission of 9/13 states but can’t force
states to pay a tax
Will pay the debts
Must approve of changes to the Articles
Question to Consider
1. What was the mindset of the states when
they created the Articles of Confederation?
The Articles of
Confederation
Strengths
?
Weaknesses
1. Congress could ask for money but had no
power to make the states pay – they
often didn’t
2. 1 vote per state no matter the size
3. No standing army to respond to threats
4. Each state had their own court no central
court system.
5. Changes to the articles required 100%
agreement
6. Congress had no power to make financial
decisions on their own
7. No real way for Congress to regulate
trade or make the states follow their
decisions
8. No central leader
9. No veto
The Central Government is too weak, the
states too strong.
Shay’s Rebellion
• Massachusetts had high state debt
• increased taxes and demanded debt repayment from
citizens
• Poor economy = farmers couldn’t sell their products
• Their request for help was ignored
• Led 1,000+ men to overtake the Massachusetts arsenal
• Lasted several months
Changing the Articles
• In your groups:
• Choose 1 weakness of the Articles
• Propose a change to eliminate this weakness
• Then answer the following
• Does this revision create a new set of problems?
• What would a natural rights philosopher (Locke)
think of this provision?
• How would this provision be evaluated under
the social contract theory of government?
Consider
1. List the objects and
people you see in
the cartoon
2. Identify any
symbols you may
see
3. Explain the
message of the
cartoon
4. Do you think this is
an accurate picture
of the
Constitutional
NO Bell Work 
• Agenda
• Finish Constitutional Convention Activity
• Call Mrs. V over when your group has
completed the sheet.
• REMEMBER: Parent Signature due TODAY.
Constitutional Convention
1787
The Delegates
• 55 men from 12
states
• 35 were lawyers
• 12 owned slave
plantations
• 2 were the
wealthiest men in
the country
• It took 3.5 MONTHS
6 Big Questions
1.
Do we keep the Articles or create
something new?
2. If we have a single leader, how do we
keep them from having too much power?
3. How do we divide power between
national government and the states?
4. How do we divide power between the
states?
5. Who will make the laws?
6. Who will vote?
What THEY did
A. Threw out the Articles wrote Constitution
A. Strong central government BUT…
• Federalism = shared power with the sates
through Enumerated, Concurrent, and
Reserved Powers
• 3 Branches with Checks and Balances
B. President
• Commander in Chief BUT army can only be
standing for 2 years
• Checks from other 2 branches
C. Congress
• Connecticut (Great) Compromise
• Bicameral Legislature = 2 parts (House
and Senate)
D. Women, children, and slaves count but can’t vote
• 3/5 Compromise
E.
Men with property can vote
• Electoral college chooses president
• Popular elections for state leaders and
House of representatives
• State leaders appoint Senators
Answering
the 6 Big
Questions
Consider….
• Choose one of these conflicts from our activity
today:
a) A single leader that won’t become a king.
b) Representation for large and small states.
c) Sharing power between national and state
governments.
d) How women, slaves, and children fit into the new
government.
• Then in 1 paragraph:
• Describe the conflict.
• Describe how the delegates to the Convention
resolved this conflict through compromise.
Bell Work
Please copy the following vocab words and their
definitions into your notes.
• Delegated Powers (aka Enumerated): The powers of National
Government specifically written down in the
Constitution in Articles I, II, and III.
•
Example: The power to declare war
• Concurrent Powers: Powers held by both the states
and the national government.
•
Example: The power to make laws
• Reserved Powers: Powers held only by the states.
•
Example: State Sales Tax
What THEY did
A. Threw out the Articles wrote Constitution
A. Strong central government BUT…
• Federalism = shared power with the sates
through Enumerated, Concurrent, and
Reserved Powers
• 3 Branches with Checks and Balances
B. President
• Commander in Chief BUT army can only be
standing for 2 years
• Checks from other 2 branches
C. Congress
• Connecticut (Great) Compromise
• Bicameral Legislature = 2 parts (House
and Senate)
D. Women, children, and slaves count but can’t vote
• 3/5 Compromise
E.
