Chapter 6

Report
Seminar 228.443:
Advertising
Dr. Teri Shaffer
1
IMC Campaign Outline
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Introduction
Situation analysis
SWOT analysis
Key strategy decisions
The creative plan
2
The Creative Plan
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Creative process & person
Creative strategy
Writing print ads
Writing radio ads
Writing tv ads
Writing interactive ads
3
Creativity
“…art of establishing new and meaningful
relationships between previously unrelated
things in a manner that is relevant,
believable, and in good taste but which
somehow presents the product in a new
light.” Leo Burnett
4
Exhibit 13-1 (Page 409)
Creativity Is the Search for New and
Different Viewpoints.
5
The Creative Process
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Preparation---immersion and gathering raw
material
Mental digestion---constantly thinking
Incubation---daydreaming
Illumination---idea appears out of nowhere
Application---puts idea into action
6
Brainstorming
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Group of
people to
generate many
ideas by
playing off of
each other’s
ideas.
7
Rules of Brainstorming
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Anything goes
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No criticism
The more the better
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Quantity of ideas is directly related to quality
of ideas
8
The Creative Personality
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We are all born with some degree of
“creativity”
Creative people tend to be:
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Independent
Self assertive
Persistent
Self disciplined
Tolerant of ambiguity
9
Creative Strategy
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What advertising is going to say
How it will be said
Best advertisements are:
Simple
Clear
Definite focus
10
Components of Creative Strategy
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Advertising objectives
Target audience profile
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Buying habits, lifestyles, & motivations
 Personal profile (Exhibit 13-8 on page 422)
Key consumer benefit (USP)
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11
Unique Selling Proposition
(USP)
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M & M’s--”Melts in Your Mouth, Not in Your
Hands”
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Maytag---Friendly Repairman
12
Components of Creative Strategy
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Advertising objectives
Target audience profile
Key consumer benefit (USP)
Strategic approach
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Product positioning, appeals used, & how
USP will be presented
13
Positioning Statement
“Hallmark is the most convenient greeting card
because it offers the best selection, most thoughtful
verse, and emotional content that matches the
sender’s thoughts with the receiver’s needs. This
results in a successful care purchase without spending
a lot of time looking. There is a sense of reliability,
comfort, and confidence in knowing that Hallmark
will have the right card. The consumer’s choice can
revolve around which card is best, rather than which
card comes closest in either location or quality.”
14
Components of Creative Strategy
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Advertising objectives
Target audience profile
Key consumer benefit (USP)
Strategic approach
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Product positioning, appeals used, & how
will USP be presented
If no USP, other basic strategic approaches
Exhibit 13.9 on page 423
15
Components of Creative Strategy
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Advertising objectives
Target audience profile
Key consumer benefit (U SP)
Strategic approach
Support
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Provide writers with supporting details
Tone, style, and manner
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Brand personality to be conveyed
16
Putting Strategy Into Writing
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Creative platform
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Plan for more than one ad
Copy platform
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Plan for each ad
17
Advertising Campaign
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...a series of related advertisements that
have a common theme, common slogan,
and have a common set of advertising
appeals
18
Theme
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General feeling
or emotions
19
Slogan
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“Battle cry” of the advertiser
...a short written or verbal message
“Come see the softer side of Sears.”
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Theme and Slogan Examples
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Pillsbury Doughboy
Nothing spells loving
like something
cooking in the oven.
21
Theme and Slogan Examples
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Taco Bell
Dog
“Yo Quire Taco Bell”
22
Advertising Appeals
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Something that makes the product
particularly attractive or interesting to the
consumer. i.e. security, esteem
23
Example: Advertising Appeals
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Bayer Aspirin
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Relieves headaches
Caffeine free
Sodium free
Pain relief
Recognized brand name
Reduces heart attacks
Reduces inflammation from arthritis
24
Words and Advertising
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Copy
Copywriter
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From the Internet
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Copywriting Tips (an extensive guide to
writing copy and creating ads)
Nomm de Plume
http://nomm.com/copywriting.htm
26
Writing for Print Advertising
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Illustrations or visuals
Body copy
Slogans & taglines
Logotypes or
signature cuts
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Elements
Headlines
Overlines &
underlines
Subheadings
Captions
27
Headlines
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Most important verbal element
According to David Oglivy, it is 5x more
important than body copy
Goal of headline: GAIN ATTENTION
28
David Oglivy’s Techniques
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Promise a benefit
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“I hate situps. I hate situps. I hate situps. I
hate situps. I hate situps.” Rollarblade
29
David Oglivy’s Techniques
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Inject news
“Announcing the most significant fleet to
enter the Caribbean since the Nina, Pinta,
and Santa Maria.” American Airlines
30
David Oglivy’s Techniques
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Provide useful information
“I know I should quit. Don’t tell me why,
tell me how.” Nicoderm
31
David Oglivy’s Techniques
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Include Brand Name
“The good news is Jeep Grand Cherokee is
now available with a V8. There is no bad
news.”
