PODD Workshop-2014 WildCenter

Report
PRAGMATIC
ORGANIZATIONAL
DYNAMIC DISPLAY
GAYLE PORTER/CEREBRAL PALSEY
EDUCATION CENTER AUSTRALIA
Presenter Information
 Jessica Jakobe, M.A. CCC-SLP
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B.A., Sociology, University of Vermont
M.S., Communication Disorders, SUNY Plattsburgh
Have been a practicing SLP for 15 years.
For the last 7 years I have been employed by the Saranac Lake
Central School.
Prior to current position worked as pre-school and early intervention
provider, working in both center-based programs and in homes.
In 2010, attended a two day PODD conference presentation by Linda
Burkhart.
Currently use PODD with a 8 year student with Rett Syndrome.
Have also used PODD with ASD students.
OBJECTIVES
 This course will give you a brief overview of PODD.
 This course is not a training for PODD, an introductory
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course (2 day training) is highly recommended.
What is PODD and why was it developed?
Why it is an effective and important tool for children
with complex communication needs?
What types of PODD books are available?
What are some different ways PODD books can be
accessed?
Creating a PODD book
DEVELOPMENT OF PODD
 “We can never really know what a person is capable
of until we provide them with the opportunity to
learn and show us.”-Gayle Porter
 PODD was created by Gayle Porter in Melbourne,
Australia, originally created for children and adults
with cerebral palsy.
DEVELOPMENT PODD
 Linda Burkhart is an internationally known pioneer
in the field of simplified technology for children with
severe challenges. She has developed numerous
adapted switches and innovative applications for
using these devices with children. She is the author
of a number of books and software titles on topics of
assistive technology and augmentative
communication.
(http://www.spectronics.com.au/article/linda-burkhart-2)
DEVELOPMENT OF PODD
 PODD was influenced by children’s and adult’s
experiences using multi-level communication books
in their daily lives.
 PODD books were created for children who have
complex communication needs.
 PODD is a low-tech alternative augmentative book for
communication.
(PODD Communication Books, US letter paper version, 2008)
DEVELOPMENT OF PODD
 Children who are non-verbal are often asked direct
questions, with a right or wrong answer or are given
limited choices that don’t go anywhere.
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PODD creates an opportunity to initiate/carry onconversation, not just respond.
With many communication systems, vocabulary comes and
goes at the end of activities. With PODD, that vocabulary
becomes part of a larger system.
With PODD, vocabulary can be built upon. PODD builds
understanding based on patterns.
http://www.Lburkhart.com
What is PODD?
 PRAGMATIC-The ways we use language socially.
 ORGANIZATIONAL-Words and symbols arranged
organized in a systematic way.
 DYNAMIC DISPLAY-Changing pages.
What is PODD?
 PODD is a way of organizing vocabulary in a
communication book or speech generating device.
 PODD is designed to be just one resource or tool for
communication.
 PODD is not meant to replace, but rather to be used
in combination with other tools.
 PODD provides vocabulary for communication all
the time, for a variety of messages, across a range of
topics, in multiple environments.
What is PODD
 PODD books usually begin with quick words on page 1
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and pragmatic intents on page 2.
Pages are numbered for easy organization.
There is a structured way of navigating throughout the
book through a series of instructional and operational
commands.
Activity specific pages are included in the PODD,
includes a variety of vocabulary, related to one activity.
Categories: These pages are used like a dictionary, when
needed for expansion and generating novel ideas not
found on other pages. Branches to categories are found
throughout the PODD.
http://Lburkhart.com
WHAT IS PODD?
Cook Page in PODD book
Why PODD?
 PODD can have different formats depending on the
individual. It’s flexible and diverse in its format. It
can grow and increase in complexity as the child
becomes more adept at communicating.
 PODD can be used all the time. It is not just for
specific activities of forms of communication.
 PODD is used to develop both receptive and
expressive communication.
(PODD Communication Books, US letter paper version, 2008)
WHY PODD?
 It can be used to assist a person to communicate
more effectively and to assist their understanding
of other people’s spoken language. (A
communication partner points to the symbols as
they talk to the person.)
