A PowerPoint Presentation on Theory of Operation and setup tutorial

Report
Teldat VisorALARM Plus2U
Honeywell IP Communicator
Tech Support Training
Nick Martello
Martello Consulting
Chesterfield, VA
100% Supervision
Part I: Introduction and Overview
•Model Review
•Part Numbers
•Ancillary parts
•Theory of Operation
© Martello Consulting, 2009
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IP Communicator Review (Obsolete Models)
Picture
Model
Type of Alarm
Panel
supported
Sold in
IP
Supervision
to the ARC
Customer IP
server
supervision
mIP-Plus US Burglar/Intrusion USA, Canada
N/A
Rest of the
Burglar/Intrusion World (EMEA,
mIP-Plus RW
& Fire
LATAM,
ASIAPAC)
IPDACT
Fire
USA, Canada
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N/A
U/D over
the PSTN
U/D over
TCP/IP
UL Certificates &
Approvals
N/A
UL1023
UL1076
UL1610
ULC C1023-1974
ULC/ORD (C1076 M1986)
CAN/ULC S304 - M88
N/A
N/A
N/A
UL864
ULC Pending
Latest Models (IPDACT-2 and IPDACT-2UD)
Picture
Model
Type of Alarm
Panel supported
Sold in
mIP-UD US
Burglar/Intrusion
USA, Canada
mIP-UD RW
Burglar/Intrusion &
Fire
Rest of the
World (EMEA,
LATAM,
ASIAPAC)
IPDACT-2UD
Fire
USA, Canada
IP
Supervision
to the ARC
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Customer IP
server
supervision
U/D over
the PSTN
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
U/D over
TCP/IP
Honeywell Life System Part Numbers
IPDACT-2
Internet Communicator-Contact ID only.
Requires compatible FL panel equipped with
on-board or optional DACT. Requires 136mA
aux non-reset able power from FACP without
2UD modem. Includes cable from panel
primary Telco port to IPDACT. Photo shows
2UD model with modem plugged in.
IPDACT-2UD
Internet Communicator-Contact ID only.
Requires compatible FL panel equipped with
on-board or optional DACT. Requires 155mA
aux non-reset able power from FACP to
support on board 2UD modem. Includes
cable from panel primary Telco port to
IPDACT.
2UD
Modem option to turn IPDACT-2 into IPDACT2UD
IPBRKT
Bracket for mounting IPDACT inside MS9200UDLS common enclosure or in optional
HPP-300ULX power supply
IPSPLT
Splitter for dual phone lines to IPDACT input
cable.
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Parts List
IPENC
Optional cabinet for mounting IPDACT
next to compatible Fire-Lite FACP. Use
when connecting to older non
common enclosure panels such as MS9200UD or MS-9600. Includes IPBRKT
mounting bracket already installed.
HP300ULX
Optional UL listed Fire Aux power
supply for mounting IPDACT next to
compatible Fire Panel when additional
power is required for IPDACT.
VisorALARM 2U PLUS
PN: ALREH-220
UL Listed IP receiver for Teldat & FireLite IP communicators
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Additional Part numbers
NOTE: For purposes of this presentation, the Teldat mIP IP UL listed communicator models used in connection
to Honeywell Life System fire panels are known as models IPDACT-2 and IPDACT-2UD respectively.
© Martello Consulting, 2009
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System Overview
90 second supervision
© Martello Consulting, 2009
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Theory of Operation
•The IP Communicators replace the telephone line with an
Ethernet connection.
•No changes are made to the panel dialer setup.
•The IP card simulates a standard PSTN analog line to the
panel.
•During an event, the IP card senses off-hook status, counts
the digits of the dialed phone number then begins collecting
Contact ID data.
•The IP card “frames” the Contact ID data using UDP packets
with 512 bit AES encryption and forwards it to the receiver.
•The Receiver decrypts and un-packetizes the data and
presents ASCII data to automation software in a
preprogrammed format.
•The automation software or the receiver can provide the
kiss-off signal to the panel.
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Theory of Operation-UD
•The release of the 2UD models and firmware release 6.0
provides a modem feature to the IP communicator.
•This feature uses TCP/IP vs UDP to provide upload/download
services to the panel from anywhere in the Internet.
•The card contains a V.32 bis modem capable of up to 14,4KB
speeds-however most Honeywell Life System fire panels will
only operate at a max of 2400 baud.
