ACE IFT model PPT

Report
Bell ringer

List the 4 primary steps in
designing a comprehensive
exercise program

Place the following step in the program design
process in the proper order
a.
_____ present your client with a list of aerobic
activities
b.
_____ share normative information on each fitness
test with your client
c.
____gain a complete picture of your client’s medical
and health status
d.
____ emphasize the importance of elevating the
body temperature through slow aerobic movements
e.
___review the principle of flexibility
f.
____administer a fitness test
g.
____ identify clients that needs more extensive
medical clearance
Bell ringer

List the 4 primary steps in
designing a comprehensive
exercise program

Medical screening

Physical fitness testing

Exercise mode

Design program

Place the following step in the program design
process in the proper order
a.
___5__ present your client with a list of aerobic
activities
b.
___4__ share normative information on each fitness
test with your client
c.
__1__gain a complete picture of your client’s
medical and health status
d.
___6_ emphasize the importance of elevating the
body temperature through slow aerobic movements
e.
__7_review the principle of flexibility
f.
__3__administer a fitness test
g.
__2__ identify clients that needs more extensive
medical clearance
ACE
Integrated Fitness
Training Model
IFT model

Foundation of ACE IFT model is RAPPORT
 It

develops trust and fosters client’s participation
The greatest impact a personal training can have on a
client’s life is to help that person change his or her habits
and establish a positive relationship with exercise
IFT Model: Client / Trainer relationship



The first time a client and trainer meet, it is important for the trainer to
encourage the client and create an environment where he or she can feel
successful.

Initial assessments can be detrimental to early program success

Trainer needs to modify behavior and establish good attitude about
exercise

Many adults who are inactive now may have been inactive their whole
lives
To be a successful personal trainer you will need to apply 2 strategies:

Fitness related behavior change and exercise adherence

Implement comprehensive exercise programs to help client achieve their
goals
Make exercise fun, they need to make it through the first 2 -4 weeks

Concentrating on fun and exercise adherence first then switch to weight
loss or other goals.
Match the traits of a good exercise consultant
on the left with the descriptions on the right
a.
Sharing a story of your own failure to
lose weight
b.
The opposite of “do as I say, not as I
do”
Genuineness
c.
Seeing things through your client’s eyes
5.
Concreteness
d.
Showing concern and being available
6.
Self disclosure
e.
Conveying a secureness in your self
7.
Potency and self actualization
f.
Appreciating the worth of your client
g.
Solidifying essential ideas and elements
1.
Empathy
2.
Respect
3.
Warmth
4.
Match the traits of a good exercise consultant
on the left with the descriptions on the right
a.
Sharing a story of your own failure to
lose weight
b.
The opposite of “do as I say, not as I
do”
Genuineness (B)
c.
Seeing things through your client’s eyes
5.
Concreteness (G)
d.
Showing concern and being available
6.
Self disclosure (A)
e.
Conveying a secureness in your self
7.
Potency and self actualization (E)
f.
Appreciating the worth of your client
g.
Solidifying essential ideas and elements
1.
Empathy ( C )
2.
Respect (F)
3.
Warmth (D)
4.
ACE IFT model

Includes functional and physiological assessments

A comprehensive system for exercise programming that pulls together the
complicated training parameters

Organizes exercise science research into logical systems

Has 2 principal training components:

Functional movement and resistance training

Cardiorespiratory training
 Both
are broken down into 4 phases that provide trainers with strategies to
determine and implement the most appropriate assessments and programs
 Phase
1: focus is improving health by correcting imbalances to improve
joint stability and mobility, improve aerobic base
 Phase
2: progress clients toward improved fitness, aerobic intervals
 Phase
3: moving into performance area of health – fitness – performance
continuum
 Phase
4: focused on improving performance through training for power,
speed, agility, reactivity and anaerobic power.
2 Training Programs
 Functional
movement and
Resistance Training
 Cardiorespiratory
Training

To effectively utilize the ACE
IFT model trainers must
understand how to:
 Develop and enhance
rapport
 Assess which stage a client
is in for each training
component
 Design exercise programs in
each component
 Integrate component to
provide clients with
comprehensive training
solutions
Functional movement and Resistance Training:
Phase 1 Stability and mobility training

The principal goal of phase 1 is to develop postural stability without
compromising mobility.

The training focus is on the introduction of low-intensity exercise programs to
improve the client’s posture.

Exercise selection focuses on core and balance exercises.

