PowerPoint - Office of Research

Report
Department of Energy
Research Priorities and Funding Opportunities
Eric A. Rohlfing
Director; Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division
Office of Basic Energy Sciences
Office of Science, Department of Energy
Federal Update Webinar
October 29, 2012
Washington, D.C.
1
Outline
• Department of Energy Overview
• Funding Overview and Opportunities
• Science and Technology for Innovation and Clean
Energy
• Other Opportunities for Getting Involved
2
Department of Energy
Overview
3
Long-Term, Strategic Planning
• Programmatic planning and research priorities across DOE are
guided by the 2011 Strategic Plan and the Quadrennial Technology
Review.
http://energy.gov/downloads/2011-strategic-plan
http://energy.gov/quadrennial-technology-review
4
Secretary
Steven Chu
Advanced Research Projects
Agency – Energy
Eric Toone (Dep. Director)
Deputy Secretary
Daniel B. Poneman
Under Secretary for Nuclear
Security/Administrator for
National Nuclear Security
Administration
Thomas P. D’Agostino
Under Secretary
for Science
Under Secretary
David Sandalow (A)
Vacant
Office of Science
Defense Nuclear
Nonproliferation
William Brinkman
Patricia Dehmer
Defense Programs
Basic Energy Sciences
High Energy Physics
Naval Reactors
Harriet Kung
James Siegrist
Counter-terrorism
Advanced Scientific
Computing Research
Dan Hitchcock
Nuclear Physics
Biological & Environ.
Research
Sharlene Weatherwax
Fusion Energy Sciences
SBIR/STTR
Workforce Develop. for
Teachers & Scientists
Patricia Dehmer (A)
Defense Nuclear
Security
Emergency
Operations
Manny Oliver
Tim Hallman
Ed Synakowski
Energy Efficiency &
Renewable Energy
David Danielson
Fossil Energy
Charles McConnell
(A)
Nuclear Energy
Peter Lyons
Electricity Delivery
& Energy Reliability
Pat Hoffman
Continuum of Research, Development, and Deployment
Discovery
Research
Use-Inspired
Basic Research
Office of Science
Goal: new knowledge / understanding
Focus: phenomena
Metric: knowledge generation
Technology
Maturation
& Deployment
Applied
Research
ARPA-E*
Applied Programs
Goal: practical targets
Focus: performance
Metric: milestone achievement
 Basic research to
 Basic research for
 Basic research for
 Proof of new,
 Research with the
address
fundamental new
fundamental new
higher-risk concepts
goal of meeting
fundamental
understanding on
understanding,
technical
 Prototyping of new
limitations of current
materials or
usually with the goal
milestones, with
technology concepts
theories and
systems that may
of addressing
emphasis on the

Explore
feasibility
of
descriptions of
revolutionize or
scientific
development,
scale-up of
matter in the energy
transform today’s
showstoppers on
performance, cost
demonstrated
range important to
energy technologies
real-world
reduction, and
technology concepts
everyday life –
applications in the
durability of
in
a
“quick-hit”
typically energies up
energy technologies
materials and
fashion.
to those required to
components or on
break chemical
efficient processes
bonds.
 Scale-up research
 Small-scale and atscale demonstration
 Cost reduction
 Manufacturing R&D
 Deployment
support, leading to
market adoption
 High cost-sharing
with industry
partners
* ARPA-E targets technology gaps, high-risk concepts, aggressive delivery times
6
Performer
Funding Modality
Funding Source
Funding Overview
Office of Science
Applied Programs
ARPA-E
Funding
Individual
Awards
Small Groups
[e.g., EFRCs]
Large,
Multi-disciplinary
Groups [e.g., Hubs]
Facilities
Large-Scale
Demonstrations
Funding
Universities
National Labs
Small
Businesses
Large
Corporations/
Utilities
7
DOE FY 2013 Budget Request
http://www.mbe.doe.gov/cf30/budgetmap/budgetmap.html
Office of Science Research Underpins Energy Technologies
• The Office of Science commands an arsenal of basic science
capabilities—major scientific user facilities, national laboratories, and
researchers—that we are using to break down the barriers to new
energy technologies.
