Gabriel Augusto Sanchez

Report
A Nation of Change: Mapping Race and Poverty in the United States
By: Gabriel Augusto Sanchez (UCLA)
Faculty Adviser: Professor Matthew Snipp, Sociology
Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality (CPI)
Research
Question:
Research
Question
How have the economic circumstances
for ethnic and racial groups in the
United States. changed from 2000 to
2010?
Analysis
Initial Analysis
Findings
2000 Decennial Census
2011 ACS 5-Year Estimates
White Population
Background:
With the election of President Barack
Obama, many have argued that the
U.S. has become a post-racial society,
implying race has become an
unimportant factor in determining
opportunity in the country. However,
major disparities between Whites and
racial minorities continue to exist in
areas such as socioeconomic status
and education attainment (Bonilla-Silva
2008).
In 2011, Professors Snipp and Cheung
examined changes in racial and gender
inequality since 1970. By observing the
income differences between Whites,
Blacks, American Indians, Latinos,
Filipinos, Chinese and Japanese and
found the income disparity between
White men and Latinos and American
Indians increased.
Percent Below Poverty Line
Percent Below Poverty Line
0.000000 - 6.740000
0.000000 - 7.250000
7.250001 - 10.630000
10.630001 - 14.000000
14.000001 - 18.050000
18.050001 - 24.910000
24.910001 - 42.210000
6.740001 - 9.850000
9.850001 - 13.050000
13.050001 - 17.240000
17.240001 - 24.950000
24.950001 - 47.910000
Black Population
Percent Below Poverty Line
Percent Below Poverty Line
Based on initial observation, poverty
status for each racial group has
diminished in some regions while
emerging in others.
0.000000 - 8.250000
10.190001 - 23.830000
23.830001 - 36.190000
36.190001 - 51.700000
51.700001 - 77.420000
77.420001 - 100.000000
8.250001 - 21.070000
21.070001 - 32.780000
32.780001 - 47.540000
47.540001 - 75.000000
75.000001 - 100.000000
Moving Forward:
Latino Population
Whether poverty status has increased
for each particular racial group remains
unclear since many factors must be
considered.
Percent Below Poverty Line
0.000000 - 8.580000
8.580001 - 18.030000
18.030001 - 27.030000
27.030001 - 38.540000
38.540001 - 57.950000
Percent Below Poverty Line
0.000000 - 11.430000
11.430001 - 23.460000
23.460001 - 34.760000
34.760001 - 49.440000
49.440001 - 71.430000
57.950001 - 100.000000
71.430001 - 100.000000
Asian Population
The racial groups include: White, Black,
Latino, American Indian, Asian, Native
Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, Some
Other Race, Two or More Races.
The data was then translated into maps
illustrating concentrations of poverty for
each racial group using Geographic
Information Systems (GIS).
The white spaces in some of the maps
indicate that there is no member of that
particular racial group within the
specific county living in poverty, or that
little to no one from the racial group
lives in the region. Also, more white
squares appear on the maps with the
2011 ACS 5-year estimates than the
maps with the 2000 Decennial Census
data since the former is a sample
estimate.
0.000000 - 10.190000
Method:
Data regarding population size and
poverty status by race throughout each
U.S. county was pulled from the 2000
and 2010 Decennial Census and 2011
American Community Survey (ACS) 5year estimates.
The illustrations (center) displayed are
eight of the various maps created that
depict the percentage of persons living
at or below the poverty line for White,
Black, Latino and Asian populations
throughout each U.S. county.
Percent Below Poverty Line
Percent Below Poverty Line
0.000000 - 5.320000
0.000000 - 5.480000
5.320001 - 14.950000
14.950001 - 27.180000
27.180001 - 44.440000
44.440001 - 73.330000
73.330001 - 100.000000
5.480001 - 15.960000
15.960001 - 29.830000
29.830001 - 49.040000
49.040001 - 77.780000
77.780001 - 100.000000
The population size of each racial
group and their overall percentage in
poverty must be calculated in order to
assess whether or not poverty status
has increased. Data on each racial
group’s population has been pulled
from the 2010 Decennial Census and
translated into maps to continue this
analysis.
Additionally, an examination of how the
economic and political climate at the
time affected poverty status would help
to provide better context for these
results. The recent recession and
legislation passed during this period are
examples of key events that might have
affected poverty status.

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