Insomia and Fatigue - Living Beyond Breast Cancer

Report
Insomnia and Fatigue
Andrea Richtel Branas, MSE, MPT, CLT
Lead Therapist
Good Shepherd Penn Partners
Abramson Cancer Center
Cancer Related Fatigue (CRF)
Distressing, persistent, subjective sense
physical, emotional, and/or cognitive
tiredness or exhaustion related to cancer or
cancer treatment that is not proportional to
recent activity and interferes with usual
functioning.
NCCN Guidelines V 1.2013, Cancer-Related Fatigue
Cancer Related Fatigue
• Reported as the most common and distressing
side effect of cancer treatment
• Affects 70-100% of the cancer population
• Can make it hard to:
– Be with friends and family
– Do daily activities
– Follow treatment plan
What does fatigue feel like?
• No energy
• Need more sleep
• Sleeping is not restful
• Normal activities are difficult to do
• Difficulty focusing your attention
What causes Fatigue?
Cancer and it’s treatment
What causes Fatigue
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Cancer
Cancer treatments (surgery, chemo, radiation)
Anemia
Insomnia/sleep disturbance
Nutrition
Depression and anxiety
Medications
Too much activity
Lack of exercise
Symptom Cluster
• Fatigue is commonly clustered with symptoms
of:
– Pain
– Sleep disturbance
– Emotional distress
How do we treat fatigue?
Patient Education
Energy conservation
Non-pharmacologic
Pharmacologic
Patient
Education
Adapted from NCCN Guidelines 1.2013 Cancer-Related Fatigue
Energy Conservation
•
•
•
•
Finding easier ways to perform tasks
Saving your energy
Avoiding fatigue, by balancing work and rest
Changing how you do activities
– So you can do more without as much fatigue
Energy Conservation
•
•
•
•
Pacing
Planning
Posture
Organization
How do we treat fatigue?
Patient Education
Energy conservation
Non-pharmacologic
Pharmacologic
Adapted from NCCN Guidelines 1.2013 Cancer-Related Fatigue
Non-Pharmacologic
• Activity Enhancement
– Exercise
– Rehabilitation
• Psychsocial Intervention
• Nutrition
“Activity Enhancement”
“It is reasonable to encourage all patients to
engage in a moderate level of physical activity
during and after cancer treatment”
ACSM Guidelines
• ACSM Roundtable on Exercise Guidelines for
Cancer Survivors
– Medicine & Science in Sports and Exercise, June 2010
• ***Avoid Inactivity***
• Exercise should be individualized
• Exercise is safe both during and after most types of cancer
treatment
Exercise with lymphedema
• Weight Lifting in Women with Breast-CancerRelated Lymphedema
• In breast cancer survivors with stable
lymphedema, slowly progressive weight lifting did
not significantly increase limb swelling.
– Decreased incidence of flares
– Decreased lymph symptoms
– Increased strength
Schmitz KH, et al. Weight Lifting in Women with Breast-Cancer-Related Lymphedema. N Engl J Med
2009;361:664-73.
Physical Activity
• American Cancer Society guidelines
– Adopt a physically active lifestyle.
• Adults:
– Moderate or greater activity for 30 minutes or more on five or
more days of the week.
– Always talk to your doctor/nurse first!
• Special precautions
– Low blood counts
– Bone metastases
Byers et al. (2002). American Cancer Society Guidelines on Nutrition and
Physical Activity for Cancer Prevention. CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians 52:
92-119.
How do you get started with exercise?
• Cancer
Certified
Trainer
• Physical
Therapy
Vs.
• Home
Vs.
Physical Therapy
– Not sure what to do
– Recent surgery
– Medically complex
– Lymphedema
– Very deconditioned
Exercise Specialist
• ACSM/ACS Certified Cancer Exercise Trainer
– No specific muscle/joint pains
– Need guidance
– No lymphedema
Exercise at Home
•
•
•
•
Experienced exerciser
Know how to slowly progress
Know how to come back after a holiday
Know how to monitor how hard you are
working
Bare minimum
•
•
•
•
Walk
Walk
Walk
Walk
• Something is more than nothing!