• We have focused these capabilities on critical national needs, e.g.,
through the Bioenergy Research Centers, the Energy Frontier
Research Centers, the Combustion Research Facility, the Joint
Genome Institute, the five Nanoscience Centers, and the new Energy
Innovation Hubs.
9
Office of Science
Science to Meet the Nation’s Challenges Today and into the 21st Century
The Frontiers of Science
 Supporting research that led to over
100 Nobel Prizes during the past 6
decades—more than 20 in the past
10 years
 Providing 45% of Federal support of
basic research in the physical and
energy related sciences and key
components of the Nation’s basic
research in biology and computing
 Supporting over 25,000 Ph.D.
scientists, graduate students,
undergraduates, engineers, and
support staff at more than 300
institutions
21st Century Tools of Science
 Providing the world’s largest
collection of scientific user facilities
to over 26,500 users each year 10
Science, Innovation, and DOE’s Office of Science
• Science is the basis of technology and underpins America’s energy
future.
• Science of the 20th century brought us the high standard of living we
now enjoy. Today, we are laying the foundations for the new
technologies of the coming decades.
• Progress in science and technology depends on continuing advances
in, and replenishment from, basic research, where the federal
government—and SC—plays a unique role.
• A highly trained work force is required to invent the future—scientists
and engineers trained in the most modern science and technologies
and with access to the best tools.
11
Funding Opportunities
Office of Science
Other DOE Programs
12
Office of Science Open Solicitation
• The Office of Science issues one cross-cutting solicitation that is open
year-round:
– Continuation of Solicitation for the Office of Science Financial Assistance
Program
• The open solicitation is:
– an ongoing solicitation that is tied to the federal budget cycle.
– for the submission of new, renewal, and supplemental applications.
• As with all applications, submission is through Grants.gov. More info
at http://science.doe.gov/grants/announcements.asp
• Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs) can also be focused on
a specific topic. The Office of Science issues about 40 FOAs per year.
13
Office of Science Funding Opportunities – Grants & Contracts Website
Annual Open Solicitation
Specialized FOAs
14
Specific Funding Opportunities on Office of Science Websites
15
Specific Funding Opportunities on Office of Science Websites
•
Advanced Scientific Computing Research
– http://science.energy.gov/ascr/funding-opportunities/
•
Basic Energy Sciences
– http://science.energy.gov/bes/funding-opportunities/
•
Biological and Environmental Research
– http://science.energy.gov/ber/funding-opportunities/
•
Fusion Energy Sciences
– http://science.energy.gov/fes/funding-opportunities/
•
High Energy Physics
– http://science.energy.gov/hep/funding-opportunities/
•
Nuclear Physics
– http://science.energy.gov/np/funding-opportunities/
•
Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists
– http://science.energy.gov/wdts/
•
Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology
Transfer (STTR)
– http://science.energy.gov/sbir/funding-opportunities/
16
Office of Science Early Career Research Program
•
Purpose: To support individual research programs of outstanding scientists early in
their careers and to stimulate research careers in the disciplines supported by the
Office of Science
•
Eligibility: Within 10 years of receiving a Ph.D., either untenured academic assistant
professors on the tenure track or full-time DOE national lab employees
•
Award Size:
•
•
–
University grants $150,000 per year for 5 years to cover summer salary and expenses
–
National lab awards $500,000 per year for five years to cover full salary and expenses
FY 2013 Application Process:
–
Funding Opportunity Announcement was issued July 2012. Mandatory pre-applications were
due September 6, 2012 and are no longer being accepted.
–
Full applications from those encouraged to submit are due November 26, 2012.
