Welcome to “12 Strategies!” SELF STARTER:

Report
Welcome to “12
Strategies!”
SELF STARTER:
Select one:
Write down the one behavior strategy that
you wish everyone knew.
Public Education:
We Teach Them ALL
Students who have…
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Disabilities
Extraordinary Gifts
Ethnic Differences
Home Language Other Than English
Economically Disadvantages
Medical Issues
Public Education:
We Teach Them ALL
Students who are…
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Highly distractible and highly verbal
Conflicted with issues at home
Mobile, attending a number of schools
Focused on peers and social relationships
Non-readers
Tired from part time jobs, late parties
“I think I’ll take the day off!”
“Looks like we lost another
good teacher!”
 “Looks like we lost another
good teacher!”
What it takes to control your
class:
“Good classroom managers
are teachers who understand
and use specific techniques.”
--Robert Marzano, 2003
What it takes to control your
class:
“Good classroom managers are
teachers who understand and use
specific techniques.”
ENGAGEMENT:
23 percentile points higher
--Robert Marzano, 2003
What it takes to control your
class:
“Good classroom managers are
teachers who understand and use
specific techniques.”
ENGAGEMENT:
23 percentile points higher
ACHIEVEMENT:
20 percentile points higher
--Robert Marzano, 2003
“Sure
teaching is
both an art
and a
science…bu
t it’s also
guerrilla
warfare.”
So, what’s with these
12 strategies?
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Focused on new teachers
Not new, just compiled
Not every teacher needs every strategy
Helpful for mentors, principals
Acknowledgements…
5 Assumptions
1. Prevention is more effective than
intervention.
5 Assumptions
1. Prevention is better than intervention.
2. Good relationships are your
most effective tool.
5 Assumptions
1. Prevention is better than intervention.
2. Good relationships are your best tool.
3. There is no substitute for good
instruction.
5 Assumptions
1.
2.
3.
4.
Prevention is better than intervention.
Good relationships are your best tool.
No substitute for good teaching.
Effective strategies are those
that preserve dignity.
5 Assumptions
1. Prevention is better than intervention.
2. Relationships are your best tool.
3. No substitute for good teaching.
4. Effective strategies preserve dignity.
5. Acting the professional works.
“I’m home
a little
early, dear.
The kids
torched the
school.”
6 Strategies to Prevent
Behavior Problems
STRATEGY 1: Social Cues
STRATEGY 1: Social Cues
A simple statement that a teacher
makes to a class that…
…restates a desired behavior,
…attributes it to a specific student,
…loud enough to ‘cue’ the entire class,
…targeted to an area of teacher concern,
…indicates that this behavior helps you.
STRATEGY 1: Social Cues
“What should their behavior look
like or sound like?”
--Dr. Ellen Williams (1996)
STRATEGY 1: Social Cues
CAVEATS:
…Don’t over use them, 2 or 3 should be
enough.
…Adjust to the age of your students.
…Never use sarcasm!
…Be sincere.
STRATEGY 1: Social Cues
THINK TIME:
What is the difference
between a social cue and
a positive comment?
STRATEGY 2: Attention Signal
STRATEGY 2: Attention Signal
A signal saying you are ready to
begin, so their attention is required.
STRATEGY 2: Attention Signal
1. Give a warning.
2. Take your mark.
3. Use your signal.
4. Make eye contact.
5. Use 2 or 3 social cues.
6. Begin immediately.
STRATEGY 3:
Use Self Starters
STRATEGY 3:
Use Self Starters
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Behavior in my classroom is NOT an
extension of behavior in the halls.
I need 5-10 minutes to take roll, sign
notes, and open my lesson plan.
I need your full attention when I am ready
to begin today’s lesson.
Take time to get yourself organized and
settled down to begin today’s work.
STRATEGY 3:
Use Self Starters
1. Directions & materials
STRATEGY 3:
Use Self Starters
1. Directions & materials
2. 5 to 10 minutes
STRATEGY 3:
Use Self Starters
1. Directions & materials
2. 5 to 10 minutes
3. Most students already fluent
STRATEGY 3:
Use Self Starters
1. Directions & materials
2. 5 to 10 minutes
3. Most students already fluent
4. Work must be turned in
STRATEGY 3:
Use Self Starters
EXAMPLES:

One paragraph: should colleges spend
millions of education dollars on football?