 Just as we can choose from thousands of words to
communicate, the goal of PODD is to give the child
access to a larger vocabulary.
 PODD sees great potential in all children, and by
restricting vocabulary with other communication
programs, you may not be tapping into a child’s
full potential.
(PODD Communication Books, US letter paper version, 2008)
Quick Messages
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WHY PODD?
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PODD includes
the following
communicative
intents:
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Initiate or call attention
Greet
Accept
Reject
Protest
Request objects
Share and show objects
Request information
Name
Acknowledge
Answer
Comment on action/object
Express feelings
Assert Independence
Ask questions
Share information
Relate Events
Call Attention to how things are related-similar and different
Talk about past and future
Negotiate and bargain
State opinions
Tease
Threaten
Make up Stories
(PODD Communication Books, US letter paper version,
2008)
WHY PODD?
 Examples of Communicative Intents:
 I want something
 Something’s wrong
 I’ll tell you what I think (or I like or I don’t like)
 It’s time for something
 Let’s chat
 I’m asking a question
 Let’s pretend
 I have an idea
 I’m telling you a story
Communicative
Intents
Link to
Other pages
By Number
Example of Communicative Intents
AIDED LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT-
Receptive Language
AIDED LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT
 Immersion, a teaching strategy where everyone who
is around the child with communication needs, is
using the child’s AAC system when communicating,
for communication all the time. (PODD,
Communication Books US letter paper version,
2008)
 The best way to immerse a child in language is to
have access to lots of vocabulary. Then you can take
advantage of every opportunity to talk to the person
with complex communication needs.
http://www.Lburkhart.com
AIDED LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT
 Input before output.
 Children can not be expected to know how to use
something until they are given an opportunity to learn
how to use it in natural contexts.
 Children most effectively learn to use augmentative
communication through the same methods that they
learn to use verbal communication-through modeling in
natural and functional contexts.
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Drill and practice are not as effective.
Learning in functional situations is more powerful.
 Talking to a child with his system:
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Helps the child feel good about his access method to communication.
Gives the adult a good perspective on the challenges AAC learners
face.
http://www.Lburkhart.com
AIDED LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT
 The opportunity to be truly immersed in an
environment using aided language is rare. Children
learning to use aided symbols frequently experience
a significant discrepancy between the language used
by others in their environment (speech) and the
language they are expected to use.
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(PODD Communication Books US letter paper version, 2008)
AIDED LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT
 “All children require the creation of an aided language
learning environment with interaction use of a child’s
AAC system by others in their daily environment.”
(PODD Communication Books, US letter paper version,
2008)
 The use of a PODD communication book in a child’s daily
life facilitates communication interaction and
development.
 There are no pre-requisites for using PODD receptively.
(PODD Communication Books, US letter paper version, 2008)
Tips for using PODD for receptive input
 Make sure the PODD is always with the child.
 Always start on page 1 and follow the numbered links.
 Don’t be intimidated by size of the book. You only go to
pages that you need, by following the links.
 Use the system to “talk” to the child in normal everyday
contexts.
 Start with quick word page
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Then use to give opinions
Use the book whenever transitioning
 Practice when you alone.
 It’s ok to make mistakes, use as a teachable moment.
Always an “oops” on side panel.
(http://www/Lburkart.com)
EXPRESSION- ACCESSING PODD
 Direct Access-This type of PODD is designed for
children with communication needs who can directly
point to the symbols using their hand, a finger or a
tool.
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It is recommended that the communication partner turn the
pages and the child simply point to the pictures. This
eliminates communication breakdown and makes it a quicker
process. Children can become distracted by other interesting
pictures and point to words that were not really part of their
original message.
PODD Communication Books, introductory workshop manual, 2009)
ACCESS
 “Smart Partner” vs. Technology: Because the partner is
human as opposed to a computer, she can be smarter
than the computer. Communication partners can :
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Read subtle non-verbal cues and adjust the interaction as needed.
Interpret movement-recognize intent and ignore associated
reactions.
Alter timing according to the child’s reaction.
Focus on developing language and communication skills separately
from motor skills.
Accuracy of motor skills is not as crucial for success.