•A special virtual port program is used on the programming PC
called UDPORT.exe. This program redirects modem signals
from the programming software from the standard ports to a
virtual Ethernet port.
•The software allows entry of the receiver’s IP address and
TCP port to use along with username and password.
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Theory of Operation UD-continued
•With standard remote programming via PSTN, the user
enters a panel phone number to call.
•This same number is also used as a database entry in the
subscriber field of the target IPDACT db record in the
receiver.
•Since the VisorALARM “knows” how to poll the remote card,
this subscriber field is used as a database lookup for which
panel to call.
•The on-board modem on the IP card converts the digital
encapsulated modem signals back to analog phone signals at
the remote site.
•The panel then sees a “ring” and answers the call.
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Standard Alarm Event Transmission Operation
Alarm Panel
Dialer
capture
mIP-2/
IPDACT-2UD Internet
Automation
Software (1)
VisorALARM
Serial
line
Line picked up
Calling
Contact-ID Alarm
Alarm Kissoff
Call Disconnect
(1)
IP Alarm
Alarm in wellknown format
Alarm ACK
Alarm Kissoff
The alarm is never lost on the way:
The Alarm is ACK’d only if the
Automation Software has kissed it off
Other Automation SW types: IBS, MICROKEY, MASterMind, BOLD, DICE
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Part II: Network Concepts
•IP Address Formats
•Subnetting
•Determining a Network Address
- IP Calc
•Private Networks and Subnets
•The importance of defining the receiver as “classless”
•Ping
•Traceroute
- http://Network Tools.com
•IP Transmission Concepts
•NAPT (Network Address Port Translation)
•Teldat Security Concepts (ARLY)
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IP Address Concepts
•IP address format: octet.octet.octet.octet
•The IP address and mask defines the IP network
address and host network address
•Example:
192.198.1.200 /24
Mask: “/24” = “255.255.255.0”
Network Host
•In order for a device to reach any host in a remote
(i.e. different) IP network, a default Gateway is
required.
•It is the default gateway’s responsibility to transfer
the IP traffic to the remote network.
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IP Addresses and Subnets
•Sub netting works by applying the concept of extended
network addresses to individual computer (and other
network device) addresses.
•An extended network address includes both a network
address and additional bits that represent the subnet
number... (see below)
•Together, these two data elements support a two-level
addressing scheme recognized by standard implementations
of IP. The network address and subnet number, when
combined with the host address, therefore support a threelevel scheme
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Understanding IP Addresses
Private Intranet
For every additional bit set to '1' in the mask,
another bit becomes available in the subnet number
to index additional subnets. A two-bit subnet number
can support up to four subnets, a three-bit number
supports up to eight subnets, and so on.
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Private Networks and Subnets
•The governing bodies that administer Internet Protocol have
reserved certain networks for internal uses.
•In general, intranets utilizing these networks gain more
control over managing their IP configuration and Internet
access.
•This sub-netting permits organizations to prohibit access to
machines from certain other machines.
•The default subnet masks associated with these private
networks are listed below.
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Classless Routing
•Classless Inter-Domain Routing (CIDR) is a mechanism
introduced to slow the growth of routing tables on routers
across the internet, and to help prevent waste of IP
addresses by allocating a subset (as opposed to whole
chunks) of a Class A, B ,or C network to ISP's and
organizations.
•It allows for address specified in CIDR notation, address
aggregation and easier delegation of address blocks.
•It is important to include the term classless in the receiver’s
config file just below the router entry.
•Failure to do so may cause routing problems and “lost”
mIPS.
•See “Fine Tuning” the configuration later in this
presentation.
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Basic Useful IP Tests-PING
•The ping utility checks whether a host is alive and reachable
or not. This is done by sending an ICMP Echo Request packet
to the host, and waiting for an ICMP Echo Reply from the
host. (See example below)
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Basic Useful IP Tests-Traceroute
•Traceroute is a program that can show the route over the
network between two systems, listing all the intermediate
routers a connection must pass through to get to its
destination.
•It can help determine why connections to a given server
might be poor, and can often help determine where exactly
the problem is.
•It can also show how systems are connected to each other,
letting you see how an ISP connects to the Internet as well as
how the target system is connected.
•Easy to use Traceroute tools are available even for Vista.