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David Oglivy’s Techniques
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Select your target audience
“Exactly how mad is she?” American
Floral Marketing Council
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David Oglivy’s Techniques
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Be specific
“Fifteen dealerships into their search, Barry
and Cynthia Nelson felt like throwing in
the towel.” Saturn
34
Most Common
Types of Headlines
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Benefit---promises a reward
News---promises that if read, get
information
Curiosity---intriguing question or creative
play on words
35
Benefit
Headline
36
News
Headline
37
Curiosity
Headline
38
Subheadings
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Organizational headings
Overline
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Underline
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Above headline
After headline
Smaller than headline but larger than copy
39
Subheadings: Overline
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Subheading: Underline
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Captions
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Under or next to photographs or
illustrations
Help reader interpret them
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Caption
Doubles
as
Headline
43
Body Copy
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Heart & substance
Type is smaller than headline/subheadings
Follow through on headline and illustration
theme
“You approach”---writing to one person
44
Structure of Body Copy
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Lead paragraph
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Interior body copy
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Continues with main idea, transition to more
specific selling points
Most of selling takes place
Closing paragraph
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Move reader to action
45
Tagline
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Slogan
Brita example: “Tap into great taste.”
46
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Types of Body Copy
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Straightforward
Narrative
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Uses a story to get point across
Dialogue
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Better suited for radio and television
Dialogue between people
Testimonial---person speaks to audience
48
White Space
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Large areas
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Openness, exclusivity, and simplicity
Busyness
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Excitement, curiosity
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Hallmark
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K2 Skates
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Balance
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Distribution of elements around imaginary
vertical line
Formal balance---symmetrical
Informal balance---asymmetrical
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Formal
Balance
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Informal
Balance
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Proportion
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Relationship in size between elements
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Parker
Pen
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Color
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Reds = excitement
Earth tones = warmth
Greens = nature
Blacks = richness and sophistication
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Intensity
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Brightness
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Excitement
Subdued
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Peacefulness
58
Contrast
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Lightness
or darkness
Neiman Marcus
59
General Steps in a Layout
Thumbnail Sketches
Preliminary Sketches
Rough Layouts
Ads Done to Size Without Attention to Looks
Semicomps
Layout Drawn to Size, Used for Presentations
Comprehensives
Art is Finished, Designed to Impress Audience
Mechanical
Largely Computer Based and Generated to Guide
Color Separations
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Writing for Outdoor
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7 words or less for headline
Great source for examples
Outdoor Advertising Association of
America, Inc.
http://www.oaaa.org/zzroutside/OBIEAwar
ds/OBIE2000Results.htm
65
Outdoor Advertising
66
Writing for Radio
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“Theater-of-the-mind”
Dramatic use of voices, music, and sound
effects
Write the way people speak
Short sentences, fragments, and phrases
2 words per second
67
Radio Formats
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Pitch format
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Slice-of-life or situation format
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Straight announcement
Pitch for product at end
Song format
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Jingle
Donut (song then announcement)
68
Radio Scripts
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Single column
Voices identified
Sound effects noted
69
Writing for Television
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Pictures tell the story
Should be able to tell story without audio
Example: Polaroid
Key visual symbol
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One frame sums up entire commercial
70
Most Common Types of TV Ads
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Demonstration
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Glad-Lock bags
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Most Common
Types of TV Ads
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Testimonials
Ordinary person
Expert endorsers
Celebrity
endorsers
72
Most Common Types of TV Ads
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Presenters
“The talking head”
73
Most Common Types of TV Ads
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Slice-of-Life
Story
74
Most Common Types of TV Ads
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Lifestyle/Emotion
Focus on interests and activities
75
Most Common Types of TV Ads
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Animation
Claymation
76
Humor
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Effective, but…
Difficult to write
Can overwhelm the product
Wears out so need a large pool of ads
Vampire creativity
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People remember ad but not product/source
77
Music
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Can set mood
Jingles can serve as memory devices
78
Writing for Television
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Storyboards
Roughly sketched
79
Storyboard
80
Writing for Television
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Storyboards
Roughly sketched
Photoboard
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Still photographs
Exhibit 15-9
Stealamatic
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Steal footage from other commercials
81
Writing for Interactive Media
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Web sites
Banner ads
82
Guidelines
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Sensitive to time it takes to retrieve
information
Response and feedback mechanisms
Dynamic
Worldwide so prepare for response
IMC
83
Criteria for a Good Ad
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“BDMS”
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Believable
Distinctive
Memorable
Simple
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84

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