Program has run for three years with a total of 206 awards distributed broadly
across the country in universities and national laboratories.
http://science.energy.gov/early-career/
17
Office of Science Merit Review Criteria
• The Office of Science peer review follows 10 CFR Part 605 to
evaluate applications based on the following four criteria, which are
listed in order of decreasing importance:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Scientific and/or technical merit of the project;
Appropriateness of the proposed method or approach;
Competency of the personnel and adequacy of proposed resources; and
Reasonableness and appropriateness of the proposed budget.
• The criteria for a review may also include other appropriate factors
established and announced by the Office of Science.
• Proposals are reviewed and award decisions made generally within
six months and no longer than twelve months from the date of receipt.
• Review criteria for other DOE program offices are similar, often
following 10 CFR Part 600 but with specific criteria specified in the
funding opportunity announcement.
18
DOE Unsolicited Proposals – Energy Technology
• An unsolicited proposal is an application for support of an idea,
method, or approach, which is submitted by an individual, business,
and organization solely on the proposer's initiative, rather than in
response to a DOE solicitation. Funding of unsolicited proposals is
considered a noncompetitive action.
• The proposal document should persuade the staff of DOE and other
qualified members of the scientific and engineering community who
review the proposed work, that the project represents a worthwhile
approach to the investigation of an important, timely problem. Each
proposal should be self-contained and written with clarity and
thoroughness.
• The proposal must present:
–
–
–
–
–
Objectives that show the pertinence of the proposed work to DOE
Rationale of the approach
Methods to be pursued
Qualifications of the investigators and the institution (if applicable)
Level of funding required to attain the objectives
More info at:
http://www.netl.doe.gov/business/usp/unsol.html
19
Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy
•
•
The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) accelerates
development and facilitates deployment of energy efficiency and renewable
energy technologies and market-based solutions that strengthen U.S. energy
security, environmental quality, and economic vitality.
Topical areas of interest:
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
•
Biomass
Buildings (efficiency)
Geothermal Energy
Fuel Cells
Advanced Manufacturing
Solar Energy
Vehicle Technologies (including electric vehicles)
Wind Power
Water (crosscutting)
Current open solicitations are posted at:
http://www1.eere.energy.gov/financing/business.html
http://www.eere.energy.gov/
20
Office of Nuclear Energy
• Nuclear Energy University Programs
– Created in 2009 to consolidate university support under one program.
– Funds nuclear energy research and equipment upgrades at U.S. colleges
and universities, and provides student educational support.
– Objectives are to support outstanding, cutting-edge and innovative
research at U.S. universities by:
• Attracting the brightest students to the nuclear profession and supporting the
nation's intellectual capital in nuclear engineering and relevant nuclear
science, such as health physics, radiochemistry and applied nuclear physics.
• Integrating research and development at universities, national laboratories and
industry to revitalize nuclear education.
• Improving university and college infrastructures for conducting R&D and
educating students.
• Facilitating the transfer of knowledge from the aging nuclear workforce to the
next generation of workers.
www.neup.gov
21
Office of Fossil Energy
•
University Coal Research Program
– Provides grants to U.S. universities to support fundamental research that cuts
across the National Energy Technology Laboratory’s research focus areas and
improves fossil energy technologies.
– Goals are to:
• Sustain a national university program of research in energy and environmental science
and engineering related to coal that focuses on innovative and fundamental investigations
pertinent to coal conversion and utilization.
• Provide a future supply of coal scientists and engineers through research exposure to coal
technologies while advancing the science of clean energy from coal.
• Improve our fundamental scientific and technical understanding of chemical and physical
processes involved in the conversion and utilization of coal—one of our nation's most
abundant natural resources—and its by-products.