- Go to http://network-tools.com/
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Traceroute Example
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IP transmission basic concepts
Host A
TCP/UDP
Host B
Peer-to-peer
TCP/UDP
IP
IP
Link
Link
Def GW for host B
Def GW for host A
IP Network
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Teldat IP Basics -IPDACT Security
•Highest security level in the industry:
- All IP traffic exchanged is encrypted with a 512-bit AES algorithm
(Grade AA for UL1610).
- The configuration access is password protected.
•IPDACT installer & configuration passwords can be centrally
managed.
•Any IPDACT parameter can be managed from the central
station via individual IP address or group config pattern.
•Anti-device substitution protection based on non-writable
IPDACT specific information.
•Anti-replay protection to avoid man-in-the-middle attacks
- ‘sequential marked’ frames.
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Teldat IP Basics -Supervision
•Firewall compatibility:
- All communication begins at the IPDACT side so it becomes a trusted
host behind the customer’s firewall.
- The IPDACT to VisorALARM communication only requires one UDP
port.
•Low UDP bandwidth vs TCP/IP:
- Contact frame (once, when IPDACT boots up)  72 bytes
 Polling frames  24 bytes
 Alarm frames  56 bytes
•IP comm. supervision.
•PSTN supervision.
- Supported by both IPDACT and Fire panels.
- Alarm panel supervises in Fire scenarios.
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Teldat IP Basics- Communication Highlights: ARLY
Internet
ARLY protocol
• ARLY is the protocol used between the
mIP/IPDACT and the VisorALARM
• Three services run on ARLY
Alarm Transmission
Account Supervision
Upload / Download
• Saves bandwidth in the ARC’s IP service
- ARLY runs over UDP/IP  Less bandwidth consuming than TCP/IP solutions
• Reliable communications:
- ARLY adds robustness to UDP with packet sequencing and retransmissions
- Backup VisorALARM serves mIP/IPDACT’s if the Main VisorALARM is down
• Firewall friendly
- The Security Service just requires one open port in the ARC access Firewalls
- No open ports required in the customer’s Firewall
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The IP packet format & NAPT
IP SOURCE ADDRESS
IP
packet
IP DESTINATION ADDRESS
UDP SOURCE PORT
UDP DESTINATION PORT
ARLY PROTOCOL PAYLOAD
NAPT
Encapsulated
UDP packet
The IP packet sent by the IPDACT has private source IP address and source
UDP port
When the IP packet traverses the customer access router, on its way to the
Internet, the source IP address and UDP port is translated to public ones.
When the IP packet traverses the customer access router, on its way to the IPDACT
(opposite direction), inverse translation takes place: destination public IP address &
port is translated to the private ones.
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Scenario 1: IPDACT and VisorALARM behind a NAPT router
•In a typical scenario, the IPDACT and VisorALARM default
gateways are connected to the Internet.
•UDP frames transmitted to the Internet through these
gateways are hence modified according to NAPT (Network
Address Port Translation).
•The following diagram illustrates a network diagram for this
scenario as well as the UDP frame header parameters in
each network segment (subscriber network, the Internet and
the ARC network):
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IPDACT and VisorALARM behind a NAPT router
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IPDACT and VisorALARM behind a NAPT router
•As shown in the drawing, both routers need to do NAPT so
the transmitted UDP frame travels along the Internet with
the system public IP addresses (213.4.21.187 and
80.26.96.183 in the Figure). For the correct system operation,
the subscriber’s network firewall should allow:
- UDP traffic sent from the IPDACT (IP address: 192.168.1.2 in the
example) to the ARC public IP address (80.26.96.183 in the example).
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IPDACT and VisorALARM behind a NAPT router
•On transmission, the subscriber’s default gateway sets a
NAPT conversion entry in its cache memory, so the received
UDP traffic from the Internet can be forwarded back to the
IPDACT.
- UDP traffic received from the ARC (80.26.96.183). The subscriber’s
default gateway will forward this traffic to the IPDACT (192.168.1.2)
according to its cached NAPT entry.
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IPDACT and VisorALARM behind a NAPT router
•In analogy, the ARC network firewall should allow:
- UDP traffic received from the Internet to its serving port (port 80 in the
example). Traffic to this port should be triggered to the VisorALARM
(IP address: 172.24.4.1, serving port 80).
