CSE565-F10-Lec-08

Report
Algorithm Design and Analysis
LECTURE 8
Greedy Graph Alg’s II
• Implementing Dijkstra
• MST
Adam Smith
9/10/10
A. Smith; based on slides by E. Demaine, C. Leiserson, S. Raskhodnikova, K. Wayne
Rough algorithm (Dijkstra)
• Maintain a set of explored nodes S whose shortest path
distance d(u) from s to u is known.
• Initialize S = { s }, d(s) = 0.
• Repeatedly choose unexplored node v which minimizes
 (v ) 
min
e  (u ,v ) : u S
d (u )   ( e ) ,
• add v to S, and set d(v) = (v).
shortest path to some u in explored
part, followed by a single edge (u, v)
d(u)
(e)
v
u
S
s
9/10/10
A. Smith; based on slides by E. Demaine, C. Leiserson, S. Raskhodnikova, K. Wayne
Review Question
• Is Dijsktra’s algorithm correct with
negative edge weights?
9/10/10
A. Smith; based on slides by E. Demaine, C. Leiserson, S. Raskhodnikova, K. Wayne
Proof of Correctness
(Greedy Stays Ahead)
Invariant. For each node u  S, d(u) is the length of
the shortest path from s to u.
x
P'
Proof: (by induction on |S|)
s
• Base case: |S| = 1 is trivial.
u
S
• Inductive hypothesis: Assume for |S| = k  1.
P
y
v
– Let v be next node added to S, and let (u,v) be the chosen edge.
– The shortest s-u path plus (u,v) is an s-v path of length (v).
– Consider any s-v path P. We'll see that it's no shorter than (v).
– Let (x,y) be the first edge in P that leaves S,
and let P' be the subpath to x.
– P + (x,y) has length · d(x)+ (x,y)· (y)· (v)
9/10/10
A. Smith; based on slides by E. Demaine, C. Leiserson, S. Raskhodnikova, K. Wayne
Implementation
•For unexplored nodes, maintain
 ( v )  min
e  ( u , v ) :u  S
d ( u )   ( e ).
– Next node to explore = node with minimum (v).
– When exploring v, for each edge e = (v,w), update
 ( w )  min {  ( w ),  ( v )   ( e )}.
Priority Queue
•Efficient implementation: Maintain a priority
queue of unexplored nodes, prioritized by (v).
9/10/10
A. Smith; based on slides by E. Demaine, C. Leiserson, S. Raskhodnikova, K. Wayne
Priority queues
• Maintain a set of items with priorities (= “keys”)
– Example: jobs to be performed
• Operations:
–
–
–
–
Insert
Increase key
Decrease key
Extract-min: find and remove item with least key
• Common data structure: heap
– Time: O(log n) per operation
9/10/10
A. Smith; based on slides by E. Demaine, C. Leiserson, S. Raskhodnikova, K. Wayne
Pseudocode for Dijkstra(G, )
d[s]  0
for each v  V – {s}
do d[v]  [v]  
S
QV
⊳ Q is a priority queue maintaining V – S,
keyed on [v]
while Q  
do u  EXTRACT-MIN(Q)
S  S  {u}; d[u]  [u]
explore edges
for each v  Adjacency-list[u]
leaving v
do if [v] > [u] + (u, v)
then [v]  d[u] + (u, v)
9/10/10
Implicit DECREASE-KEY
A. Smith; based on slides by E. Demaine, C. Leiserson, S. Raskhodnikova, K. Wayne
Analysis of Dijkstra
n
times
while Q  
do u  EXTRACT-MIN(Q)
S  S  {u}
for each v  Adj[u]
degree(u)
do if  [v] >  [u] + w(u, v)
times
then  [v]   [u] + w(u, v)
Handshaking Lemma  ·m implicit DECREASE-KEY’s.
9/10/10
PQ Operation
Dijkstra
Array
Binary heap
d-way Heap
Fib heap †
ExtractMin
n
n
log n
HW3
log n
DecreaseKey
Total
m
1
n2
log n
m log n
HW3
m log m/n n
1
m + n log n
† Individual ops are amortized bounds
A. Smith; based on slides by E. Demaine, C. Leiserson, S. Raskhodnikova, K. Wayne
Minimum spanning tree (MST)
Input: A connected undirected graph G = (V, E)
with weight function w : E  R.
• For now, assume all edge weights are distinct.
Output: A spanning tree T — a tree that connects
all vertices — of minimum weight:
w(T )   w(u , v ) .