•
Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Other Minority Institutions
(HBCU/OMI) Program
– Provides a mechanism for cooperative research among HBCU/OMI institutions, the
private sector, and Federal agencies to generate fresh ideas and tap underutilized
talent, define applicable fundamental scientific principles, and develop advanced
concepts for generating new and improved technologies across the full spectrum of
fossil energy R&D programs.
http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/coalpower/advresearch/initiatives/ucr.html
http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/coalpower/advresearch/initiatives/hbcu.html
22
Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability
• Mission is to lead national efforts to modernize the electric grid;
enhance security and reliability of the infrastructure; and facilitate
recovery from disruptions to energy supply.
• Research and development activities advance smart grid functionality
by developing innovative, next-generation technologies and tools in
the areas of transmission, distribution, energy storage, power
electronics, cybersecurity and the advancement of precise timesynchronized measures of certain parameters of the electric grid.
• Priorities include:
–
–
–
–
Clean Energy Transmission and Reliability
Smart Grid Research and Development
Energy Storage
Cybersecurity for Energy Delivery Systems
http://energy.gov/oe/mission/research-and-development-rd
23
Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy
•
•
Established in 2009 with funding from the American Recovery and
Reinvestment Act.
ARPA-E is charged with the following objectives:
– To focus on creative “out-of-the-box” transformational energy research that industry
by itself cannot or will not support due to its high risk but where success would
provide dramatic benefits for the nation;
– To utilize an ARPA-like organization that is flat, nimble, and sparse, capable of
sustaining programs whose promise remains real, while phasing out programs that
do not prove to be as promising as anticipated; and
– To create a new tool to bridge the gap between basic energy research and
development/industrial innovation.
•
•
•
Funding opportunities are generally narrowly focused and initiated with a
workshop to discuss the current landscape and unique role for ARPA-E.
There have been two open FOAs to date where any idea in all areas of
energy R&D could be submitted for consideration.
ARPA-E does not have continuing awards, e.g., all awards are fully funded for
the project period (subject to satisfactory technical progress) and not
renewable.
http://arpa-e.energy.gov/
24
National Nuclear Security Administration
•
Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Program
– Supports grants and cooperative agreements in areas vital to NNSA’s mission
success:
•
•
•
•
Materials under Extreme Conditions
High Energy Density Physics
Low Energy Nuclear Science
Radiochemistry
– Objectives are to:
• Support the U.S. scientific community by funding research projects at universities that
conduct fundamental science and technology research that is of relevance to Stockpile
Stewardship;
• Provide opportunities for intellectual challenge and collaboration by promoting scientific
interactions between the academic community and scientists at the DOE/NNSA
laboratories;
• Develop and maintain a long-term recruiting pipeline to the NNSA laboratories by
increasing the visibility of the NNSA scientific activities to U.S. academic communities.
•
Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship Program
– Provides outstanding benefits and opportunities to students pursuing a Ph.D. in
areas of interest to stewardship science, such as high-energy density physics, lowenergy nuclear science, or properties of materials under extreme conditions.
http://nnsa.energy.gov/aboutus/ourprograms/defenseprograms/defensescienceuniversityprograms-0
25
Science and Technology for
Innovation and Clean Energy
26
Cross-cutting Investments and Coordination
• DOE has increasingly emphasized cross-program communications
and collaboration to ensure coordination of basic and applied
research and effective integration of R&D results.
– Technology Teams: working groups focused on specific technologies the
meet to coordinate R&D programs across the Department and define new
strategic directions
– Energy Innovation Hubs: working group to coordinate programmatic
oversight and promote commonality across all the Hubs
– ARPA-E: ad-hoc groups to identity “white space” where others are not
making investments in energy technologies but that would be appropriate
for ARPA-E support
– Topical items of interest: working groups at the program level established
to promote information exchange and coordination or to address current
issues (e.g., the Critical Materials Hub).
27
Science for Innovation and Clean Energy
• Applications of 21st century science to long-standing barriers in
energy technologies: employing nanotechnology, biotechnology, and
modeling and simulation.
– Materials and chemical processes by design using nanoscale and
mesoscale structures for scientific advances and manufacturing
innovations in solar energy conversion; clean-energy electricity
generation; battery and vehicle transportation; and carbon capture, use,
and sequestration.