- UDP traffic sent from the VisorALARM to the Internet
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Teldat IP Basics -IPDACT Security
•Highest security level in the industry:
- All IP traffic exchanged is encrypted with a 512-bit AES algorithm
(Grade AA for UL1610).
- The configuration access is password protected.
•IPDACT installer & configuration passwords can be centrally
managed.
•Any IPDACT parameter can be managed from the central
station via individual IP address or group config pattern.
•Anti-device substitution protection based on non-writable
IPDACT specific information.
•Anti-replay protection to avoid man-in-the-middle attacks
- ‘sequential marked’ frames.
© Martello Consulting, 2009
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Teldat IP Basics -Supervision
•Firewall compatibility:
- All communication begins at the IPDACT side so it becomes a trusted
host behind the customer’s firewall.
- The IPDACT to VisorALARM communication only requires one UDP
port.
•Low UDP bandwidth vs TCP/IP:
- Contact frame (once, when IPDACT boots up)  72 bytes
 Polling frames  24 bytes
 Alarm frames  56 bytes
•IP comm. supervision.
•PSTN supervision.
- Supported by both IPDACT and Fire panels.
- Alarm panel supervises in Fire scenarios.
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Part III: Servicing Receiver Customers
•Recommended Tools
•IPDACT programming
•Reducing Customer Frustration
•Initial Bench Receiver Settings
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Recommended Tools For Tech Support Site
• TeraTerm-Pro Shareware but better terminal program than
HyperTerminal which does not come with Vista or Windows 7.
- Used for programming:
 IPDACT via Telnet or serial connection
 VisorALARM Plus via Telnet or serial connection
• IPDACT Windows Programming Tool
- Used for programming IPDACT in field
 Actually a Windows application front end for Telnet
• VisorALARM Manager-A Windows application for Telnet
• FTP client (Available on Vista/Windows 7)
- Used for upgrading receivers
• RFU: Rabbit Field Utility
- Used for upgrading IPDACT firmware from a PC
• Ping-Used to determine access to an IP address
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Basic IP-Card Programming Requirements
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
IPDACT default access password (factory default is 24680).
This is NOT the install password
“Installator” password, required to execute the register
command. (Called “Installator” password to separate from
default access password)
If STATIC IP is to be used such as in an enterprise or
corporation: Obtain IP address, subnet mask and Internet
gateway for IPDACT from enterprise IT manager.
Default IP is 192.168.0 100 with subnet of 255.255.255.0
(Card ships defaulted to DHCP)
IPDACT account number or client number
IP addresses of the Primary and Secondary VisorALARM
central station receivers
UDP Port number to use
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IPDACT Windows Installer Tool
Automatically finds IPDACT
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IPDACT Windows Installer Tool
Automatically finds IPDACT
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IPDACT Windows Installer Tool
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Eliminate Setup Frustration
•Central Station Operators should contact tech support before
opening the box!
•Obtain or download programming tools including TeraTerm
Pro.
•Downloads:
- Download the latest version of VisorALARM Manager.
- After determining firmware version decide if receiver needs firmware
upgrade before continuing.
 This can be accomplished via the monitor program inside VM or via simple
serial terminal connection and turning it on.
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Eliminate Setup Frustration for New Customers
•If possible, set up receiver on bench before mounting in
rack
•Connect via serial cable to set basic parameters such as:
- IP address
- Gateway
- Port numbers
•After preliminary settings, system can be rack mounted and
accessed via Telnet from the programmer’s desk.
•This process will eliminate a lot of frustration!
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Tera-Term Pro setup
•Using the supplied DB9M to DB9F serial cable connect to
receiver first via serial port.
•Set Tera-Term window to 40 lines –this allows more of the
config to be seen without scrolling
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A new session of Tera-Term is defaulted to COM 1
•Connect first via the DB9 serial port on the back of the
receiver –setup is standard 9600, 8, n, 1
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Initial Settings
•Upon connection, hit enter to start the session
•Enter manager for User:
•Enter 24680 for password and the following should appear:
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Changing IP address of the receiver
•Determine existing IP address (should be 192.168.0.200)
•At the * prompt, enter p 4 (p-space-4) and the following
screen should appear:
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Changing IP address of the receiver
•At the Config> prompt, type “show all” and the following
screen will scroll to the bottom of the config file: (exit) Note
the IP address below:
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Changing IP address of the receiver
•At the Config> prompt, Enter the following commands,
protocol ip
•The receiver will respond with the following prompt:
•IP config>
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Changing IP address of the receiver
• Type the following text to change the IP address
• IP Config>address Ethernet 0/0 XXX.XXX.XXX.XXX (spc) 255.255.0.0 or
what ever the mask to be used.