(Linda J. Burkhart, Partner Assisted Communication with PODD)
https://www.youtube
.com/watch?v=w3mG
S4qAjMY
DIRECT ACCESS
https://www.yo
utube.com/watc
h?v=ux1KIrz5rp
Y
DIRECT ACCESS
ACCESS
 Pick up and give/show-This access methodology can be
useful for children who benefit from directly passing the
symbol to their partner. Directly giving symbols to a
partner can assist children who have difficulty
understanding communicative intent of pointing.
 This access method may also improve receptive
understanding for children who may be visually
overwhelmed by the complexity of the whole PODD
display.
 This access is often helpful for children with ASD.
(PODD Communication Books, US letter paper version, 2008)
Partner-Assisted Scanning-Access
 Partner-Assisted Scanning
 Partner provides scanning by showing/pointing and/or
speaking the names of items. The child responds to each scan
by indicating “yes” and/or “no”.
 Partner-assisted scanning may be:
Visual-The partner may ask a general question such as, “Is it in
this column?” or “This one.”
 Auditory-The partner reads out loud the labels for each symbol or
a group of symbols.
 Auditory plus visual-The partner both reads and shows/points out
loud the labels for each symbol. The child may rely on their
understanding of the labels or visually recognize the symbols.
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(PODD Communication Books US letter paper version, 2008)
Partner-Assisted Scanning -Access
 Recognize when the child may have something to say. They
may start to fuss, make a sound, look at you, or their book.
Ask them if they have something to say and if you get positive
look or confirmation, begin using book.
 A switch may be made available that the child can push to
indicate they have more to say.
 In the beginning stages may not have clear “yes” or “no”, but
read child’s body language and assume it is intentional.
 As the child becomes more proficient with PODD, need to
establish a more consistent and reliable yes/no response
system that all communication partners can recognize.
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Two Voice out-put devices such as Personal Talkers from Attainment
Company. Hold “no” to one side of the child’s head and “yes” to other side or
under her chin.
(Linda Burkhart, Partner Assisted Communication
with PODD)
PARTNER ASSISTED SCANNING
Linda Burkhart with
“Emma”
Visual plus auditory
scanning
 https://www.youtube.c
om/watch?v=TOvC9O
oygaA
ACCESS
 Eye Gaze PODD Communication Book
 The person with communication needs indicates the symbol
he/she wants using eye gaze.
 He/She looks at the symbol and their partner watches and
interprets.
 This PODD has a hole in the middle. A mirror can be placed
at the back of the book to support partners to read the child’s
eye gaze.
STYLES OF PODD COMMUNICATION BOOK
ONE PAGE OPENING
TWO PAGE OPENING
STYLES OF PODD BOOK
 Two page opening plus a side panel-The side panel is
accessible from all pages.
(PODD communication Books, US letter paper version, 2008)
Example of two page opening-Aided language Stimulation
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AMpJE_aRbdM
HOW TO CREATE
 A CD is available titled Pragmatic
Organization Dynamic Display
(PODD) communication books:
Direct Access Templatesavailable through Mayer Johnson
Co.
 Also need Boardmaker software,
color printer, laminator, or
weatherproof paper (8mm I
gage), binding coils.
 PODD uses Picture
Communication Symbols which
come with the Boardmaker
Program.
High Tech Implementation
 PODD is now available on Dynavox T10 Compass
Software, Tobii devices, and other window based devices.
 http://www.lburkhart.com/PODDSGD.html)
 PODD concepts and strategies were applied to the
creating of page sets for dynamic display devices. Overall
the vocabulary is similar which has created an easy
transition between the two systems. (PODD
Communication Books, US letter paper version, 2008)
Tobii Eye Gaze
 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nuTCb-
CWin0&app=desktop
TRAINING/More information
 For upcoming workshops in the United States visit
www.lburkhart.com
 The Pragmatic Organization Dynamic Display
Communication Book: Direct Access Templates, CD,
contains some valuable resources for learning more
about PODD. (printable reference book, information
about each PODD template)
 If you have questions about this presentation and/or
would like to learn more about PODD, please contact
Jessica Jakobe, M.A. CCC-SLP [email protected]

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