• Start Low and Progress Slow!
How do we treat fatigue?
Patient Education
Energy conservation
Non-pharmacologic
Pharmacologic
Adapted from NCCN Guidelines 1.2013 Cancer-Related Fatigue
Pharmacologic
• Medications for:
– Pain
– Insomnia
– stimulants
Sleep Distrubance
• Hypersomnia –sleeping too much
• Insomnia – not enough sleep
• 30%-75% of patients with cancer
Why is sleep disrupted?
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Pain
Anxiety
Night sweats
Upset stomach
Frequent urination
Difficulty breathing
Poor sleep habits
Medication
www.cancer.gov
Look closely at your sleep Issues
– Sleep history
– Impact of insomnia on daily activities
– Sleep diary
– Mood evaluation – check for depression & anxiety
– Apnea/snoring
ADL = activity of daily living
Fleishman. Journal of the National Cancer Institute Monographs No. 32. 2004; Bennett, Cameron, Brown, et al. Oncology
Nursing Forum. 2010.
Help for Insomnia
– Behavioral therapy
– Stimulus control therapy
– Sleep restriction therapy
– Sleep hygiene education
– Regular exercise
– Medications
Mills, Graci. Cancer Symptom Management. 2004; Savard, Simard, Ivers, et al. JCO. 2005.
Medical Treatments
CLASSIC THERAPIES
• Benzodiazepines
Imidazopyridines
Pyrazolopyrimidine
Pyrrolopyrazine
(temazepam)
(zolpidem)
(zaleplon)
(eszopiclone)
}
benzodiazepine receptor agonists
BZRAs
• Behavior Therapy
(sleep restriction, stimulus control)
• Antidepressants
(amitriptyline , trazodone, doxepin)
Savard, Simerd, Ivers, et al. JCO. 2005.
Other Pharmacologic strategies
• Psychostimulants
• Corticosteroids
• Antidepressants
– Treatment of depression related fatigue
• Herbals
– Promising
– Drug-drug interactions possible
NCCN Practice Guidelines in Oncology v1.2011: Cancer-Related Fatigue. Downloaded from
http://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/PDF/fatigue.pdf.
Controlling your fatigue
In your
control
Out of your
control
How do you gain control?
1. Know your symptoms
– Monitor symptoms regularly
2. Share your symptoms with
– Care team
– Family and friends
3. Try new treatments
– But only 1 at a time
Getting to know your fatigue
• Rate your fatigue
0
No
fatigue
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Worst
fatigue
you can
imagine
On your calendar
•
•
•
•
•
•
Fatigue
Mood
Activity
Medication
Stressors
Sleep
Symptoms Calendar
F= Fatigue
P = Pain
M= mood
S= hours of sleep
Exercise
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
F=3
P=2
Walk = 1
mile
Party
S= 8
F=5
P=4
No
exercise
S=7
F=3
P=3
Walk 2
miles
S=9
F=3
P=2
Lift weights
Share symptoms with care team
• Discuss:
– Medications
– Activity
– Sleep
– Mood
– Pain
Exercise
Sleep Hygiene
– Eliminate caffeine,
nicotine, & alcohol
– Check meds with MD
– Keep bedtime and waketime same
– Exercise
– Avoid late afternoon naps
– Eliminate big bedtime
snacks
–
–
–
–
–
–
Limit night-time fluids
Avoid noise
Keep correct temperature
Get outside
Get up if not sleeping
Reserve bed for sleep
Mills, Graci. Cancer Symptom Management. 2003; Savard, Simerd, Ivers, et al. JCO. 2005.
Eat Well
Managing Side Effects from the
Psycho/Social Point of View
– Side effects are
no fun!
– How you respond to side effects is completely up
to you
Managing Side Effects
• Relationship to Self
• Acceptance
• Emotional Release
• Not over-identifying with the body
• Relationship to Others
• Communicating Feelings
• Educating Others
• Getting help!
Moving On
What is the most loving thing
you can do for yourself?
Questions and Discussion

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