Pinetree Secondary School School District #43 (Coquitlam)

Report
Pinetree Secondary School
School District #43
Action Plan for Learning
Secondary School Level
June 2014
1
Pinetree Secondary School
3000 Pinewood Avenue, Coquitlam, BC
MISSION STATEMENT
Working with our community, we are dedicated to
preparing our students for success in a rapidly
changing world by providing a supportive learning
environment which recognizes and respects
individual differences, encourages students to
challenge personal limits, and promotes excellence.
2
School and Community Context
•
We have a culturally diverse population, and also welcome International
students from different parts of the world.
•
Honours and Advanced Placement courses provide opportunities for
academic enhancement and excellence.
•
Pinetree offers a large number of exciting elective programs with a wide range
of Fine Arts and Technology courses. In particular this year, the Drama
department won accolades at a provincial Shakespeare festival. Our music
department continues to flourish attracting high enrollment in each grade.
•
Pinetree students continue their strong tradition of excellence on Regional,
Provincial, National, and International Mathematics Contests!
•
Pinetree also has a unique timetable as it is custom made to accommodate the
needs of its students for learning opportunities at different times of the day.
3
Community Partnerships and Parent
Involvement
Pinetree shares its site with both Coquitlam Parks and Leisure Services as well as
Douglas College. This three-way partnership has enabled all partner groups to
benefit from cost sharing in the creation of exceptional physical education facilities.
Parks and Leisure Services
The Parent Advisory Council (PAC) is
an active partner at Pinetree
Secondary School. The School
Planning Committee and After Grad
Committee are supportive of our goals.
4
Graduation and Transition Rates
Overall Trends Over
Recent Years …
% of Grade 12 Students
Eligible to Graduate who
Graduate
A slight increase from 95%
(2008/09) to 96% (2012/13)
% of First-Time Grade 12
Students who Graduate
Steady from 83% (2008/09)
to 83% (2012/13)
5
Data Analysis
• Females have stronger graduation rates.
• There are more males at Pinetree, which
significantly skews our school’s statistics
(e.g. 60% of the grade 10 class is male;
56% of the grade 9 class is
male).
• The increasing number of males
poses challenges for class
composition and instruction.
6
Graduation and Transition
Rates continued…
Trends Over Recent Years …
[Source: Ministry of Education]
Aboriginal Students
% of Grade 12 Students Eligible to Graduate Who Graduate
No Change from 100% (2003/04) to 100% (2007/08)
% of First-Time Grade 12 Students who Graduate
Decrease from 89% (2003/04) to 86% (2007/08)
** Note – Data for 2013/2014 is currently unavailable.
7
Relevant Background
Goal 1
•
Reading Comprehension: To improve student literacy skills
through the teaching of reading.
Objective 1
•
To improve student literacy skills through the teaching of
reading strategies and metacognitive awareness.
Rationale for Objective 1
There are several reasons why reading is important for students:
1. Students who read tend to be more creative and have
higher achievement rates in school and college.
2. People who read participate more fully as citizens (i.e.
voting).
3. Reading skills are necessary for the development of critical
thinking skills.
Sofsian, Damian. (2006, November 09). The Importance Of Reading. EzineArticles.
Retrieved May 05, 2008, from http://ezinearticles.com/?The-Importance-OfReading&id=354498
8
Goal #1
Reading Comprehension
Students will improve their literacy skills by
focusing on reading strategies and
metacognitive awareness.
9
Data for Goal 1
A baseline was established in October 2013 when 232 Grade 9 students
completed reading assessment tasks based on a Health and Career Education 9
(HCE 9)reading involving a situation where a student had to make a choice about
using crystal meth at a party.
October 2013 Reading Assessment Results
Comprehension
Not within Expectations
10%
Meets Expectations
26%
Fully Meets Expectations
36%
Exceeds Expectations
28%
Analysis
6%
28%
36%
30%
Synthesis
13%
36%
36%
15%
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Analysis
•
•
•
•
In the comprehension section of the test, 90% of the
students were able to present main points and
details in a list or graphic organizer.
The students showed strong skills in making
inferences in the analysis section, with 94% meeting
or exceeding expectations.
In the challenging synthesis section, students
applied information from the readings and real life
experiences to offer responses to problems; 85% of
students met or exceeded expectations.
Overall, we were impressed with how seriously the
students attended to the tasks, with many providing
authentic, thoughtful, and detailed responses. A
high number of students opted to complete an
additional non-graded feedback/ self-assessment
page.
11
To raise metacognitive awareness
In consultation with English 9 teachers, Mrs. Browne and
Ms. Ikeda met with English 9 classes before the end of
the first semester.
In groups, students examined exemplars of excellent
responses from the October
reading assessment.
In the class sharing session, students
discussed the qualities of the best
responses and how to employ reading/
test taking strategies.
