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Report
Emergency Support
Function (ESF) #10
Oil and Hazardous Materials
Response Annex to the
National Response
Framework
May 2014
U.S. EPA Office of Emergency Management
What we will cover
• What work does ESF #10 do?
– Scope of ESF #10 work and related support
– Natural disasters
– Chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear (CBRN) incidents
• How is ESF #10 organized to accomplish its work?
– Primary agency designation
– Response organization – field and HQ
– Special teams and equipment assets
• How is ESF #10 work funded?
– FEMA/EPA funding agreement
Scope of ESF #10
work and related
support
Scope of ESF #10 Work
General
• Respond to oil and hazardous materials (hazmat) releases to the
environment:
– Assess and detect
– Prevent, mitigate, minimize
– Contain and stabilize
– Collect, manage, and dispose
– Clean up/decontaminate
environment, structures, buildings
• Develop site safety plan for oil/hazmat site
• ESF #10 doesn’t transition to a National Disaster Recovery
Framework (NDRF) Recovery Support Function (RSF)
Scope of ESF #10 Work
Natural Disasters
• Assess extent of spills/contamination
– Aerial asset and mobile labs available (more on this
later)
– Soil, sediment, air, water monitoring/sampling
• Respond to oil/hazmat spills and threats of spills
• Remove oil/hazmat from impacted vessels
• Collect/dispose “orphaned” containers (e.g.,
drums, tanks, cylinders) from impact area and
debris piles
Scope of ESF #10 Work
Natural Disasters
• Collect/manage
household hazardous
waste
• Collect/manage freon
from white goods
• Note: ESF #3/USACE may also
conduct certain hazmat-related
activities when managing
natural disaster debris
Scope of ESF #10 Work
Natural Disasters
• Debris support to USACE/states – ESF #10 or ESF
#3 subtask
– Air monitoring of debris operations/landfills
– Landfill monitors to assure compliance with
environmental requirements
– Technical advice to USACE/states/locals on proper
debris management/disposal
– Review USACE/state/local debris management plans
– Check debris piles for oil/hazmat contamination
Scope of ESF #10 Work
Natural Disasters
A word about animal carcasses:
• ESF #3/USACE:
– “Debris may also include livestock or poultry
carcasses”
• ESF #11/USACE Support Agency:
– “Debris to include…animal carcasses”
• Upcoming Response FIOP:
– ESF #10 lead for oil/hazmat-contaminated carcasses
(not typical in natural disasters)
Scope of ESF #10 Work
Natural Disasters
Other items to note:
• ESF #10 doesn’t include
collection/management of firearms
• Another key EPA role is water
infrastructure support
– Covered under ESF #3 for natural
disasters
Scope of ESF #10 Work
CBRN Incidents
• Assess/determine extent of contamination
– Aerial asset and mobile labs available (more later)
– Soil, sediment, air, water, structure, building
monitoring/sampling
– Real-time environmental monitoring
– Sampling and laboratory analysis
– Note: Laboratory capacity to analyze samples may
become a critical factor
Scope of ESF #10 Work
CBRN Incidents
• Contain/stabilize contamination as possible
• Develop and implement appropriate cleanup
– Removal/excavation, decontamination, etc.
• Manage wastes
• Coordinate with ESF #8 on risk to public health
– Potential need to also coordinate with ESF #8 to track off-site
contamination to ID individuals needing medical attention by
ESF #8 and areas needing environmental cleanup by ESF #10
• Note: Public decontamination and contaminated fatality
management not within ESF #10 scope
– ESF #10 decons environment/buildings/structures/cars, not
general public or contaminated fatalities
Scope of ESF #10 Work
CBRN Incidents
• ESF #10 expects to need to increase its
coordination with JFO UCG and other
ESFs/RSFs for CBRN incidents:
– ESF #10 information on type and extent of
contamination may be needed for many tasks, e.g.:
•
•
•
•
Identify safe ingress/egress routes for public/responders
Identify need for evacuations and relocations
Support safety for S&R and other on-site teams
Identify areas where support facilities may be located
Scope of ESF #10 Work
CBRN Incidents
• ESF #10 information on status of
environmental/structural cleanup efforts will
be needed by other ESFs/RSFs conducting
short- and long-term recovery activities, e.g.:
– Status of decontamination/cleanup of critical
infrastructure
– Status of decontamination/cleanup of other
residential, business, and government areas
Scope of ESF #10 Work
CBRN Incidents
EPA/USACE/FEMA Contaminated Debris
MOU (2010)
• CBRN blast/explosion incidents create debris
field
– Is it “debris” (ESF #3) or is it “hazmat” (ESF #10)??
