STAAR_Writing_HS__persuasive

Report
STAAR-Light * STAAR WRITE
Persuasive Text
Kaye Price-Hawkins
Priceless Literacy
www.pricelessliteracy.homestead.com
[email protected]
Instructional
Focus
http://dese.mo.gov/divimprove/sia/msip/DOK_Chart.pdf
PERSUASIVE WRITING:

Persuasive texts include:
– A position on a narrow topic
– An exploration of both sides of the issue
– Strong evidence for the side you choose
Facts and relevant examples
 Logical reasoning
 Testimonials from believable experts

– Convincing language
Out of this World Plan-It
Pack-It for Persuasive
Outside flaps of the sentence strip:
Inside the sentence strip:
INTRODUCTION
“HOOK” your
reader:
 Interesting
statement/fac
t
 Grab reader’s
attention
THESIS (controlling
idea):
 Includes
focus of the
“Write about”
prompt and
what you
intend to
prove.
BODY
SUPPORT YOUR THESIS BY:
•
Well-developed ideas – connected with
appropriate transitions
•
Specific, strong relevant examples or
anecdotes
•
Your point of view contrasted with the
opposition and stated reasons why your
POV is the better choice.
•
Topic-specific evidence (proof):
•
Ethos—credibility of the writer or the
sources (writer)
•
Pathos—emotion, sympathy, beliefs and
values (audience)
•
Logos—reasonable statement and
presentation of the argument (text)
CONCLUSION
 End the paper with
something for the reader
to think about.
 Restate your position
and why that is THE way
to think on this topic.
 Avoid repeating it word
for word.
Inside Center:


Important information
about persuasive writing
for the STAAR.
Possibilities for how a writer might
organize and support persuasive
writing.
Inside right flap—top
STAAR Rubric
Jury’s Verdict:
The Sentencing!
Each grade level tested will have an
appropriate rubric which you may
want to “reword” with your students
so that the rubric reflects what the
STAAR is saying but morphed into
kid-friendly language.

Organization/Progression

Development of Ideas

Use of Language/Conventions
Inside—right flap:
BOTTOM (pocket with card):
– Revising questions on one side
– Editing questions on the other side
●
Questions to check your own
paper or to ask about a peer’s paper.
Model first with the large group.
●
May be used in small groups or individually
Glue the Envelope onto the back of the folder..
Now, glue the
reading questions
on the left, leaving
room on the right
for academic
language graffiti.
Envelope is for persuasive mentor
texts and assignments.
Reading Questions

Types of questions
– Inference
– Text specific (features, purpose)
– Evidence based
– Author’s craft (word choice,
literary devices, vocabulary)
– Summary
Mentor Text for Discovery


Read a piece of persuasive text with the
students.
Examine the text by looking at the author’s
craft, development and support
–
–
–
–
Convincing language (argument/transitions)
Facts and relevant examples
Quotations/believable experts
Logical reasoning
Foldable for Analysis of Support
in a Persuasive Essay
HEADING FOR THE PAPER




Facts/Relevant
Quotations/Believable
Facts/relevant
examples (ethos)
experts (ethos)
examples
Quotations/Believable
Problem
experts
Question
And
Logical
Position
Argument/
Solution
Logical reasoning
Reasoning (logos)
Convincing language
(pathos)
Argument/convincing
language
On the Back: Top: Introduction/Conclusion. Other support and
questions may be placed in the boxes on the back as well as meaningful
transitional words/phrases. Diamond: positive/negative words.
STAAR 2011 Sample Prompt for Persuasive
Read the information in the box below.
Some argue that our so-called information age is really
an “interruption age.” With smart phones in hand, we
spend much of the day texting, tweeting, and surfing
the Web. Rather than concentrating on big issues, we
fill our heads with the trivia and gossip that interrupts
our attention. So much information passes our way that
we have trouble remembering any of it.
Do you believe that instant communication is helping or
hurting us? Think carefully about this question.
Persuasive sample, continued
Write an essay stating your position on whether you
believe that we live in an information age or an
interruption age.
Be sure to—
state your position clearly
use appropriate organization
provide specific support for your argument
choose your words carefully
edit your writing for grammar, mechanics, and spelling
What do you notice about the
prompt wording?


Write an essay stating your position on
whether you believe that we live in an
information age or an interruption age.
Persuasive? Yes… Why? Key word?
Write an essay explaining whether
people should be more concerned
about others than about themselves.
Expository? Yes…Why? Key word?
Your Turn…

Look at the pages of suggestions for
persuasive and choose one.
– You might consider a topic that would
connect to the mentor text.
– Find a quote in the mentor text that
would serve as your boxed information.

Use the example in your packet and
compose a STAAR prompt model.
Test-taking Strategies

Circle the “write” statement and underline
important key words.

Use space for planning the essay
– Graphic organizer that works
– Decide on direction and focus of the paper

Rough Draft...
– Introduction (one to three sentences)
– Main focus (with details—well-developed section of
the paper—may be one or two paragraphs)
– Conclusion (one to three sentences)
COUNT LINES ON YOUR ROUGH DRAFT
IF YOU ARE OVER 26 LINES,
Read to decide what might not be the best
information to include.
REVISE………
IF YOU ARE UNDER 26 LINES,
Read carefully to see if you need to add
information or change the wording
•
•
transitional statements
specific details

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