– Biosystems by design targeting the development of synthetic biology
tools and technologies and integrative analysis of experimental genomic
science datasets for the design and construction of improved biofuels and
bioproducts.
– Modeling and simulation using the Office of Science’s Leadership
Computing Facilities and production computing facilities to advance
materials and chemistry by design and to broadly address energy
technology challenges.
28
Materials Genome Initiative
• The Materials Genome Initiative will create a new era of materials
innovation that will serve as a foundation for strengthening domestic
industries… and offers a unique opportunity for the United States to
discover, develop, manufacture, and deploy advanced materials at
least twice as fast as possible today, at a fraction of the cost.
• Multiagency Initiative led by the Office of Science and Technology
Policy
• DOE role:
– Software development, building on theory and partnering (BES)
• Robust, accurate and multiscale in both size and time
– Validation of software and theory
• User facilities and broad experimental materials science portfolio
– Application specific R&D for manufacturing and to develop lightweight,
high-strength alloys for automotive (EERE)
• Technical emphasis includes materials for clean energy
http://www.whitehouse.gov/mgi
29
Science for Innovation and Clean Energy
Materials and Chemical Processes by Design
•
Research to establish design rules to launch an era of
predictive modeling, changing the paradigm of
materials discovery to rational design.
–
Prediction: New battery materials
starting from first principles theory
New software tools and data standards to catalyze a fully
integrated approach from material discovery to
applications
•
Discovery of new materials has been the engine
driving science frontiers and fueling technology
innovations. Research would utilize the powerful suite
of tools for materials synthesis, characterization, and
simulation at DOE’s world-leading user facilities
•
Integrated teams to focus on key scientific knowledge
gaps to develop new theoretical models
–
Long-term: realization in reusable and broadlydisseminated software
–
Collection of validated experimental and modeling data
for broader community use
Validation:
Materials
Testfabrication
http://materialsproject.org/
End Use: Software on-line for
general community use
30
Science for Innovation and Clean Energy
Biosystems by Design
•
•
•
Research to establish biological design rules will
enable the predictive design of innovative natural
and hybrid systems for clean energy production.
Discovery and synthetic redesign of plant and
microbial systems advances science
understanding and paves the way for sustainable
production of biofuels and bioproducts.
Research areas of emphasis:
–
New synthetic biology methods—genome-scale
engineering of plants and microbes
–
New genetic toolkits
–
Development of functional modules and platform
organisms
–
Predictive integration of components and processes
–
Verify & validate computer-aided design toolkits
–
New testbeds to prototype performance and function
Modeling
Genomic scale
models
Iterative
engineering
Genomics
and analysis
tools
Design
engineering
31
Science for Innovation and Clean Energy
Modeling and Simulation
Argonne Leadership Computing Facility
•
The Cray XT5 (Jaguar) at ORNL and the IBM Blue Gene/P
(Intrepid) at ANL will provide ~2.3 billion processor hours in
FY12 to address science and engineering problems that defy
traditional methods of theory and experiment and that require
the most advanced computational power.
•
Peer reviewed projects are chosen to advance science, speed
innovation, and strengthen industrial competitiveness.
•
Among the topics supported in FY11:
–
–
–
–
Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility
In FY 2012, the Argonne LCF will be upgraded with a
10 petaflop IBM Blue Gene/Q. The Oak Ridge LCF will
continue site preparations for a system expected in FY 2013
that will be 5-10 times more capable than the Cray XT-5.