• MOU clarifies ESF #3 and #10 roles
• CBRN contamination from non-blast/explosion
scenarios led by ESF #10 and outside MOU
scope
Scope of ESF #10 Work
CBRN Incidents
Contaminated Debris MOU (cont)
• ESF #3 Lead Responsibilities – in coordination
with ESF #10:
– Emergency phase debris clearance
– Assessment of structural instability and stabilization of
structures
– Building demolition
Scope of ESF #10 Work
CBRN Incidents
Contaminated Debris MOU (cont)
• ESF #10 Lead Responsibilities:
– Minimize/stabilize release
– Detect/assess contamination
– Analyze/implement options for environmental and
structural cleanup (including management of debris
remaining after emergency phase)
– Manage waste
Scope of ESF #10 Work
Nuc/Rad Incidents
Nuclear/Radiological Incident Annex
• Identifies specialized federal interagency teams
that may be activated:
– Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment
Center (FRMAC)
– Advisory Team for Environment, Food, and Health
(Advisory Team)
– Nuclear Incident Response Team (NIRT)
Scope of ESF #10 Work
Nuc/Rad Incidents
FRMAC
• Mission: Coordination of environmental radiological
monitoring, sampling, assessment (not cleanup!)
• Includes several federal agencies
• DOE leads initially, transitions to EPA for site cleanup
• EPA deploys its FRMAC assets under ESF #10
– DOE deploys its FRMAC assets under ESF #12
• Close coordination and integration of FRMAC and ESF
#10 UC functions critical for common operating picture of
radiological and other hazmat releases
Scope of ESF #10 Work
Nuc/Rad Incidents
Advisory Team
• EPA provides representative under ESF #10
NIRT
• Established by Homeland Security Act
• Gives DHS authority to decide to activate and manage
certain DOE and EPA radiological response assets
• EPA expects to deploy its NIRT assets through ESF #10
MA process when NIRT activated
Scope of ESF #10 Work
Worker S&H for Natural Disasters and CBRN
• NRF Worker S&H Support Annex led by OSHA
– Coordinates federal support for worker S&H management
activities
– Addresses broader worker S&H issues for entire response, e.g.,
physical hazards, heat exhaustion
– Also includes advising on oil/hazmat issues
– EPA/USCG are support agencies
• ESF #10 develops a worker S&H plan for its oil/hazmat
response area
– Coordinates with Worker S&H Support Annex as needed
– OSHA also a support agency under ESF #10
Scope of ESF #10 Work
General
• ESF #10 has Pre-Scripted Mission Assignments
(PSMAs) that can be tailored to incident
• Developed more for natural disasters
• No CBRN-specific PSMAs yet
ESF #10 Response
Organization
ESF #10 Response Organization
Overview
Coordinating Agency
EPA
Primary Agencies
EPA
USCG
Support Agencies
USDA
DOC
DOD
DOE
HHS
DHS
DOI
DOJ
DOL
DOS
DOT
GSA
NRC
ESF #10 Response Organization
Overview
ESF #10 Leadership
Inland zone
EPA primary
agency
Coastal zone
(including Great Lakes)
USCG primary
agency
Actions affecting both
inland and coastal
zones
EPA primary/
USCG deputy
ESF #10 Response Organization
Overview
• ESF #10 uses the response structure and coordinating
mechanisms that were established under the National
Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency
Plan
• Commonly known as National Contingency Plan or NCP
• A regulation that implements oil/hazmat planning and
response authorities of 2 laws:
– Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and
Liability Act (CERCLA or Superfund)
– Clean Water Act/Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (CWA/OPA)
ESF #10 Response Organization
Key Components
ESF #10 On-Scene Incident
Commanders (ICs):
• EPA/USCG Federal On-Scene
Coordinators (OSCs)
ESF #10 Coordination Structures:
• 13 Regional Response Teams
• National Response Team
• EPA Regional/USCG District
EOCs
• EPA HQ/USCG HQ EOCs
Other On-Scene and Reachback
Support for ESF #10 ICs:
• Special Teams
• Federal IMAT personnel
• Federal contractors
EPA/USCG ESF #10
Response Coordination
ESF #10 Response Organization
EPA Regions & Special Teams
