Presentation

Report
Accessible Multimodal
Public Transport South Africa’s Future
Khibi Manana
Department of
Transport
Pretoria
South Africa
Amanda Gibberd
Department of
Transport
Pretoria
South Africa
Jim Stanbury
Arcus GIBB (Pty)
Ltd
Cape Town
South Africa
Ari Sierlis
Quadriplegic
Association of
South Africa
Durban, SA
1
Contents
1.
Purpose of the paper
2.
Introduction
3.
Understanding the status quo of the existing system
4.
Legislation and policy guiding the Accessible Public Transport
Strategy
5.
Defining an end goal: what is an accessible public transport
system?
6.
Programmes in the Accessible Public Transport Strategy
7.
Progress in creating an enabling environment
8.
Progress in upgrading existing public transport and developing
integrated public transport networks (IPTN’s)
9.
Lessons learnt
10. Conclusion
3
1. Purpose of the paper
 The paper records the development of the
Implementation Strategy to guide the provision of
Accessible Public Transport in South Africa
(“Accessible Public Transport Strategy”)
 This strategy is the culmination of work over the last 10
to 20 years
 It has been developed into a Programme of Action
which is being implemented through a new position
within the Department
 Projects are now materialising that break new ground in
universal access both nationally and internationally
 The implementation process has just begun. Evaluation
is needed in 5 to 10 years
2
2. Introduction
South Africa is developing public transport networks that can be used by
everyone. These are called integrated public transport networks (IPTNs).
Public transport networks are created by the integration of local rail, bus, mini
bus taxi and on-demand services; linking with long-distance services.
The National Department of Transport (NDoT) has prioritised Bus Rapid
Transport (BRT) and Rapid Rail as critical elements of the IPTN where the
municipal situation warrants such an intervention, i.e. passenger numbers and
demand indicate that a special intervention is required.
The NDoT is required by law to provide for passengers with special categories
of need in public transport.
3. Understanding the status quo of
the existing system
 Existing road and rail public transport is generally not
accessible to all passengers. Some of the problems are:
•
Lack of pre-travel information
•
Inaccessible route from origin to boarding point
•
Inaccessible infrastructure
•
Inaccessible, overcrowded vehicles in which to travel
•
Inadequate customer services and customer care
•
No integrated network
 Localised improvements were being made, but there was a
need for a paradigm shift for government and operators
4
3. Legislation and policy
 South Africa is very clear on its approach
to human rights. It has adopted the
United Nations Convention on the Rights
of Persons with Disabilities and the
Optional Protocol.
 This commits South Africa to a universal
design approach to the provision of all
services, including transport
 National Legislation includes:
•
•
•
•
Promotion of Equality and Prevention of Unfair Discrimination Act (2000).
“ The “burden of proof” lies with the respondent not complainant”
The National Land Transport Act (2009). This identifies passengers with
special categories of need in transport systems (people with disabilities, elderly
people, young children and those accompanying children)
Public Transport Strategy (2007). “100% Accessible!”
Accessible Public Transport Implementation Strategy and Action Plan
(2011 Draft). A series of programmes that can be implemented over time.
5
4. Defining the end goal: what is
an accessible public transport system?
 Accessible Public Transport Strategy proposes that a
universally accessible system is one that consists of:
•
“Mainstream system that are usable by all people,
to the greatest extent possible, and
•
Complemented by demand responsive services
which provide for people for whom the mainstream
service does not meet their needs”
6
4. Defining the end goal (cont)
 The network is based on the concept of the travel chain:
Plan a Trip
Get to pick
up point
Give Feedback
on trip
Travel
Chain
Get to
destination
Get out of
the vehicle
Get into
the vehicle
This requires universally
accessible:
• Transport planning
• Operations
• Marketing & communications
• Customer care
• Fare systems
• Passenger information
• Infrastructure
• Vehicles
Make the
Journey
The Department of Transport’s goal is to put in place travel chains that
can be used by the whole of society throughout the country, in all
public transport networks.
7
5. Programmes in the Accessible
Public Transport Strategy
Accessible Public Transport Strategy
Five Thrusts of the Implementation Strategy
1
2
3
Creation of
an enabling
environment
Continuous
upgrading of
existing
services
(Modal
Upgrading)
Provision of
Integrated
Rapid Public
Transport
Networks
(IRPTNs)
and
Integrated
Public
Transport
Networks
4
Roll-out of
Rural
Transport
Packages
5
Legacy
projects (for
example the
2010 FIFA
World Cup)

The Accessible Public Transport Strategy was accepted
through workshops and presentations to stakeholders

This included transport providers and passenger user groups
8
6. Progress in creating an enabling
environment: mechanisms






