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Report
Figure 3.1 Semiconductor diode.
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Figure 3.2 Volt-ampere characteristic for a typical small-signal silicon diode at a temperature of 300 K.
Notice the changes of scale.
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Figure 3.3 Zener diode symbol.
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Figure 3.4 Circuit for load-line analysis.
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Figure 3.5 Load-line analysis of the circuit
of Figure 3.4.
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Figure 3.6 Load-line analysis for Examples 3.1 and 3.2.
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Figure 3.7 Diode characteristic for Exercise 3.1.
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Figure 3.8 Ideal-diode volt--ampere characteristic.
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Figure 3.9 Analysis of a diode circuit using the ideal-diode model. See Example 3.3.
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Figure 3.10 Circuits for Exercise 3.4.
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Figure 3.11 Half-wave rectifier with resistive load.
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Figure 3.12a Half-wave rectifier with smoothing capacitor.
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Figure 3.12b & c Half-wave rectifier with smoothing capacitor.
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Figure 3.13 Full-wave rectifier.
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Figure 3.14 Diode-bridge full-wave rectifier.
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Figure 3.15a Clipper circuit.
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Figure 3.15b Clipper circuit.
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Figure 3.15c Clipper circuit.
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Figure 3.16 Circuits with nearly the same performance
as the circuit of Figure 3.15.
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Figure 3.17a & b See Exercise 3.7.
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Figure 3.17c See Exercise 3.7.
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Figure 3.17d See Exercise 3.7.
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Figure 3.18a & b See Exercise 3.8.
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Figure 3.18c See Exercise 3.8.
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Figure 3.18d See Exercise 3.8.
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Figure 3.19 Example clamp circuit.
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Figure 3.20 See Exercise 3.9.
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Figure 3.21 Answer for Exercise 3.10.
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Figure 3.22 Answer for Exercise 3.11.
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Figure 3.23 Diode logic gates.
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Figure 3.24 A voltage regulator supplies constant voltage to a load.
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Figure 3.25 A simple regulator circuit that provides a nearly constant output voltage from a variable supply voltage.
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Figure 3.26 See Example 3.4
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Figure 3.27 Analysis of a circuit containing a singular nonlinear element can be accomplished by
load-line analysis of a simplified circuit.
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Figure 3.28 See Example 3.5.
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Figure 3.29 Zener diode characteristic for Example 3.5.
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Figure 3.30 See Exercise 3.13.
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Figure 3.31 Diode characteristic, illustrating the Q-point.
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Figure 3.32 Illustration of diode currents.
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Figure 3.33 Variable attenuator using a diode as a controlled resistance.
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Figure 3.34 Dc circuit equivalent to Figure 3.33 for Q-point analysis.
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Figure 3.35 Small-signal ac equivalent circuit for Figure 3.33.
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Figure 3.36 Intrinsic silicon crystal.
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Figure 3.37 Thermal energy can break a bond, creating a vacancy and a free electron,
both of which can move freely through the crystal.
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Figure 3.38 As electrons move to the left to fill a hole, the hole moves to the right.
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Figure 3.39 n-type silicon is created by adding valence five impurity atoms.
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Figure 3.40 p-type silicon is created by adding valence three impurity atoms.
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Figure 3.41a Shockley--Haynes experiment.
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Figure 3.41b Shockley--Haynes experiment.
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Figure 3.41c Shockley--Haynes experiment.
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Figure 3.42 If a pn junction could be formed by joining a p-type crystal to an n-type crystal, a sharp gradient of
hole concentration and electron concentration would exist at the junction immediately after joining the crystals.
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Figure 3.43a Diffusion of majority carriers into the opposite sides causes a depletion region to appear at the junction.
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Figure 3.43b Diffusion of majority carriers into the opposite sides causes a depletion region to appear at the junction.
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Figure 3.43c Diffusion of majority carriers into the opposite sides causes a depletion region to appear at the junction.
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Figure 3.44 Under reverse bias, the depletion region becomes wider.
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Figure 3.45 Carrier concentrations versus distance for a forward-biased pn junction.
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Figure 3.46 Parallel-plate capacitor.
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Figure 3.47 As the reverse bias voltage becomes greater, the charge stored in the depletion region increases.
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Figure 3.48 Depletion capacitance versus bias voltage for the 1N4148 diode.
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Figure 3.49 Hole concentration versus distance for two values of forward current.
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Figure 3.50 Small-signal linear circuits for the pn-junction diode.
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Figure 3.51 Circuit illustrating switching behavior of a pn-junction diode.
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Figure 3.52a Waveforms for the circuit of Figure 3.51.
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Figure 3.52b Waveforms for the circuit of Figure 3.51.
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Figure 3.52c Waveforms for the circuit of Figure 3.51.
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Figure 3.53 Another set of waveforms for the circuit of Figure 3.51. Notice the absence of a storage interval.
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Figure 3.54 Circuit used to display the V - I characteristics of the 1N750 Zener diode.
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Figure 3.57 SPICE generated plot for the 1N750 Zener diode at 25°C.
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Figure 3.59 1N750 characteristics for temperature ranging from 0 to 100°C in 25° increments.
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