10*
10
10*
10*
1
5*
5*
5
9
9
8
5* 2
7
1
7
7*
3*
3*
4*
4
4
6
2
4
2*
National Enforcement
Investigations Center
Denver, CO
* denotes field office
CBRN CMAD
EPA Headquarters
Washington, DC
2
1
3*
3
3
Regional Offices and
Field Offices
1 Boston, MA
2 New York, NY
2* Puerto Rico
3* Allentown, PA
3 Philadelphia, PA
3* Wheeling, WV
3* Richmond, VA
4 Atlanta, GA
4* Tampa, FL
4 Raleigh, NC
4 Louisville, KY
5 Chicago, IL
5* Charlesville, IL
5* Cincinnati, OH
5* Cleveland, OH
5* Grosse Ile, MI
6 Dallas, TX
7 Kansas City, MO
7* St. Louis, MO
8 Denver, CO
9 San Francisco, CA
9* Los Angeles, CA
10* Seattle, WA
10* Portland, OR
10* Boise, ID
Anchorage, AK
Radiation Labs
1. Las Vegas, NV
2, Montgomery, AL
Environmental
Response Team
1 Edison, NJ
2 Cincinnati, OH
3 Las Vegas, NV
ESF #10 Response Organization
USCG Districts and Strike Teams
NST
Locations
NSFCC
Location
ESF #10 Response Organization
On-Scene Components
EPA/USCG Federal OSCs = ESF #10 Incident
Commanders
• ~240 EPA OSCs and ~35 USCG OSCs with experience
and delegated authority to manage incidents
• OSCs have extensive working relationships with federal,
state, and local responders
• ESF #10 UC also staffed by:
– Other trained EPA/USCG and support agency IMAT personnel
– Federal contractors
– Special teams
ESF #10 Response Organization
Special Teams
EPA - Environmental Response Team (ERT)
EPA - Radiological Emergency Response Team
(RERT)
EPA – National Criminal Enforcement Response
Team (NCERT)
EPA - CBRN Consequence Management
Advisory Division (CMAD)
USCG - National Strike Force (NSF)
USCG - Incident Management Assistance
Team (IMAT)
USCG - Public Information Assist Team (PIAT)
OSHA – Specialized Response Teams
NOAA & EPA - Scientific Support Coordinators
(SSCs)
Navy SUPSALV
Other teams
ESF #10 Response Organization
Special Teams: EPA’s Environmental
Response Team (ERT)
• Focus: “Classic Environmental” Emergencies
–
–
–
–
–
Sampling/Monitoring
Characterization
Hazard Evaluation
Risk Assessment/Safety
Decontamination/Disposal
• 33 experienced responders/50+ trained contractors
• Key Assets include TAGAs, mobile labs, Dive Team,
Specialized Rad Gear, Info Management Platforms
32
ESF #10 Response Organization
Special Teams: EPA’s Radiological
Emergency Response Team (RERT)
• May deploy on own to support FRMAC
• 27 person forward team (All Feds/No Contractor Support)
• Focus: Radiation Monitoring and Evaluation
– Sampling/Monitoring
– Hazard Evaluation
– Planning Decontamination
– Risk Assessment
– Lab Analysis
– Characterization
– Clean up
– Waste Disposal
• Key Assets include RadNet System,
MERL, Scanner Vans, deployables
33
ESF #10 Response Organization
Special Teams: EPA’s National Criminal
Enforcement Response Team (NCERT)
• 30 special agents and law enforcement
specialists stationed around the United States
• Liaison between OSC and FBI; also supports
ESF #13 for EPA
• Focus: Forensic Evidence Collection and
EPA Protective Escorts
– Level-A through D Capabilities
– All-Hazards
– Force Protection with Firearms
34
ESF #10 Response Organization
Special Teams: EPA’s CBRN Consequence
Management Advisory Division (CMAD)
Mission: Provides scientific and
technical expertise for all phases of
CBRN environmental consequence
management
Focus: Operational preparedness for
CBRN agents. Maintain ASPECT
aircraft and PHILIS labs.
Support: All phases of CBRN environmental response,
including characterization, decontamination, clearance and
waste management
Buildings, infrastructure, indoor and outdoor environments, transportation sectors
Airborne Spectral Photometric
Environmental Collection Technology
ASPECT Program
-Remote-Sensing & ImageryChemical, Radiological & Situational Awareness
NATION’S ONLY!
ESF #10 Response Organization
ASPECT: Operational Concept
•
•
•
•
Provide a readiness level on a 24/7 basis
Provide a simple, one phone call activation of the aircraft
Wheels up in under 1 hour from the time of activation
Once onsite and data is collected it takes about….
