It*s All Too Much - Global Information and Telecommunication

Report
Catching Up With The Global
Bandwidth Demand: 2023 And
Beyond
Filippos BALASIS
TANAKA LAB
2013. 10.2
Outline
2
1
• Global Internet Traffic Forecast
2
• Future Services and Applications
3
• Transmission Speed Forecast & Records
4
• Novel Photonic Technologies
5
• Architecture of Future Optical Networks
6
• Conclusion
Global Internet Traffic Forecast
3
Global Internet Traffic in 2023
Year
Global Internet Traffic
1992 100 Gigabytes per Day
1997 100 Gigabytes per Hour
2002 100 Gigabytes per Second
2007 2000 Gigabytes per Second
2012 12000 Gigabytes per Second
2017 35000 Gigabytes per Second
4
2023 >70000 Gigabytes per Second
Bandwidth Hungry Services &
Applications (1/3)
More and more users will rely on cloud computing for:
5
1.
Storage
2.
Gaming
3.
Sheer computation power
Bandwidth Hungry Services &
Applications (2/3)
All multimedia content distributed through Internet (audio,
video, gaming etc) will surpass standard HD resolution
(1080p). NHK is already discussing 16K signal broadcasting
for Tokyo Olympics 2020.
6
Bandwidth Hungry Services &
Applications (3/3)
In 10 years it is almost certain that new innovative
applications and services will surface that will boost the
Internet traffic and burden the network infrastructure even
more.
7
Forecast of Broadband Speed by
Region
2011
Global
11
Asia Pacific
11
Latin America
4
North America
13
Western Europe
13
Central and Eastern Europe 13
Middle East and Africa
4
8
2012
15
14
6
16
17
16
4
2013
19
19
7
20
21
20
5
2014
25
25
9
25
28
26
6
2015
32
33
11
31
36
32
7
2016
39
41
13
38
43
40
8
2023 CAGR
220
28%
271
31%
49
21%
171
24%
229
27%
191
25%
24
17%
Trend of Connectivity
9
Internet Traffic from Wireless and Mobile Devices Will Surpass
the Volume of Traffic from Wired Devices by 2017.
Today’s Speed Records
 Mobile Data: 10Gbps (Tokyo Institute of Technology and
NTT Docomo – December of 2012)
 Fixed Wireless Transmission (with free-space optics) :
40Gbps up to 1 km (Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid
State Physics & Karlsruhe Institute for Technology – May of
2013)
 Wired Transmission: i) 31Tbps (155x200Gbps) over 7,200
km fibre cable (Alcatel-Lucent – July of 2013)
ii) 1Pbps (12x222x380Gbps) over 52 km fibre cable (NTT –
September of 2012)
10
Optical Fibre Transmission – Is it
Enough?
11
Optical fibre networks will undoubtedly be the
cornerstone for future telecommunications but the
global Internet traffic in ten years from now will exhaust
the current bandwidth resources.
We need more advanced transmission technology as
well as a more efficient architecture.
Novel Technologies in Transmission
 New types of fibre (eg. multicore fibre)
 New modulation formats (OFDM, high-order phase
modulation)
 Twisted light transmission
12
Future Optical Photonic Devices
 All-optical 3R regenerators
 Wavelength converters
 Optical buffers and circuits for routing and switching in the
optical layer
13
From Static to Dynamic Optical
Network
 Static Case: Each fibre link
supports connections (lightpaths)
with stable data rate that remain
active the whole time.
 Dynamic Case: Each connection
(lightpath) can be dynamically setup with varying data rate and
duration
14
Elastic and Cognitive Optical Networks
 An elastic optical network provides flexible bandwidth
allocation that depends on the clients’ demands.
 A cognitive optical network is a network with a process that
can process its current conditions, and then plan, decide, and
act on those conditions. The network can learn from these
adaptations and use them to make future decisions, all while
taking into account quality of transmission (QoT) and quality
of service (QoS) constraints.
15
Goal of my Research
Propose novel techniques for flexible and dynamically
reconfigurable optical networks that should address the
following issues:
1. How to route new traffic demands? By existing optical
connections (lightpaths) or by reconfiguring the virtual
topology (i.e., by rearranging existing connections)?
2. How to assign resources? Not only wavelengths or
spectrum,
but
also
the
most
appropriate
transmission/switching technique, modulation format, bitrate, etc.
3. How to ensure energy-efficient operation?
16
Conclusion
 Despite the trend of every of every communication service offered
to the end user becoming wireless, eventually all the Internet traffic
will still be forwarded and carried through the backbone optical
networks.
 For the future optical networks besides the advancements in optical
transmissions and photonic devices we also need new architectures
that will provide more efficient usage of the resources.
17
Thank you for your
attention!
18

similar documents