12
Goals
•Affective: We wanted to praise the
students for their efforts on the first
assessment and encourage them to
approach tests with confidence.
•Achievement: We hoped that by
sharing exemplars of excellent
answers, student results might
improve in the second reading
assessment.
13
January 2014 Reading Assessment Results
Grade 9 students attended a Green Thumb Theatre production on
cyberbullying during exam week in January. As part of the followup, 239 students completed an HCE 9 reading on cyberbullying.
January 2014 Grade 9 Reading Assessment Results
Comprehension
Analysis
Not within Expectations
10.50%
7%
Meets Expectations
31%
30%
Fully Meets Expectations
23%
39%
Exceeds Expectations
35%
24%
Synthesis
14%
35%
45%
9%
14
Comparing the two reading assessments
October 2013 Reading Assessment Results
Not within Expectations
Meets Expectations (Minimal level)
Fully Meets Expectations
Exceeds Expectations
Comprehension
10%
26%
36%
28%
Analysis
6%
28%
36%
30%
Synthesis
13%
36%
36%
15%
January 2014 Grade 9 Reading Assessment Results
Not within Expectations
Meets Expectations (Minimal level)
Fully Meets Expectations
Exceeds Expectations
Comprehension
10.50%
31%
23%
35%
Analysis
7%
30%
39%
24%
•
We were pleased with the seriousness with which the students
approached the task; they had to come in during provincial exam week
specifically to participate in these HCE 9 / APL reading assessment
tasks. (Only five students were unable to attend; the HCE 9 teacher
commented that it was the best attendance ever.)
•
The students saw the value of having their assessment on a relevant
topic, connected to a thoughtful drama performance (which was a prereading activity).
•
The results remained steady across the board, with many students
attempting to use the strategies presented in their classes.
Synthesis
14%
35%
45%
9%
15
May 2014 Reading Assessment Results
Two hundred and twenty-eight Grade 9 students read an article on the
effects of stress on teenagers and how to cope with it.
May 2014 Reading Assessment Results
Not within Expectations
Meets Expectations (Minimal level)
Fully Meets Expectations
Exceeds Expectations
Comprehension
10%
33%
31%
26%
Analysis
9%
31%
41%
19%
Synthesis
8%
47%
33%
9%
16
Analysis of May Assessment
• Overall, 90% of students met, fully met, or
exceeded expectations in
comprehension, 91% in analysis, and
92% in synthesis tasks.
• Student interest in the topic and
commitment to the tasks were strong;
several students asked for a copy of the
reading text on dealing with stress
because they said they found it helpful
and relevant to their lives.
17
Comparing the three reading assessments
October 2013 Reading Assessment Results
Not within Expectations
Meets Expectations (Minimal level)
Fully Meets Expectations
Exceeds Expectations
Comprehension
10%
26%
36%
28%
Analysis
6%
28%
36%
30%
Synthesis
13%
36%
36%
15%
January 2014 Grade 9 Reading Assessment Results
Not within Expectations
Meets Expectations (Minimal level)
Fully Meets Expectations
Exceeds Expectations
Comprehension
10.50%
31%
23%
35%
Analysis
7%
30%
39%
24%
Synthesis
14%
35%
45%
9%
May 2014 Reading Assessment Results
Not within Expectations
Meets Expectations (Minimal level)
Fully Meets Expectations
Exceeds Expectations
Comprehension
10%
33%
31%
26%
Analysis
9%
31%
41%
19%
Synthesis
8%
47%
33%
9%
18
Reflections on Goals:
•
Affective: Overall, students demonstrated
positive attitudes to the reading assessments,
used strategies they had practiced in English
classes, and took time to complete the tasks
fully. We were pleased to see them approach
these tests with less apprehension.
•
Achievement: The majority of students’
results remained consistent from January to
May. We thought they might go up, but the
final overall average was the equivalent of a
“B” and the final analysis and synthesis tasks
were more demanding.
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How this will inform instruction:
•
We must teach students how to read
questions – to understand what they are being
asked to do and to structure their responses
appropriately.
•
We must continue to provide exemplars and
teach explicit reading strategies crosscurricularly.
•
We must continue to praise students for their
efforts and encourage them to approach tasks
confidently after they have practiced using
strategies.
20
Examining Students’ Over Time: Using APL 2013 Data
Data Item #1: Last Year’s Gr. 9 Reading Assessment Results
(Semester 2 – Spring 2013)
Pinetree Secondary School Reading Assessment
(May 2013)
100.0
Grade 9 students (%)
90.0
80.0
70.0
Does Not Meet Expectations
60.0
Minimally Meets Expectations
50.0
Fully Meets Expectations
40.0
Exceeds Expectations
30.0
20.0
10.0
0.0
Summarizing
Inferencing
Analyzing
Specific Trends:
53% of Gr. 9 students fully met or exceeded expectations in terms of
SUMMARIZING.