Nuclear Reactor Simulation
Fusion Plasmas
–
–
–
Nanoscale Science
Advancing materials for lithium air batteries, solar cells, & superconductors
Exploring carbon sequestration
Improving combustion in fuel-efficient, near-zero-emissions systems
Understanding how turbulence affects the efficiency of aircraft and other
transportation systems
Designing next-generation nuclear reactors and fuels and extending the life
of aging reactors
Developing fusion energy systems
Understanding the roles of ocean, atmosphere, land, & ice in climate change
Biofuels
Energy Storage Materials
Turbulence
32
The EV Everywhere
TheChallenge
EV Everywhere Challenge
Goal: Enable U.S. companies to produce electric
vehicles that are as affordable and convenient for
the average American family as today’s gaspowered vehicles within the next 10 years (by
2022)
A Clean Energy Grand Challenge
• Invest in breakthrough R&D for advanced batteries,
electric drivetrain technologies, lightweight vehicle
structure, and fast-charging technology.
• Bring together America’s best and brightest
scientists, engineers, and businesses to produce
electric vehicles at lower cost, with an improved
vehicle range and an increased fast-charging
ability.
33
EV Everywhere Battery Targets
Battery affordability and performance are critical advances that are needed
in order to achieve the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge
Chevy Volt
•
•
•
•
Nissan Leaf
~40 mile electric range
HEV: 32 mpg /300 miles
16 kWh / 120 kW battery
Battery Cost: ~$8,000
Tesla
• ~ 250 mile electric range
• ≥ 85 kWh / 270 kW battery
• Battery Cost: ~$35,000
• ~75 mile electric range
• ≥ 24 kWh / 80 kW battery
• Battery Cost: ~$12,000
EV Everywhere Target Analysis
Current Status
PHEV40
AEV100
AEV300
Battery Cost
$/kWh (usable)
< 600
190
300
110
Pack Specific Energy
Wh/kg
80-100
150
180
225
Pack Energy Density
Wh/L
200
250
300
425
SOC Window
%
50
80
90
90
34
SunShot
• The DOE-EERE SunShot Initiative is a collaborative national initiative
to make solar energy cost competitive with other forms of energy by
the end of the decade and restore U.S. leadership in the global clean
energy race.
SunShot Goal
35
DOE Critical Materials Efforts
• The Office of Science/BES supports fundamental science relevant to
sustainable use of elements and materials across many core research
programs: catalysis science, solar photochemistry, biosciences,
separations and analysis, heavy element chemistry, condensed
matter physics, materials chemistry, etc.
• Advanced Research Projects – Energy (ARPA-E) has14 projects
(total ~$30M) under the Rare Earth Alternatives in Critical Energy
Technologies (REACT) program.
• The Office of Policy and International Affairs (PI) led the
development of the DOE Critical Materials Strategy, first released in
2010 and updated in 2011.
• The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE),
Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) is supporting the Energy
Innovation Hub for Critical Materials, which was funded at $20M in the
FY 2012 appropriation.
36
DOE Critical Materials Strategy
• Examines role of rare earth metals and other
materials in the technologies anticipated for the
clean energy economy.
• Main highlights:
– Several current clean energy technologies use
materials at risk of supply disruptions in the short
term. Risks will decrease in longer term.
– Supply challenges of five RE metals
(dysprosium, terbium, europium, neodymium,
and yttrium) may affect clean energy technology
deployment in coming years.
– DOE and other stakeholders have scaled up
work in the past year to address challenges.
– Building workforce capabilities will help address
vulnerabilities.
Update of strategy originally
released in December, 2010
2011 Critical Materials Strategy is available at:
http://energy.gov/node/349057
37
DOE Coordination on Critical Materials
• A DOE-wide team consisting of staff from EERE-AMO, SC-BES,
ARPA-E, and PI has:
– Conducted an open workshop to gather more community input on
objectives for the Critical Materials Hub in April, 2012.
– Drafted the Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA); published May
2012; applications received August 2012.
– Is overseeing the merit review and award selection process.
• Hub Goal: Reduce or eliminate
criticality for existing materials and
prevent future criticality of materials
that are essential to modern and
emerging energy technologies.
• Emphasis is placed on impacting the
entire lifecycle of critical materials, with
particular focus on the elements found
to be most critical in the DOE Critical
Materials Strategy (2011).