National funding of public transport
networks to assist the 12 largest cities to
provide infrastructure and procure technical
support, and for rail network improvements
National funding of public transport
operations to improve accessibility of vehicles
and services
National funding for road safety to improve
non-motorized transport for pedestrians
Funding for the recapitalization of mini-bus
taxis so that they are safer and easier to get
into
Universal access plan as a funding output of
some grants and now being voluntarily adopted
by other modes, as a means of complying with
national legislation
A New version of the Building Regulations
has been published as a minimum standard,
which is more in line with international norms
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
The Universal Design Access Plan
Transport planning
Operational context
Marketing and communications
Customer care
The fare system
Passenger information and way finding
9
Infrastructure
Vehicles
6. Progress in creating an
enabling environment: access experts
 There is an access auditor working within the
Department, to oversee and audit the work of the access
consultants
 Access consultants work on each transport mode, to write
and implement the Universal Access Plan; assisting the
work of the infrastructurel and operations teams
 They all have a vigorous understanding of:
• The social model of disability and functional
requirements of passengers
• Universal access within all aspects of the travel chain
• National legislation and policy
10
7. Progress in developing new
IPTNs
 Network development
• Integrating all modes of public transport
 Improvements to “Non-motorised transport (NMT)”
•
•
•
Better pedestrian infrastructure within 500m of each
station / stop (both trunk and feeder)
New cycle lanes
Responds to South Africa’s commitments to COP17
(Prioritising and increasing walking and cycling)
11
7. Progress in developing new
IPTNs (cont)
 Gautrain High Speed Rail
•
Links Pretoria, Johannesburg and OR Tambo
International Airport
•
Provides world class travel for all and sets new
standards for South Africa beyond the minimum
standards of the Building Regulations
•
Appointment of an access consultant to review and deal
with issues on an on-going basis
•
An internal position has been created to deal with
customer relations issues and identify those that can be
mitigated immediately
•
Regular discussions with the stakeholder group, the
South African Disability Alliance to monitor and improve
accessibility as needed, within an agreed timeframe
12
7. Progress in developing new IPTNs
(cont)
 Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) systems
•
•
•
New trunk system are in operation in Cape Town and Johannesburg with
a review of high vs. low floor. The debate is currently in progress.
Three more BRT systems will start to run during the period 2013-2015
Accessible feeder systems are being in place
including fully accessible low floor buses
13
7. Progress in upgrading existing
public transport (cont)
 Passenger rail
•
After years of underinvestment, a substantial budget has been allocated to
upgrade rail infrastructure and purchase new, accessible, rolling stock
•
Platform heights are being adjusted on selected stations so that level
boarding is achieved, and station infrastructure is being upgraded
•
Customer service issues are gaining momentum and a proper forum for
dealing with problems is being established
•
The Passenger Rail Agency now has a universal access policy and is
developing a universal design access plan
14
7. Progress in upgrading existing
public transport
 Private bus / taxi operators
•
•
•
•
Some private operators are purchasing accessible buses and metered
taxis although not yet legally required to do so
Discussions have begun with bus operators on how to bring in
accessible vehicles that are financially viable
A process of identifying obstructive or out of date complementary
legislation has begun
Discussions have begun with the bus and taxi industry on the
introduction of Universal Design Access Plans
15
8. Lessons learnt

South Africa has come a long way and still has a long way to go.
However, we have achieved a significant paradigm shift.

Some lessons learnt include:
•
Political will and champions are essential (Ministers and Mayors
resolutions on universally accessible public transport are being
prepared)
•
Policy and legislation is in place but the core difficulty is to get
acceptance that passengers with special categories of need have a right
to use public transport
•
A programme and system for implementation which includes
monitoring and evaluation is required to keep the process moving over
the required time period
•
A Universal Design Access Plan developed by an experienced
Access Consultant is essential
16
8. Lessons learnt
•
Government funding needs to include the condition to create universal
accessible transport services
•
Partnership and co-operation between all spheres of government and
transport operators is vital. Especially to resolve initial resistance based
upon costs (real or perceived) and identification of beneficiaries
•
Capacity building of every one who is involved is required. The skill in
universal access is not available throughout the country nor in all sectors.
Awareness training of front line staff is essential
•
Stakeholder groups should be as involved as possible but groups are
fragmented making consultations difficult. The access consultant plays a
key role in involving stakeholders at local level
17
9. Conclusion

Ten years ago South Africa had no accessible public transport.
Now every new system is being made universally accessible and
existing systems are being upgraded over time

We are achieving this through partnerships, or as better put by
Nelson Mandela:
“Those who are ready to join hands can
overcome the greatest challenges”
18
Thank You
Dankie
Enkosi

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