Advance Organizers and Nonlinguistic Representation

Report
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Advanced Organizers and
Nonlinguistic Representation
A Hoover CITW Session
December 2012
CITW Team
Advance Organizers and
Nonlinguistic Representation
 Educational
researchers have
shown that the activation of
prior knowledge is critical to
learning of all types.
•In what ways do you activate prior
knowledge in your classroom?
•What role does this prior knowledge play
in new learning?
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Generalizations from the Research:
Advance Organizers

Focus on what is important as opposed to what
is unusual

Higher level organizers produce deeper
learning than lower level organizers

Organizers are most useful with information
that is not well organized

Different types of organizers produce different
results
Classroom Practice In
Advance Organizers
 Expository
Advance Organizers (describing the
content)
 Narrative
Organizers (telling the information in a
story format)
 Graphic
Advance Organizers
Classroom Practice In
Advance Organizers
 Skimming
the Text
(read the bold print
or summary)
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Research on Learners
 18%
are auditory learners
 32%
are visual learners
 25%
are tactile learners
 25%
are kinesthetic learners
Greater than 50% of learners are
nonlinguistic!
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What is Nonlinguistic
Representation?
Expressing
as/through
information
Mental pictures
 Physical sensations such
as smell, taste, touch
 Kinesthetic association
 Sound

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How to Use Nonlinguistic
Representation
Graphic
Make
organizers
Physical Models
Generate
Draw
Mental Pictures
Pictures and Pictographs
Engage
in Kinesthetic Activity
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Examples of Nonlinguistic
Representation
Descriptive
Patterns
Time-Sequence
Patterns
Process/Cause-
Effect Patterns
Episode
Patterns
Generalization/
Principle Patterns
Concept
Patterns
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Descriptive Patterns
 They
can be used to represent facts about specific
persons, places, things, and events.
 The
information does not need to be in any
particular order.
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Time-Sequence Patterns
Organize
events in a specific
chronological order
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Process/Cause-Effect Patterns
 Organize
information into a casual network
leading to a specific outcome or into a
sequence of steps leading to a specific
product
EFFECT
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Episode Patterns
 Organize
information about specific events
including:
- a setting (time and place)
- specific people
- specific duration
- specific sequence of events
- particular cause and effect
Episode Patterns
PLACE
DURATION
TIME
CAUSE
PERSON
EPISODE
PERSON
EFFECT
PERSON
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Generalization/Principal Patterns
Organize
information into general
statements with supporting examples
Principle
Example
Example
Example
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Concept Patterns
The
most general of all patterns
Organize
information around a word
or phrase that represents entire
classes or categories of persons,
places things, and events
Concept Patterns
Example
CHARACTERISTIC
CONCEPT
CHARACTERISTIC
CHARACTERISTIC
Example
Example
Example
Example
Example
Example
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Make Physical Models
 Concrete
representation of the knowledge that is
being learned
 Souvenirs/tokens
 3D
models – dioramas
 File
folder reviews
Do the students know how the model
connects to the learning?
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Draw Pictures and Pictographs
Symbolic
pictures that represent the
knowledge that has been learned
Flip
books
Illustrate
vocabulary
Do the students know how the
picture connects to the learning?
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Engage in Kinesthetic Activity
 Physical
movement associated with
knowledge generates a mental image of the
knowledge in the mind
 Mental
 Role
images/pictures
playing/charades
 Hand/body
movements
“Actions speak louder than words”

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