Neutral position, hold COG (center of gravity)

No assessments of muscular strength or endurance are
required prior to designing and implementing an exercise
program during this phase.

Assessments that should be conducted early in this
phase include basic assessments of:

Posture

Balance

Movement

Range of motion of the ankle, hip, shoulder complex,
and thoracic and lumbar spine
Phase 2: Movement Training

The primary focus during phase 2 is training movement patterns.

Movement training focuses on the five primary movements of exercise:

Bend-and-lift movements (e.g., squatting)

Single-leg movements (e.g., lunging)

Pushing movements

Pulling movements

Rotational (spiral) movements: in transverse plane

Exercise programs emphasize the proper
sequencing of movements and control of
the body’s center of gravity.

Whole-body movement patterns that utilize gravity as resistance are
emphasized. Full ROM patterns with eccentric muscle action

The general timeframe for movement training is two to eight weeks.
Movement training: with a neighbor
brainstorm real life examples of the primary
movement exercises

Bend and lift

Single leg movements

Pushing movements

Forward

Overhead

Lateral

downward

Pulling movements

Rotational movements
Phase 3: Load Training

In phase 3, the exercise program is advanced with the addition of an external
force. (dumbbells, kettlebells, medicine balls, elastic tubing, tires)

Knowledge of exercise science related to resistance training is applied.

Exercise selection: start with single joint isometric and work towards total body
movements

Assessments of muscular strength and endurance are introduced.

Many clients will stay in this phase for many years. Let their goals dictate how
you advance

Before progressing to phase 4, clients should
develop the prerequisite strength necessary
to move into training for:

Power

Speed

Agility

Quickness
Phase 4: Performance Training

Phase 4 emphasizes specific training to improve speed, agility, quickness,
reactivity, and power. Maintain good posture and mobility






Power training enhances the velocity of force production (ability of large
muscles to produce a lot of force in a short time)
Many clients will not progress to this
stage of training.
Assessments for measuring power,
speed, agility, and quickness can
be performed.
Power training can also be effective
at helping clients improve body
composition.
Exercise selection: plyometric jump training, medicine ball throws,
kettlebell…
Goal: increase rate coding: speed at which the motor units stimulate
muscle to contract and produce force.

Minimize transition time between eccentric and concentric phase of muscle
action
Cardiorespiratory Training
Phase 1: Aerobic-base Training

Phase 1 is focused on developing an initial aerobic base in clients who have
been sedentary or near-sedentary.

The intent is to build improvements in:

Health

Endurance

Energy

Mood

Caloric expenditure

Exercise should be performed
at steady-state intensities in
the low-to-moderate intensity
range.

No assessments are recommended during the aerobic-base phase.

Monitor intensity using Talk test, should be below or at VT1 or RPE of 3 to 4.
Phase 2: Aerobic-efficiency Training

The second phase is dedicated to enhancing the client’s aerobic
efficiency by:
 Progressing
 Increasing
the frequency of sessions when possible
 Introducing

the program through increased duration of sessions
aerobic intervals
The goal of introducing intervals is to improve:
 Aerobic
 The
endurance by raising the intensity of exercise
client’s ability to utilize fat as a fuel source

Trainers can conduct the submaximal talk test to determine heart
rate at the first ventilatory threshold (VT1).

Some clients may perform cardiorespiratory exercise in this phase
for many years if they have no goals of improving performance.
Video explaining VT1 and VT2
http://www.acefitness.org/blog/1165/understanding-vt1-and-vt2
Phase 3: Anaerobic-endurance Training

During phase 3, the primary focus is to improve performance.

Assessment of the client’s cardiorespiratory capacity at the second
ventilatory threshold (VT2) is appropriate.

Higher-intensity intervals that develop anaerobic endurance are
introduced.

Balancing training time spent below VT1, between VT1 and VT2, and
at or above VT2 should be considered.

 Zone
1 (< VT1): 70–80% of training time
 Zone
2 (VT1 to < VT2): <10% of training time
 Zone
3 (> VT2): 10–20% of training time
The personal trainer should watch for signs of overtraining and scale
back the program if symptoms occur.
Phase 4: Anaerobic-power Training

The primary focus is building on previous training, while also introducing
new intervals for anaerobic power.

These intervals are short-duration, high-intensity, and very taxing.

Clients working in this phase:

Are training for competition

Have specific goals that relate to short-duration, high-intensity efforts
during longer endurance events

similar documents