(u ,v )T
9/15/2008
A. Smith; based on slides by E. Demaine, C. Leiserson, S. Raskhodnikova, K. Wayne
Example of MST
6
12
9
5
14
8
3
9/15/2008
7
15
10
A. Smith; based on slides by E. Demaine, C. Leiserson, S. Raskhodnikova, K. Wayne
Example of MST
6
12
9
5
14
8
3
9/15/2008
7
15
10
A. Smith; based on slides by E. Demaine, C. Leiserson, S. Raskhodnikova, K. Wayne
Greedy Algorithms for MST
•Kruskal's: Start with T = . Consider edges in ascending
order of weights. Insert edge e in T unless doing so would
create a cycle.
•Reverse-Delete: Start with T = E. Consider edges in
descending order of weights. Delete edge e from T unless
doing so would disconnect T.
•Prim's: Start with some root node s. Grow a tree T from s
outward. At each step, add to T the cheapest edge e with
exactly one endpoint in T.
9/15/2008
A. Smith; based on slides by E. Demaine, C. Leiserson, S. Raskhodnikova, K. Wayne
Cycles and Cuts
•Cycle: Set of edges the form (a,b),(b,c),(c,d),…,(y,z),(z,a).
2
1
3
6
4
Cycle C = (1,2),(2,3),(3,4),(4,5),(5,6),(6,1)
5
8
7
•Cut: a subset of nodes S. The corresponding cutset D is the
subset of edges with exactly one endpoint in S.
1
2
3
6
4
S
5
7
9/15/2008
Cut S
= { 4, 5, 8 }
Cutset D = (5,6), (5,7), (3,4), (3,5),
(7,8)
8
A. Smith; based on slides by E. Demaine, C. Leiserson, S. Raskhodnikova, K. Wayne
Cycle-Cut Intersection
• Claim. A cycle and a cutset intersect in an even
number of edges.
• Proof: A cycle has to leave and enter the cut the
same number of times.
C
S
V - S
9/15/2008
A. Smith; based on slides by E. Demaine, C. Leiserson, S. Raskhodnikova, K. Wayne
Cut and Cycle Properties
•Cut property. Let S be a subset of nodes. Let e be the
min weight edge with exactly one endpoint in S. Then the
MST contains e.
•Cycle property. Let C be a cycle, and let f be the max
weight edge in C. Then the MST does not contain f.
f
S
e
e is in the MST
9/15/2008
C
f is not in the MST
A. Smith; based on slides by E. Demaine, C. Leiserson, S. Raskhodnikova, K. Wayne
Proof of Cut Property
Cut property: Let S be a subset of nodes. Let e be the min
weight edge with exactly one endpoint in S. Then the MST
T* contains e.
f
•Proof: (exchange argument)
S
– Suppose e does not belong to T*.
e
– Adding e to T* creates a cycle C in T*.
T*
– Edge e is both in the cycle C and in the cutset D corresponding to
S  there exists another edge, say f, that is in both C and D.
– T' = T*  { e } - { f } is also a spanning tree.
– Since ce < cf, cost(T') < cost(T*). Contradiction. ▪
9/15/2008
A. Smith; based on slides by E. Demaine, C. Leiserson, S. Raskhodnikova, K. Wayne
Proof of Cycle Property
Cycle property: Let C be a cycle in G. Let f be the max
weight edge in C. Then the MST T* does not contain f.
f
•Proof: (exchange argument)
S
– Suppose f belongs to T*.
e
– Deleting f from T* creates a cut S in T*.
T*
– Edge f is both in the cycle C and in the cutset D corresponding to
S  there exists another edge, say e, that is in both C and D.
– T' = T*  { e } - { f } is also a spanning tree.
– Since ce < cf, cost(T') < cost(T*). Contradiction. ▪
9/15/2008
A. Smith; based on slides by E. Demaine, C. Leiserson, S. Raskhodnikova, K. Wayne
Greedy Algorithms for MST
•Kruskal's: Start with T = . Consider edges in ascending
order of weights. Insert edge e in T unless doing so would
create a cycle.
•Reverse-Delete: Start with T = E. Consider edges in
descending order of weights. Delete edge e from T unless
doing so would disconnect T.
•Prim's: Start with some root node s. Grow a tree T from s
outward. At each step, add to T the cheapest edge e with
exactly one endpoint in T.
9/15/2008
A. Smith; based on slides by E. Demaine, C. Leiserson, S. Raskhodnikova, K. Wayne
Prim's Algorithm: Correctness
•Prim's algorithm. [Jarník 1930, Prim 1959]
– Apply cut property to S.