Calculate the average of…
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Pick a tool that can slice off a finger, then
write 5 safety rules for its use.
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Should a mosque be built next to 9/11’s
“ground zero” in New York? Why?
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List as many adjectives as you can.
STRATEGY 4:
Proximity Control
STRATEGY 4:
Proximity Control
Reflection Question:
In your classroom who is giving
you the best attention…
the kids in the front rows,
or
the kids in the back?
STRATEGY 4:
Proximity Control
Move frequently throughout your
classroom to constantly create new
“front rows” of student attention.
STRATEGY 4:
Proximity Control
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Stay on the move during…
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Seatwork
Lectures
Demonstrations
Group work
Overhead presentations
Don’t sit at your desk when students are
present.
STRATEGY 5:
Use Time Limits
STRATEGY 5:
Use Time Limits
Reflection Question:
Do your students think they have
plenty of time to just kick back?
STRATEGY 5:
Use Time Limits
Time as a Teacher’s Ally:
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Improves our efficiency
Motivate students
Keep activities fresh, our pacing crisp
Help them learn to manage their time
Anchor students in the moment
Communicates that you are organized
STRATEGY 5:
Making Time YOUR Ally
1. Sub-divide block periods
2. Post today’s schedule
3. Give a clear time limit for each task
4. Give 1-2 minute warnings
5. Use a timer or a watch
6. Make use of “wait time”
STRATEGY 6:
Manage Your Transitions
STRATEGY 6:
Manage Your Transitions
What bugs you about your
transitions?
STRATEGY 6:
Manage Your Transitions
STRATEGY 6:
Manage Your Transitions
1. Be prepared!
2. Use your attention signal.
3. Explain your expectations.
4. Opportunity to ask questions.
5. Signal to begin, use social cues.
6. 5-second warning
7. Use your attention signal.
STRATEGY 6:
More Transition Tips
1. “Ticket”: write down 1st & 2nd things you
2.
3.
4.
5.
will do when you enter the shop.
“Sell” the next activity.
Prepare an attention grabber.
Try to simplify by numbering the next
steps students are to take.
Give a warning that a transition is about
to occur
3 Strategies to Develop
Positive Relationships
STRATEGY 7:
Show You Care
STRATEGY 7:
Show You Care
1. Smile often
2. Use names
3. Share a laugh
4. Notice your students
5. Greet your students at the door
STRATEGY 7:
Show You Care
1. Smile often
2. Use names
3. Share a laugh
4. Notice your students
5. Greet your students at the door
CAUTION: Be the teacher, not the peer.
STRATEGY 8:
Build Trust
STRATEGY 8:
Build Trust
1. If you say it, mean it.
STRATEGY 8:
Build Trust
1. If you say it, mean it.
2. Be consistent.
STRATEGY 8:
Build Trust
1. If you say it, mean it.
2. Be consistent.
3. Be the professional.
STRATEGY 9:
Show Respect
STRATEGY 9:
Show Respect
The only thing we can
really control…
… is ourselves!
STRATEGY 9:
Show Respect
1. Address students by name
2. Use ‘Please’ and ‘Thank you’
3. Use a calm, warm speaking voice
4. Smile
5. Avoid sarcasm
6. Be on time and be ready
7. Assume benevolence
8. Preserve student dignity
STRATEGY 9:
Show Respect
“We must be the change we
wish to see in the world.”
--Mahatma Ghandhi
Strategies to Intervene when
Behavior Problems Arise
Strategies to Intervene when
Behavior Problems Arise
Teachers who use effective
interventions decrease classroom
disruptions by
32 percentile points!
--Robert Marzano, 2003
STRATEGY 10:
The Clipboard Technique
STRATEGY 10:
The Clipboard Technique
Do your students believe
they will be held accountable
for their behavior?
STRATEGY 10:
The Clipboard Technique
 Carry the class roster with you on a
clipboard.
 Show you notice.
 Use the data.
 Notice the positive, use incentives.
STRATEGY 10:
The Clipboard Technique
Check the Chart before:
 “I need someone to go to the
computer to look up…”
 “OK, as I call your name you can
move into the shop to get
started.”
 [Intercom:]
“Please send someone to pick
STRATEGY 10:
The Clipboard Technique
Check the Chart before:
 “The following students can now
go to the library…”
 “Mark, instead of this one, could
you help Juan with his
assignment?”
 “I need someone to help me set
up…”
STRATEGY 10:
The Clipboard Technique
Adaptation: during the self starter…
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walk about the room (proximity)
take roll roll on the clipboard,
mark late-comers as they enter,
mark homework completion
deal with individual issues.
Strategies to Improve the
Quality of our Instruction
Could there be a relationship between
the
 quality of classroom instruction, and
 the quality of student behavior?
Strategies to Improve the
Quality of our Instruction
As a student, think of a time when
YOU caused problems for your
teacher. Write down what caused
you to do this.
STRATEGY 11:
Keep Your Pacing Crisp and
Your Students Active
STRATEGY 11:
Keep Your Pacing Crisp
Attention span is about half the
student’s age.
(Fortin 2008)
STRATEGY 11:
Keep Your Pacing Crisp
Attention span is about half the student’s age.
(Fortin 2008)
35 years ago average a 13-year-old’s
attention span was 15 min. Today
average adult attention span is only
20 min.
(Reynolds 2008)
STRATEGY 11:
Keep Your Pacing Crisp
Attention span is about half the student’s age.
(Fortin 2008)
35 years ago average 13-year-old attention span
was 15 min. Today average adult attention
span is only 20 min. (Reynolds 2008)
In England the attention span of adults
has fallen from 12 min. to 5 min over
the past 10 years. (Lloyd’s 2008)
STRATEGY 11:
Keep Your Pacing Crisp
Why has the attention span of our
students become so short?
STRATEGY 11:
Keep Your Pacing Crisp
 Pick up the pace.
 Move beyond the rote.
 Break up the boredom with change-
ups.
 Use ‘Sponge Activities.’
Strategies to Improve the
Professionalism of our
Practice
“That’s the second time this week that
Ms. Dickey has left her class early to
Strategies to Improve the
Professionalism of our
Practice
Write down the one behavior strategy
that you wish everyone knew.
STRATEGY 12:
Keep Up
STRATEGY 12:
Keep Up
“Withitness”
Jacob Kounin (1970)
STRATEGY 12:
Keep Up
What can teachers do to have
‘eyes in the back of your head?’
STRATEGY 12:
Keep Up
 Scan the class frequently.
 Buffer the interruptions.
 Avoid procedures that encourage
distractions.
 Intervene in a timely, accurate
fashion.

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