Men with property can vote
• Electoral college chooses president
• Popular elections for state leaders and
House of representatives
• State leaders appoint Senators
Please
finish
copying
these
down into
your
notes.
Checks and Balances
• Take out your copy of the Constitution
• Highlight the Titles of Articles I, II, and III
• Note that they contain the rules that create our
system of checks and balances
Today’s Agenda
• Head to the computer lab
• Go to:
http://www.brainpop.com/socialstudies/usgovernmentandlaw/br
anchesofgovernment/
1.
Watch the video
•
2.
Complete the Graphic Organizer
•
3.
Answer 1-18 on the worksheet
#19 on worksheet
Complete the Map
*Hand in when finished – must be completed by Wednesday.*
Constitutional
Convention
How can we meet our need for a strong leader but
not have a dictator?
A question
of
Balance
Bell Work
1.
List the
objects and
people you
see in the
cartoon
2. Identify any
symbols
you may
see
3. Explain the
message of
the cartoon
Elections
2 types
Presidential
Electoral College
(Article II, sect I and 12th Am.)
Popular
If you get the most
votes, you win
(Article I, sect II)
What is an Electoral District?
Definition:
A territorial
division used
to hold
elections.
Only voters
who live in the
district can
vote in that
district.
•AKA constituents
AKA You 
How do they make
Districts?
• Census
• Every 10 years districts change if the
population has changed
Who are your Popularly
Elected Reps?
1. Who is your state assembly representative?
2. Who is your state senate representative?
3. Who are your two Senators?
4. Who is your Congressman?
State Representatives
State Assembly - #26
• Smallest District
• Mike Endsley
State Senate - #9
• 3 Assembly Districts Combined
• Manty + Calumet + Sheboygan = D 9
• Joseph Liebham
National Representatives
Senator
•Ron Johnson
Senator
•Herb Kohl
Congressional District - #6
•Wisconsin has 8 Congr. Districts
•Also for Presidential Elections
•Tom Petri
How Do I Find This Stuff?
• Google It
• “voting districts + WI”
• Google It
• “Who are my representatives + WI”
How do I get in on this
voting action??
•In person
•City Hall
•Online
•www.ci.sheboygan.wi.us/
•www.RocktheVote.com
Register!
Learn!
•Find out what the candidates stand
for.
•How truthful are they being?
•www.politifact.org
•Where do they get their $ from?
•www.opensecrets.org
•Find your polling place
•www.vpa.wi.gov
•If you can’t go on election day
you can ABSENTEE VOTE
•Forget to register? Don’t worry
we’ll let you do that on election
day. (bring ID and proof of
address)
Show up!
Electoral College
Article II, Section I
• Features
• Winner Take All System
• 270 To Win
• There were several times in history where a
candidate won the popular vote but not the
electoral vote.
• 2000 Bush v. Gore
• State Chart
• Map
Lets see how it works…
• Fast forward to November
•
•
•
•
YOU get to choose the next president!
Check out their Party Platform
Choose the candidate that fits you
Record your vote on your secret ballot and then
pass it forward.
Will the electoral college results reflect the
popular vote?????