• Keep in mind the mask works in conjunction with the network numbers
to limit the number of machines that can exist on the network or to
divide subnets to prevent machines from accessing other machines.
• Once this is complete, the user can connect with VisorALARM Manager.
This will make the setup go much faster and cause less frustration.
• To exit from IPCONFIG, type exit to return to Config>
• Save the configuration by type sa (save)
• Respond to “save configuration? –type y (yes)
• Then type <CtrL>P to exit to the * prompt
• Type re for restart to start the receiver with the changed IP address.
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Part IV VisorALARM Manager
•Logging In
•Set Global Parameters
•The Monitor Program
- Determining Firmware Rev and Bios Rev
- Determining mIP on-line/off line-status
•Adjusting User-Defined Contact ID Codes
•Viewing Registered Accounts
•Setting up Configuration Patterns
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VisorALARM Manager Initial Setup
•VisorALARM Manager is actually a Visual Basic front end to
Telnet.
•If the actual IP address is not entered correctly, the session
will not start.
•Enter does not work-click on OK with the mouse.
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VisorALARM Manager Initial Setup
•Enter Username and Password (defaults are manager,
24680)
•Click OK
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Successful Retrieval
Global Tab
Retrieve Config
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Start Monitor
Global Parameters
Set all IP addresses for receiver, router/gateway, and NTP host
Set IP address of unit on network used to supervise the network (IP
address to monitor) This should be a machine that is on 24/7.
Set parameters of automation software emulation
Set User Name and password
Set TCP upload/download parameters
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Monitor Program
To open the monitor program, click the icon with the
lightning bolt in the upper right hand corner of VA
Manager
The first tab shows license and version numbers as
well as a virtual representation of receiver front panel
LED condition.
The second tab will show all registered remote IP
communicators including IP address, software version
number and status, (alive, contacted, loss reported.)
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Monitor Program
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mIP Status Screen
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User-Defined Contact ID Codes
Change to 311
Battery Fault
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User-Defined Codes
Here you can change some contact ID codes that report to
automation
Note that the alarm reported from input number 1 on the
mIP/IPDACT communicator should be changed to 311 “battery
missing/trouble”
• This is used to monitor aux power supplies when connecting to a non-UL listed
fire panel.
Note that some codes do not restore.
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Registered Accounts
Req. for UD
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Registered Accounts
This screen shows all registered accounts
Accounts can be deleted from the system on this screen
For upload/download, the central station operator must fill in the
subscriber telephone number provided by the installer/dealer.
Other parameters can be changed and updated or pushed out to
the remote communicator.
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Config Patterns
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Config Patters
Here you control the registration process of remote communicators
When an installer registers a remote card to the receiver, the receiver
overwrites the flash memory of the remote communicator with
information from the assigned pattern
The pattern ID is the key database index to a set of remote
communicators but it is also the public side of the encryption key.
• Note that most central station pick one general configuration pattern. However, if a
customer uses a maintenance receiver (such as a county school system) to receive trouble
alarms, then it is critical that a separate configuration pattern be used for that specific
customer.
• Download the document called Understanding Configuration Patterns from
www.martelloconsulting.com for more understanding.
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Part V-Fine Tuning via CONFIG
•All commands administered via VisorALARM manager plus
additional configurations can be administered via direct
command line interface (CLI)
•Requires use of a terminal program such as TeraTerm.Pro or
Hyperterminal. Hyperterminal no longer ships with Vista or
Windows 7. TeraTerm works on both operating systems and
is shareware.
•TeraTerm Pro can be used initially via the serial port to set
up the basic IP address. Note that early versions of
VisorALARM Manger GUI will not permit removal of default
address.
•Once setup, the user can connect remotely via Telnet over
IP.
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VisorALARM console terminal access
•Authenticated access.
- The console is a command line interface (CLI)  text mode.
- The console structure is always the same (local and remote).
•PC Serial Port to VisorALARM connection:
- Standard DB9 cable from the PC COM to the VisorALARM AUX port.
- TeraTerm serial port (COM):
- Speed: 9600 bps.
- Data bits: 8.
- Parity: None.