38
Carbon Capture and Storage projects at BES, ARPA-E and
FE/NETL are distinct, yet synergistic
Basic
Research
Applied
Research
Bench
Scale
Slipstream
ARPA-E
Synthesis,
measurement,
modeling of new
materials
Basic Energy
Sciences
Separation science
and subsurface
geochemistry &
geophysics
High risk, high reward new
concepts such as phase change
technologies
Participation
at EFRC
review
meetings
Joint program
reviews and
expertise sharing
Successful projects apply
to NETL bench-scale or
slipstream FOAs
Fossil Energy / NETL
Proving technologies on the bench scale and
accelerating towards commercialization
Foster communication among
CCS scientists and engineers
Technology Readiness Level (TRL)
39
CCS Coordination Example: Gas Separations Energy Frontier Research Center
at University of California, Berkeley / Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
New materials such as metal
organic frameworks (MOFs, right)
and ionic liquids are the focus of
intense basic & applied research
metal ion or
cluster
+
organic linker
BES / EFRC
Basic Science Advances
ARPA-E
High Throughput Methodology
FE / NETL
Advanced Development
• New MOF chemistry and
functionalization of ligands
• Computational modeling of
new structures and prediction
of separation properties
• Improved cross-cutting
characterization techniques
• High throughput (HT) MOF
fabrication
• HT NMR as a pore size
screening technique
• HT gas sorption measurements
• MOF life-cycle analysis
• Industrial process simulations
• MOF testing under realistic
flue gas conditions
• Fabrication of mixed-matrix
membranes based on MOFs
• MOFs for oxygen separation
• Application of chemical
informatic models to prediction
of ionic liquid properties
40
Science-Based Engine Design
An early example
Basic Science
BES
Sustained support in 2 areas
Development of predictive
chemistry in model flames
Computational
kinetics and
experiments
Applied R&D
Manufacturing/
Commercialization
BES  EERE
Cummins and Dodge
Applications of chemistry and
diagnostics to engines
Cummins used simulation tools and
improved understanding of diesel fuel
sprays to design a new diesel engine with
reduced development time and cost and
improved fuel efficiency.
Predictive
chemical models
under realistic
conditions
Advance laser diagnostics
applied to model flames
Laser-based
chemical
imaging
Laser diagnostics
of diesel fuel
sprays in engine
cylinders
ISB 6.7 liter Cummins diesel
engine first marketed in the 2007
Dodge Ram pickup truck; more
than 200,000 sold
Platinum Monolayer Electro-Catalysts:
Stationary and Automotive Fuel Cells
Basic Science
BES
Two research advances
Applied R&D
Manufacturing/
Commercialization
BES  EERE
CRADA with Industry
Core-Shell Nanocatalysts
Pt core-shell nano-catalysts: high
activity with ultralow Pt mass
Active Pt ML shell – Metal/alloy core
Core tunes activity & durability of shell
Scale-up synthesis: Pt-ML/Pd9Au1/C
Excellent fuel Cell durability 200,000 cycles
Core-shell catalyst
Pt
Model and
actual image of
a Pt Monolayer
on Pd
nanoparticle
Pd
Standard catalyst
Pt
Pd
Membrane Electrode Assembly >200K cycles
Very small Pt diffusion & small Pd diffusion
1.2
Au0.67ML/Pt10/C
1
P t A u N i5/ C
-1
@0.9V
0.9
jk / A.mg
Pt stabilized against corrosion in
voltage cycling by Au clusters
0.6
P t A u N i5/ C
0.3
50mV/s, 0.1M HClO4
P t/ C
P t/ C
0.0
m a s s a cti vit y
j / mAcm
-2
Pt
0
N o ble
m e t a l m a s s a cti vit y
Pt-mass
weighted
activity
enhanced
20x
a
initial
30,000 cycles
-1
2nm
-2
0.0
0.4
0.8
1.2
E / V RHE
Science 315, 220 (2007)
3000 hr Fuel
Cell
Durability
Performance
Commercial license signed Dec. 2011
42
Superconducting Wire: From Science to the Grid
Basic Science
Applied R&D
Invented single crystal-like
flexible templates by the
kilometer:
Maximize current flow
(understand vortex
dynamics)
Develop
segregation
& growth
mechanisms
(new materials)
Ion Beam
Assisted
Deposition
(IBAD)
Understand
“quantum
effects” in film
growth
2 ML
Modify properties with
nanostructures
Manufacturing/
Commercialization
• Two companies are now
manufacturing kilometers of
superconducting cables based on
the IBAD and RABiTS processes
• These are deployed in three
demonstration projects in the grid.