~ 5 minutes to process and turn around data to first responders
• Deployment Simplified:
• Once on-scene, collect chemical, radiological, or situational data (imagery)
using established collection procedures
• Process all data within the aircraft using tested automated algorithms
• Extract the near real time data from the aircraft using a broadband satellite
system and rapidly QA/QC the data by a dedicated scientific reachback team
• Team provides the qualified data to the first responder enabling them to make
37
informed decisions in minimal time
ESF #10 Response Organization
ASPECT: Types of Deployments
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Pre-Deployments to NSSEs/SERE (Presidential Inauguration, Rose Bowl,
Super Bowl, 9/11 Anniversary)
Hurricane Sandy
West Texas Explosion
Halliburton Lost Source
Field Exercises with NGB WMD-CSTs & DOE
Deepwater Horizon
Chem & Rad Urban Background Surveys
Program Costs
The cost per flight hour is less than
$1,300. There is no additional cost
for data processing and QA/QC
since the federal employees who
run the team are getting paid
regardless.
38
ESF #10 Response Organization
ASPECT: Multi-Hazard
Identification/Reporting Concept
Aerial Image
Chemical ID/Concentration
Radiological Map
Base Map
IR Plume Image
A single pass of the aircraft produces a data set that permits mapping, aerial
photography, Infrared imaging, chemical identification and radiological detection.
These products can be generated in under 5 minutes and transmitted to the Incident
Commander using the SatCom Link.
ESF #10 Response Organization
ASPECT: Oil Detection
RED (surface oil)
GREEN (mixed oil/water)
BLUE/CYAN (water/land/other)
Skimming
Vessel
Heavy Sheen
Thick Oil
Survey area ≈ 700m x 2100m
40
ESF #10 Response Organization
Special Teams: USCG
• National Strike Teams (NSTs)
– Atlantic
– Gulf
– Pacific
• National Strike Force Coordination Center (NSFCC)
• Incident Management Assistance Team (IMAT)
– USCG Public Information Assist Team (PIAT)
ESF #10 Response Organization
Special Teams – DoD’s Navy Supervisor
of Salvage & Diving (SUPSALV)
• Ship Salvage/Wreck
Removal
• Salvage & Ocean
Engineering/Technical
Support
• Deep Ocean Search &
Recovery
• Diving
• Waterborne Pollution
Response/Recovery
ESF #10 Response Organization
Coordination, Support, and Oversight
Components
• 13 Regional Response Teams (RRTs)
– Ten standard federal regions, plus Alaska, Oceania, and
Caribbean
– 15 federal agencies - ESF #10 primary and support agencies plus states/tribes
– Co-chaired by EPA and USCG
• National Response Team (NRT)
– 15 federal agencies - ESF #10 primary and support agencies
– EPA chairs for ESF #10 response, unless solely coastal
• Neither RRT nor NRT deploy to site
ESF #10 Response Organization
Coordination, Support, and Oversight
Components
• EPA Regions and EOCs + USCG Districts and EOCs
–
–
–
–
Coordinate deployments to RRCC/JFO and ESF #10 UCs
Oversee and support ESF #10 UCs
Coordinate with EPA/USCG HQs
Activate RRTs when needed
• EPA HQ and EOC + USCG HQ and EOC
– Coordinate deployments to NRCC
– Monitor all ESF #10 deployments, more robust activation for
more significant incidents
– Policy direction, oversight and support as appropriate
– Activate NRT when needed
ESF #10 Funding
ESF #10 Funding Agreement
FEMA Policy Number: 9523.8
• FEMA Response and
Recovery Directorate Policy
Number: 9523.8
– Aka: “Suiter-Makris
agreement”
• Funded thru CERCLA/Oil
Spill Liability Trust Fund:
– Pre-existing oil/hazmat sites
under the NCP
ESF #10 Funding Agreement
Stafford Act Funded
•
•
•
•
•
Pre-deployment teams
Orphan containers
Household hazardous waste
Technical assistance to states
Pumping contaminated water
from basements when
widespread threat to public
health
• Initial assessments to
determine if immediate H&S
threat exists
• Control/stabilization of
oil/hazmat releases to deal
with immediate public H&S
threats
• Cleanup/disposal of hazmat
necessary to mitigate
immediate public H&S threats
• Monitoring of immediate H&S
threats from debris removal
operations
ESF #10 Funding Agreement
Stafford Act
May fund thru Stafford Act
• Cleanup/removal of oil/hazmat contamination in buildings/facilities
otherwise eligible for FEMA assistance – e.g., subway
decontamination following terrorist incident
Will not fund thru Stafford Act
• Testing/assessments of soil/air/waterways for mold/contaminants to
determine long-term cleanup requirements
• Long-term remediation/restoration
• Permanent storage of hazmat
• Clean/replace equipment damaged/contaminated during long-term
cleanup
• State/local costs for long-term cleanup
Questions?

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