– When edge weights are
distinct, every edge that is
added must be in the MST
– Thus, Prim’s alg. outputs
the MST
9/15/2008
S
A. Smith; based on slides by E. Demaine, C. Leiserson, S. Raskhodnikova, K. Wayne
Correctness of Kruskal
• [Kruskal, 1956]: Consider edges
in ascending order of weight.
– Case 1: If adding e to T creates a
cycle, discard e according to cycle
property.
e
Case 1
v
S
e
u
– Case 2: Otherwise, insert e = (u, v)
into T according to cut property where
S = set of nodes in u's connected
component.
Case 2
9/15/2008
A. Smith; based on slides by E. Demaine, C. Leiserson, S. Raskhodnikova, K. Wayne
Review Questions
Let G be a connected undirected graph with distinct
edge weights. Answer true or false:
• Let e be the cheapest edge in G. Some MST of G
contains e?
• Let e be the most expensive edge in G. No MST
of G contains e?
9/15/2008
A. Smith; based on slides by E. Demaine, C. Leiserson, S. Raskhodnikova, K. Wayne
Non-distinct edges?
9/15/2008
A. Smith; based on slides by E. Demaine, C. Leiserson, S. Raskhodnikova, K. Wayne
Implementation of Prim(G,w)
IDEA: Maintain V – S as a priority queue Q (as in Dijkstra).
Key each vertex in Q with the weight of the leastweight edge connecting it to a vertex in S.
QV
key[v]   for all v  V
key[s]  0 for some arbitrary s  V
while Q  
do u  EXTRACT-MIN(Q)
for each v  Adjacency-list[u]
do if v  Q and w(u, v) < key[v]
then key[v]  w(u, v)
⊳ DECREASE-KEY
[v]  u
At the end, {(v, [v])} forms the MST.
9/15/2008
A. Smith; based on slides by E. Demaine, C. Leiserson, S. Raskhodnikova, K. Wayne
Analysis of Prim
QV
Q(n)
key[v]   for all v  V
total
key[s]  0 for some arbitrary s  V
while Q  
do u  EXTRACT-MIN(Q)
for each v  Adj[u]
n
do if v  Q and w(u, v) < key[v]
times degree(u)
times
then key[v]  w(u, v)
[v]  u
Handshaking Lemma  Q(m) implicit DECREASE-KEY’s.
Time: as in Dijkstra
9/15/2008
A. Smith; based on slides by E. Demaine, C. Leiserson, S. Raskhodnikova, K. Wayne
Analysis of Prim
n
times
while Q  
do u  EXTRACT-MIN(Q)
for each v  Adj[u]
degree(u)
do if v  Q and w(u, v) < key[v]
times
then key[v]  w(u, v)
[v]  u
Handshaking Lemma  Q(m) implicit DECREASE-KEY’s.
PQ Operation
Prim
Array
Binary heap
d-way Heap
Fib heap †
ExtractMin
n
n
log n
HW3
log n
DecreaseKey
Total
m
1
n2
log n
m log n
HW3
m log m/n n
1
m + n log n
† Individual ops are amortized bounds
9/15/2008
A. Smith; based on slides by E. Demaine, C. Leiserson, S. Raskhodnikova, K. Wayne
Greedy Algorithms for MST
•Kruskal's: Start with T = . Consider edges in ascending
order of weights. Insert edge e in T unless doing so would
create a cycle.
•Reverse-Delete: Start with T = E. Consider edges in
descending order of weights. Delete edge e from T unless
doing so would disconnect T.
•Prim's: Start with some root node s. Grow a tree T from s
outward. At each step, add to T the cheapest edge e with
exactly one endpoint in T.
9/15/2008
A. Smith; based on slides by E. Demaine, C. Leiserson, S. Raskhodnikova, K. Wayne
Union-Find Data Structures
Operation\ Implementation Array + linked-lists and
sizes
Balanced Trees
Find (worst-case)
ϴ(1)
ϴ(log n)
Union of sets A,B
(worst-case)
ϴ(min(|A|,|B|) (could be as
large as ϴ(n)
ϴ(log n)
Amortized analysis: k unions ϴ(k log k)
and k finds, starting from
singletons
ϴ(k log k)
•With modifications, amortized time for tree structure is O(n Ack(n)),
where Ack(n), the Ackerman function grows much more slowly than log n.
•See KT Chapter 4.6
9/15/2008
A. Smith; based on slides by E. Demaine, C. Leiserson, S. Raskhodnikova, K. Wayne

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