Party Platforms
Candidate A
Candidate B
• Would raise taxes on the top
1% and cut taxes for the
middle class
• Would cut taxes for the top
1% but leave taxes the same
for the middle class
• Pro Choice
• Pro Life
• Would keep regulations on
business at the same level
they are now
• Would decrease regulations
on business
• Would say that protecting
the environment is more
important than company
profits
• Would say that increasing
company profit is more
important than protecting
the environment
• Wants to add jobs
• Wants to add jobs
• Lifetime politician
• Lifetime politician
Electoral College –
st
1
hr
Popular
Candidate A
Popular
Candidate B
EC
Candidate A
EC
Candidate B
California (55)
42
24
55
0
055
Texas (34)
4
1
34
0
Wisconsin (10)
3
2
10
0
North Dakota (3)
1
0
3
0
Alaska (3)
1
0
3
0
Totals (105)
13
11
57
105
50
055
State and EC Votes
Electoral College –
th
4
hr
Popular
Candidate A
Popular
Candidate B
EC
Candidate A
EC
Candidate B
California (55)
11
6
27
55
0
055
Texas (34)
8
1
34
0
Wisconsin (10)
2
1
10
0
North Dakota (3)
0
2
0
3
Alaska (3)
2
0
3
0
Totals (105)
23
18
611
102
47
358
State and EC Votes
Bell Work
• Please answer the following in 1 paragraph:
• Is the Electoral College a useful way to control the
power of the people and stop them from electing a bad
leader or is it unnecessary? Should we abolish or keep
the electoral college? Why?
• Please hand in your answer to the Bell Work AND YOUR
checks and balances packet
Electoral College –
th
6
hr
Popular
Candidate A
Popular
Candidate B
EC
Candidate A
EC
Candidate B
California (55)
74
36
55
0
055
Texas (34)
4
1
34
0
Wisconsin (10)
3
1
10
0
North Dakota (3)
1
0
3
0
Alaska (3)
1
0
3
0
Totals (105)
16
13
59
105
50
055
State and EC Votes
Changing the
Constitution: 2 Ways
Formal = changing the
words
• Look at Constitution,
Article V
• 2 steps – Propose, Ratify
• Propose An Amendment - 2
Ways
• Congress or the States can
propose.
•
•
Both Houses of Congress
must propose the
amendment with 2/3 vote.
Two-thirds of the State
legislatures must call on
Congress to hold a
Constitutional Convention.
• 2. Ratify
• Regardless of how it is
proposed, it must be ratified
by the States.
•
•
¾ of the State legislatures
must approve of the
amendment
¾ of the states must
approve the amendment at
conventions.
Changing the
Constitution: 2Ways
Formal = changing the
words
• Look at Constitution,
Article V
• 2 steps – Propose, Ratify
Informal = changing
how we think and act
• Supreme Court
Interpretations
• Rulings set precedent
Happy Friday!
Today’s Agenda 
• Correct “Checks and Balances” Worksheet
• Correct Federalism Article Wksht
• Checks on Supreme Court
• Executive
• Appoint/nominate justices
• Legislative
• Impeach
• Approve appointments
Please read the statements below and circle whether
you Agree or Disagree.
I say:
Agree/Disagree
Statement
1.
Corporal punishment should be legal in all
schools as a way to punish students.
Agree/Disagree
2. Corporal Punishment is allowed in most
schools in the US.
Agree/Disagree
3. If I get in trouble at North, I could choose
corporal punishment instead of detention.
Agree/Disagree
4. If a child does something wrong, it is OK for
their parents to use corporal punishment.
Agree/Disagree
5. It should be a power of the local community
to decide if they will allow corporal
punishment in their school.
The article says:
Corporal Punishment
Bell Work: please answer the following using your article and notes
from yesterday. HOLD ON TO IT!
1.
Why is corporal
punishment allowed
in public schools?
2.
This is an example of
what type of change
to the Constitution?
3.
Should an
amendment be
made to the
Constitution
banning corporal
punishment in
schools?
4.
What would need to
happen for this to
occur?
Was there good
medicine for behavioral
problems when you
were a kid?
Consider
1. What
concept
from the
constitution
is cartoon
dealing with?
National Power
• Supremacy Clause – Article VI
• If a local law conflicts with a national law,
national law wins.
• Necessary and Proper Clause – Article I,
section VIII
• Congress can make all laws that are necessary
and proper in order to carry out their
enumerated powers
Articles of
Confederation
1781
Constitution
1788
Civil War 1861-1865
• States and
national gov
share control
• National Government
takes more control
• 14th Amendment 1868 –
reduces state power
Who has the power?
