Equity Skills Lamar - CEHD Directory

Report
Equity Skills
Dr. Kathryn McKenzie
Texas A&M University
Outcomes
• At the end of this session you should
– Understand the traps that keep us from being
equitable with all students
– Understand the skills that can free us from
these traps
– Have strategies to:
•
•
•
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Assess teacher equity consciousness
Assess teaching skills
Determine active cognitive engagement
Determine the “zone of self-efficacy”
– Know how to conduct “teaching and learning
tours”
Obstacles to Success
• Individually, on post it notes, write down 4 or more
obstacles you believe your teachers would say prevent them
from being successful with ALL students. IMPORTANT!!! Put
one obstacle per post it note.
Obstacles to Success
• As a group, allowing each person to share one obstacle
before moving on, share your obstacles and then categorize
them. Write the categories on chart tablets with marker and
place the post its that exemplify that category below it.
• Choose a spokesperson.
Equity Traps and Equity Skills
Rationale
Equity
Consciousness
Federal Mandate
District Goal
Traps
Skills
Seeing only
Deficits
Seeing Assets
in
ALL students
Norming
The
Negative
Erasing Race
and Culture
Rationalizing
bad behavior
and
unsuccessful
practices
Goal
Creating
Transparency
Strategies
Seeing &
Respecting
Race and Culture
Reflecting on
behavior and
practices
Achievement
Equity
The Goal
Equitable and
Excellent
Schools
Teacher Quality
Skrla, McKenzie,
Scheurich
(2008,2009)
Programmatic
Equity
Achievement
Equity
Focus of Our Work
Teacher Quality
Equity Consciousness + High Quality Teaching Skills
• Equity Consciousness
• High-Quality Teaching Skills
• Two things to look for in assessing equity
consciousness and high quality teaching: Active,
Cognitive Engagement (ACE) and Zone of SelfEfficacy
Successful Teachers
Have
Equity Consciousness
High Quality
Teaching
Skills
Teacher in a Traditional School
Skill
Teacher
Skill
Skill
Teacher in a Culturally Responsive High
Achieving School
Skill
Skill
Skill
Teacher
Skill
Skill
Skill
Skill
Equity Consciousness
Tenets of Equity Consciousness
Tenet One
A belief that all children (except only a small percentage
with profound disabilities) are capable of high levels of
academic success
Tenets of Equity Consciousness
Tenet Two
A belief that academic success is possible regardless of
students’ race, class, gender, culture, or religion
(McKenzie, Skrla, Scheurich, 2006)
Tenets of Equity Consciousness
Tenet Three
A belief that the adults in schools are primarily
responsible for seeing that all children reach success
(McKenzie, Skrla, Scheurich, 2006)
Tenets of Equity Consciousness
Tenet Four
An understanding that traditional school practices have
resulted in inequity for individuals and groups of students
and that these practices must change to ensure the
success of all students
(McKenzie, Skrla, Scheurich, 2006)
Strategies
One strategy for moving out of Equity Traps to Equity Skills is
through awareness brought about through self-reflection,
which then leads to changing practices. A change in
practice often brings about a change in attitude.
The zone of self-efficacy is a strategy that helps educators
change practices and then attitudes.
• As a principal I never talked anyone into changing attitudes
about students.
• I did change practices through strategies like the “zone of
self-efficacy” that brought about a level of awareness that
resulted in a change in practice.
Self-Reflection
Awareness
Change in Practice
Change in Attitudes
Activity
• Write down the characteristics of a student you think
teachers would find easy to teach
• “I love to teach students who…”
Note: When working with teachers we have them write down
the names of the students in their classes they love to teach
• Write down the characteristics of the student that you think
teachers would find difficult to teach
• “It is hard to teach students who…”
Note: For teachers we have them write down the names of the
students in their classes they find difficult or hard to teach.
• Draw a large circle on a piece of paper.
• Inside the circle write the characteristics of students who
are easy to teach.
• Outside the circle write the characteristics of students that
are hard to teach.
Note: For teachers we have them look at the students who are
both easy and hard to teach and look for common
characteristics, including gender, race, learning style, etc.
Efficacy
• capacity or power to produce a desired effect
Self Efficacy
• Belief one has that she has the capacity or power to produce
a desired effect
Classroom Zone of Self-Efficacy
Zone of Self-Efficacy
School Zone of Self Efficacy
v
c
District Zone of Self Efficacy
c
c
High Quality Teaching Skills
High Quality Teaching Skills
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Putting in place consistent and reliable classroom procedures and routines
Clearly communicating classroom expectations for learning
Challenging students with high-level and complex tasks, a rigorous
curriculum
Engaging all students, all the time, in learning activities that are active
instead of passive
Extending student learning through teacher-to-student and student-tostudent discussions
Frequently assessing individual student learning
Differentiating instruction to meet individual student needs and capitalize
on individual assets
Embedding cultural connections in instructions
Demonstrating respect and care in all interactions with all students and
their families
(McKenzie, Skrla, Scheurich, 2006)
Active Cognitive Engagement -ACE
• Active Cognitive Engagement
• Define together
Teaching and Learning Tour
• What is it?
– A professional development strategy
– A strategy focused on
• continual improvement
• reflective practice
• collaboration
Teaching and Learning Tours
•
Focus: Active Cognitive Engagement; Zone of Self-Efficacy
•
Reminder: This is NOT about the person being observed. It IS about using your colleague’s
classroom as a lab for you to engage in reflective practice—that is thinking about your practice.
•
If this was your classroom, what would you be proud of? What is positive in this classroom?
•
What is the objective being taught?
•
Based on this objective, what is the percentage of children who are actively cognitively engaged?
•
Are there any students out of the zone? If so, why do you think this is the case?
•
•
If this was your classroom, what could you do to “ratchet up” the active cognitive engagement or
ensure that all students are in the “zone”?
___________________________________________________________________________________
•
•
Your observer will give you feedback on the strategies you want to try in classroom.
Which strategy or strategies do you want feedback on?
•
Teacher name:___________________________________________
Copyrighted: Do not copy or distribute without written permission from the authors.
Skrla, McKenzie, & Scheurich (2009)
Let’s take a Tour
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kfliX02MlZY
Example of Strategies to Increase Active
Cognitive Engagement
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Teacher guided small groups instead of teacher moving from individual student to individual student
Use of white boards for student responses
Use of timer to move students through transitions and guide individual, small group, and whole class
responses
Assign cooperative jobs for small groups
Use instruction cards for centers
Utilize co-teachers for guiding groups
Individual student response cards (for example A, B, C, D or yes/no or agree/disagree)
Use butcher paper in corners of room and have students respond on the paper
Use butcher paper on the floor and have students respond on the paper
Use sponge activities when waiting on restroom etc to maximize learning time
Games that require individual response, then small group, then whole class
Wait time
Think, Pair, Share
Flexible grouping by student need
Preteach
Use of timer or watch for teacher to check ACE and Zone
Keep it calm, neat and organized
Use of manipulative and graphic organizers
Handouts available at: see “other docs”
http://directory.cehd.tamu.edu/view.epl?nid=kmckenzie

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