COM
- Stop bits: 1.
- Flow control: None.
~
AC INPUT
100-240 V~;1-0.5 A
47-63 Hz
SLOT 1
WAN 1
Computer
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AUX.
To prevent electric shock,
CAUTION!do not remove cover.
VisorALARM console remote terminal access
•Telnet connection to the VisorALARM IP address:
•Firewall compatibility:
- The telnet is a TCP connection to the VisorALARM port 23.
- We can set a different port.
IP1
IP
telnet
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VisorALARM console terminal layout
Serial Num.
Main Process (P 1)
Firmware
release
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Console processes
Console access
*config
Cntrl-P
Main
process
*
Configuration
Config >
Cntrl-P
*monitor
*P 3
*event
Cntrl-P
Event
Visualization
*P 2
*P 4
Monitoring
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Main process commands (P 1)
*LOAD ?
ACTIVATE
DEACTIVATE
IMMEDIATE
RACTIVATE
RDEACTIVATE
Interactive help command
*?
MONITOR
CONFIG
RUNNING-CONFIG
FLUSH
INTERCEPT
LOAD
LOGOUT
PROCESS
RESTART
STATUS
TELNET
VRF-TELNET
*LOGOUT
Do you wish to end connection (Yes/No)?
*RESTART
Are you sure to restart the system(Yes/No)? Y
Restarting. Please wait .......................................
APP DATA DUMP......................................
Running application
Flash configuration read
Initializing
*TELNET 192.168.0.100
Trying to connect...
(Press Control S to come back to local router)
Telnet connection closed.
*TELNET
Telnet destination [192.168.0.100]?
Telnet source [192.6.2.176]?
Telnet port [23]?
Trying to connect...
(Press Control S to come back to local router)
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Configuration process (P 4)
•Where all the VisorALARM configuration commands are
present.
•Hierarchic tree structure: Configuration sub-processes.
•In order to activate a new configuration:
- Execute the required configuration commands.
- Exit the configuration sub process ([subprocess] config>exit)
- Save the configuration (Config>save-yes).
- Quit P 4 (Ctrl+P) and restart the VisorALARM (* restart)
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Useful console configuration commands (I)
•Add a new user/password with different console passwords
- Config> user <name> password <pwd>
- Config> user <name> access-level <acc_level>
•To erase an existing user/password insert a no before the
command
- Config>no user<name> password >pwd>
•To show the entire configuration:
- Config>Show Config
•To delete the entire configuration
- Config>no configuration
•To delete a single item
- Config>no <item> as in Config>no mip 1234
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Useful console configuration commands (I)
•To configure IP address
- Config>protocol IP (To exit type quit)
•ARLY configuration access
-p4
- List devices returns the following:
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Useful console configuration commands (II)
• To access the ARLY directly:
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A complete VisorALARM configuration (III)
• The VisorALARM configuration process is divided into the
following groups:
1. Serial connection with the automation software (in the ARLY
interface)
2. IP configuration (in protocol IP)
3. Alarm reception interface (in the ARLY interface)
4. Receiver protocol type
1. Receiver ID & line ID
5. Connectivity parameters (in the ARLY interface)
1. UDP port
2. External reference IP address
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A complete VisorALARM configuration (III)
6. Backup receiver information (in the ARLY interface)
7. User configurable events (in the ARLY interface)
1. IPDACT patterns (in the ARLY interface)
8. Advanced configuration:
1. NTP configuration for the clock synchronization in backup
scenarios.
2. SEPI serial interface configuration for the serial printer.
9. TVRP configuration for local redundancy scenarios.
10.Trace and event activation (in the event configuration sub-process).
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A complete VisorALARM configuration (III)
•As a rule, the easiest way to configure a VisorALARM receiver
is using Teldat’s customized “configuration scripts”.
•To configure the VisorALARM with a script:
- Connect to the console via Telnet or Serial connection.
- Type “p 4” and hit ENTER to log into the “Config>” prompt.
- Select all the configuration script content and save it using notepad as
a basic txt file.
- Edit the saved text file with any new information.
- From your saved file and paste it in the “Config>” prompt.
- Save the configuration and restart the VisorALARM.
- In the new bootup, the configuration is activated.
- NOTE: newer formatted mIPS require the line does not wrap prior to
pasting back into the config.
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VisorALARM configuration script template (III)
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VisorALARM configuration script template (III)
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