•Citizenship
•The due process clause
•The equal protection clause
• States have full
control
The Early Years
Who has the power?
Post civil war
• Industrialization and
Globalization (1865–1945)
• Industrialization:
• 19th century: laissez-faire
economic policy
• The Great Depression
• Stronger regulatory role in
the early twentieth century.
Who has the power?
Post Great Depression
• Cooperative Federalism (1945–
1969)
• State and national share more and
more
• New Federalism (1969–present)
• National Government is too
powerful
1.
Compare and Contrast
a)
New Federalism
b)
Dual Federalism
c)
Cooperative Federalism
Read the article and answer:
2.
How do categorical grants allow the national government to tell states what to do?
3.
How do block grants return power to the states?
4.
Why is the legal drinking age 21?
5.
Arguments over Federalism are really arguments over_______________.
6.
Choose one of these other Federalism dilemmas:
•
Abortion
•
Marijuana use (medical or recreational)
•
Doctor assisted suicide
•
Gay Marriage
a)
Then Answer:
a)
Which level of government should set the policy for this issue? Why are they the best level to deal
with it?
b)
If it were up to you, what policy would you create for this issue? Why would you handle this issue
in this way?
Bell Work
• Directions: Write an answer to the following in
your notebook and hold on to it:
• Should a voter care about a candidate’s race,
religion, income or level of education when
deciding who to vote for?
• Why or why not?
Directions
• You will be assigned either argument A or
argument B
• Read through the argument assigned to you
and fill in your chart accordingly
A battle over principles
Federalists
• Alexander Hamilton, James
Madison, John Jay – all published
The Federalist Papers
• Property owners, landed rich
merchants in Northern states
• Believed in elitism. Saw
themselves and those of their
class as most fit to govern
• Powerful central government. 2house legislature, with one
house (Senate) being more
removed from the people, whom
they generally distrusted.
Anti Federalists
• Thomas Jefferson, Melancton
Smith
• Small farmers, shopkeepers,
laborers
• Believed in the decency of the
common man and in
participatory democracy. Viewed
elites as corrupt. Sought greater
protection of individual rights
• Wanted stronger state
government at he expense of
the federal. Frequent elections,
smaller districts, more direct
democracy.
Bill of Rights
• The Deal is Done
• Washington suggests
adding a list through
the amendment
process
• Constitution ratified
in 1788
• BOR officially added
to the constitution in
1791
Bell Work
• Make sure you have these written down:
• The First 10 Amendments
The first 10
minutes of class
will be set aside
for you to study
(by yourself or
with a partner)
1st = Freedom of speech, religion, and assembly
2nd= right to keep a weapon
3rd= troops can’t be kept in your home
Feel free to look
th
4 = proper searches and seizures
through this
PowerPoint for
5th= rights of an accused person
info you may have
6th= right to a speedy trial
missed.
7th= right to a trial by jury
8th= No cruel and unusual punishment
9th= the constitution should not be used to take rights away from the
people (just because a right isn’t listed does NOT mean it doesn’t exist)
• 10th= any powers not given to the national government are given to the
states
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Did the Anti-Federalist
vision come true?
• Is our government representation matched up
with the country as a whole?
Income
Congress
US
4.78
47
53
AGI Above
One Million
AGI Above
One Million
AGI Below
One Million
AGI Below
One Million
95.22
How Do They Stack Up?
Female
Married
US
Senate
Christian
House
Age 50-59
0
20
40
60
80
100
How Do They Stack Up?
Caucasian
Asian
US
Senate
Hispanic
House
African American
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
Homework
• Study Up!
Constitutional
Convention
How can we meet our need for a strong central government
but make sure the states still have power?
A question
of
Federalism
What is an
example of
a State and
a National
Power?

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