DOES - WDCEP

Report
Department of Employment Services
Washington, DC’s lead workforce development and labor agency
DoingBusiness2.0:
Finding Talent and Labor Laws
DOES Resources to Help District Businesses Find Talent
March 7, 2012
District of Columbia
Vincent C. Gray, Mayor
Department of Employment Services
Hugh Bailey, Associate Director
Department of Employment Services
Washington, DC’s lead workforce development and labor agency
The mission of DOES is…
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Department of Employment Services
Washington, DC’s lead workforce development and labor agency
Mayor Gray Has Reinvigorated The
Workforce Investment Council (WIC)
• This federally-required body now reports to DMPED.
• The majority of participants is comprised of business leaders.
• Michael Harreld, Regional President of PNC Bank, is the new WIC
Chair and Joslyn Williams, President of the AFL-CIO Metropolitan
Washington Council, is the new WIC Vice-Chair.
• Virtually inactive over the last few years, this entity will not only
inform public workforce development policy, it will also oversee
robust and stringent DOES Career Center certification and training
provider performance.
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Department of Employment Services
Washington, DC’s lead workforce development and labor agency
Mayor Gray Is Establishing
A Workforce Intermediary
• Long touted as a best practice, DC will finally see the establishment of a
Workforce Intermediary.
• On December 21, 2011, Mayor Gray signed Bill 19-50, “Workforce
Intermediary Establishment and Reform of First Source Amendment Act
of 2011.”
• The Workforce Intermediary will focus on the construction and hospitality
industries and will report to the WIC.
• The Workforce Intermediary will ensure proper training and matching of
District residents to available jobs.
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Department of Employment Services
Washington, DC’s lead workforce development and labor agency
New First Source Law
• Bill 19-50, “Workforce Intermediary Establishment and Reform of
First Source Amendment Act of 2011” signed by Mayor in December
• Law was projected to take effect on February 24 but the District has not
yet received approval from Congress, so as of March 5, the new law is not
yet in effect
– Makes sweeping changes to the First Source Employment Agreement
Act of 1984, but still requires 51% of all new hires on government
contracts to be District residents (same as previous law)
– Eliminates contracts under $300K from First Source obligations
• Requires each construction project receiving government assistance
totaling $5 million or more to have the following percentage of DC
residents on those projects:
– 20% of journey worker hours; 60% of apprentice hours; 51% of skilled
laborer hours; 70% of common laborer hours
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Department of Employment Services
Washington, DC’s lead workforce development and labor agency
Summary of Major Changes (continued)
• Requires creation of a Workforce Intermediary Pilot Program,
established to match job seekers and employers
• Mandates that retail and commercial tenants are subject to
hiring requirements for 5 years following the commencement
of the tenant’s initial lease date
• Employers can “double count” hours for the “hard to
employ”
• Employers are given choice to report either by contractor or
sub-contractors for construction projects only
• Contractors must submit monthly and cumulative certified
payrolls from all subcontractors at any tier working on the
project or contract
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Department of Employment Services
Washington, DC’s lead workforce development and labor agency
Summary of Major Changes (continued)
•
•
Adds additional monthly reporting requirements for contractors between
$300,000 and $5M
Employers must report:
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# of employees who worked on the project
# of current employees transferred
# of new job openings created
# of job openings created by employee attrition
# of job openings listed with the Department of Employment Services
total monthly direct and indirect labor costs associated with the project or contract
total # of all District residents hired for the reporting period
cumulative total # of District residents hired
each employee’s name, Social Security Number, job title, hire date, residence, and
referral source for all new hires
No work associated with the relevant government assistance can begin on a
project or contract until the employment agreement has been accepted by the
Department of Employment Services
Contract end dates established when Certificate of Occupancy is issued
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Department of Employment Services
Washington, DC’s lead workforce development and labor agency
Summary of Major Changes (continued)
•
DOES will receive the First Source Employment Agreement no less than 7
calendar days in advance of the project or contract start date, whichever is
later
•
Allows DOES to consider altering the ratio of journey worker to apprentice
positions based on a compelling District-resident hiring rationale
•
DOES must provide on-line public access to executed First Source
Employment Agreements, current compliance status of each project, and
the contact information for the relevant compliance officer – within 120
days of effective date of act from 2009 through present
•
Analysis of hiring percentages at least every three years mandated
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Department of Employment Services
Washington, DC’s lead workforce development and labor agency
One City • One Hire
While the One City • One Hire program is modeled after Atlanta’s
Hire One program, there are key differences between the two
programs to address the unique characteristics of DC’s employer
market and our job-seeker needs.
Both are designed to encourage businesses to hire, stimulate the
economy, and put people back to work.
DC
•Government-initiated; not employer-led
• Sector-based strategy
• Only for DC Residents
• Offers government incentives
•Connects employers directly with DOES
services
ATL
•Employer-driven
•Not sector-based
•Focused on hiring in region
•No government incentives
associated with program
Department of Employment Services
Washington, DC’s lead workforce development and labor agency
One City • One Hire
It's as Easy as 1-2-3 to hire pre-qualified DC residents and receive
Tax Credits, Training Subsidies, or Wage Reimbursements.
 Step 1 - Our One City • One Hire team meets with you
to develop a hiring strategy.
 Step 2 – We build a customized action plan to
meticulously match candidates to meet your hiring needs.
 Step 3 – We jointly execute an event where the pre-
screened candidates are presented to you, ready to be
hired…on the spot.
Participating in One City • One Hire grows your business, supports our
city, positively impacts our local economy, and helps support families.
Visit OneCityOneHire.org for more information!
Department of Employment Services
Washington, DC’s lead workforce development and labor agency
One City • One Hire
Over 513 Employers have hired…
2,100 DC residents & counting…
Won’t you join us?
Visit OneCityOneHire.org for more information!
Department of Employment Services
Washington, DC’s lead workforce development and labor agency
New DOES Programs and Initiatives
Designed to Put DC Residents to Work
• On-the-Job Training Initiative (Local)
– Offers incentives to employers to train/hire long-term unemployed
District residents
– Reimbursement of up to 50% or more of gross wages paid during
training period
• Entrepreneurial Initiatives
– DOES currently has entrepreneurial initiatives and employment
strategies for the District’s unemployed residents, returning
citizens, and disconnected youth
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