Rolling Assisted Bi-axially
Textured Substrate (RABiTS)
Albany, NY
Developed epitaxial buffers:
1 mm
HTS
HTS
Buffers
Buffer
IBAD-MgO
RABiTSTM
Long Island, NY
Columbus, OH
Other Opportunities for Getting Involved
44
Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists
•
Mission:
– To help ensure that DOE and the Nation have a sustained pipeline of highly skilled
and diverse science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) workers.
•
Program Goals:
–
–
–
–
•
Increase the pipeline of talent pursuing research important to the Office of Science
Leverage the resources of the DOE national laboratories for education and training
Increase participation of under-represented students and faculty in STEM programs
Improve methods of evaluation of effectiveness of programs and impact on STEM
workforce
Signature Programs:
– Graduate Students: Office of Science Graduate Fellowship
– Undergraduates: Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships, Community
College Internships
– Teachers: Academies Creating Teacher Scientists, Einstein Fellowship Program
– Faculty: Visiting Faculty Program
– K-12: National Science Bowl
45
Visiting Faculty Program
• Summer research opportunity at DOE national laboratories for a
faculty member and up to 2 students from colleges and universities
historically underrepresented in the U.S. research community.
• Faculty collaborate with DOE laboratory research staff on a research
project of mutual interest.
• Application opens October each year and the laboratories begin
selections in February.
• Participating faculty and undergraduates receive stipend, travel, and
housing allowance for the 10 week experience. Graduate students are
expected to be supported by their home academic institution and
hence are eligible for travel and lodging allowance only.
• For more info: http://science.energy.gov/wdts/vfp/
46
Supporting and Encouraging Next Generation Scientists
The National Science Bowl
Middle School and High School Students
•
•
Begun in 1991, DOE’s National Science
Bowl® is a nationwide academic competition
that tests students' knowledge in all areas of
science. High school and middle school
students are quizzed in a fast paced Q&A
format similar to Jeopardy.
22,000 students from 1,500 schools; 6000
volunteers
First Lady Michelle Obama and Secretary of Energy Steven Chu
congratulate Albuquerque Academy, Albuquerque, NM, First
Place winner in the 2010 NSB Middle School competition .
Office of Science Graduate Fellowship
Graduate Students
•
Begun in 2009 with ARRA funding, the SCGF
program provides 3-year fellowship awards
totaling $50,500 annually.
•
The awards provide support towards tuition,
a stipend for living expenses, and support for
expenses such as travel to conferences and
to DOE user facilities.
DOE SCGF Cohort 2010 at the SCGF Annual Meeting at
Argonne National Laboratory.
http://science.energy.gov/wdts/nsb/
http://scgf.orau.gov/
47
Getting Involved
• Read about the core research areas on our websites and contact
program managers to discuss whether your ideas fit within their
programs.
• Volunteer to become a reviewer or participate in a workshop.
• Incorporate our large scientific user facilities into your research –
apply for time to perform research at a facility.
• Develop a collaboration with a Principal Investigator who works at a
DOE national laboratory.
• Follow federal advisory committee meetings.
• Respond to open and topical solicitations.
48
Thank You!
49

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