36% of Gr. 9 students fully met or exceeded expectations in terms of
making INFERENCES.
44% of Gr. 9 students fully met or exceeded expectations in terms of
making CONNECTIONS.
21
Data Item #2:
Comparing Last Year’s Grade 9 APL scores with This Year’s first
semester English 10 final marks (158 first semester Grade 10 students )
Grade 10 Final marks – blended school and provincial exam marks (Jan. 2014)
30%
25%
20%
15%
10%
5%
0%
Grade 10
Final
Marks
A
B+
B+
C+
C/C-
F
The Trends demonstrate that most students improved:
A students
36% improved
B+
84% improved
B
80% improved
C+
66% improved
11% went down
C/C-
33% improved
23% went down
F
No change
No change
22
Reflections on Learning Improvement Fund (LIF) model
in conjunction with the literacy goal, 2013-14:
LIF funds in the 2013-14 school year provided additional staffing
(i.e. a support teacher) to work with the two English 9 classes, the
composition of which included a number of identified students
who struggled with literacy skills.
•
This year’s APL results confirm that these identified students are the
lowest performing students.
•
Their results remained consistently low in all three assessments.
•
Nevertheless, the teacher who for the past few years taught a separate
designated class of identified students, believed that this year’s model
was superior. The integration of these students into a regular class
was better for both the identified students and for the teacher.
“ The affective result was positive with greater student self-awareness.
Confidence rose even if achievement was low. “
(Tanya Dissegna)
23
School Action Plan
As a result, we recommend that this LIF model continue next year:
an experienced teacher with an aptitude for working with the lowest achievers should work
with/support these students and their teachers in regular classes.
24
School Action Plan – Additional initiatives to
support literacy at Pinetree Secondary
How have we enhanced student learning and supported literacy on a school-wide level?
Drop-Everything-and-Read (D.E.A.R.)
School Administration in concert with PACK teachers encourage silent reading at least twice a
month in homeroom classes.
25
School Action Plan – Additional initiatives
to support literacy at Pinetree Secondary
How have we enhanced student learning and supported literacy across the curriculum?
Working with Planning 10 teachers on a health issues research unit, the teacher-librarian teaches Planning
10 students how to analyze internet sites critically (i.e. information literacy), summarization skills for Prezi or
powerpoint presentations, and how to use information ethically. i.e. Works Cited.
26
School Action Plan – Additional initiatives
to support literacy at Pinetree Secondary
How have we enhanced student learning and supported literacy across the curriculum?
Working with the majority of Science 9 teachers, the teacher-librarian reinforces a reading strategy with
Science 9 students using articles on current reproductive technologies. After a read-aloud, students
practice highlighting main ideas and annotating the text of their assigned articles.
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School Action Plan for next year …
To promote and support literacy at Pinetree,
we recommend the following:
•
Send a letter* before the end of the school year to parents of outgoing grade 9
students to provide an update on the strategies and skills emphasized in the
APL testing as well as encouraging parents to support their children’s summer
reading (i.e. to maintain their skills). Provide links to public library resources
and recommended titles on the Pinetree Library website.
(* Send the letter electronically if parents have provided an email address to the school.)
•
The two teachers responsible for the APL this year should meet in September
with the designated English 10 teachers for the 2014-2015 school year to
provide information about the group of students moving into grade 10 classes.
This will encourage transference and meta-cognitive awareness for students’
recognition of skills and strategies that spiral/carry-over (e.g. applying skills
practiced, following directions, being prepared, building confidence).
•
If time permits due to decreased allocated time for library, the teacher-librarian
will continue to work with grade 10 classes in Science and Social Studies - in
addition to integrating literacy skills with the HCE 9 and Planning 10 lessons.
•
APL assessment topics should be strongly linked to ILO’s in HCE 9 curriculum
and Planning 10 curriculum.
•
Re-apply for LIF support funding for teacher release-time for collaborative
meetings, assessment-design sessions, and/or attendance at external literacyrelated workshops.
Referencing practices/theory from recent research:
•
Ways to Support Thinking About Learning (Sharon Jerowski)
28
School Action Plan for next year …
How will we provide for staff development and
collaboration?
The person responsible for the APL next year will become a member of the
Pro-D Committee next year (if one exists) to ensure that literacy goals are
supported.
How will we involve parents?
To raise awareness and to increase support for the
promotion of literacy, the person responsible for the APL
next year should meet with the members of the School
Planning Council (SPC) and two Parent Advisory Councils
at Pinetree.
How will we monitor and adjust our plans?
The person responsible for the APL next year will provide
updates and opportunities for input at staff meetings and
and/or on Pro-Days.
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Contributions and Credits
•
APL Program Facilitators (Literacy)
Nancy Browne and Leslie Ikeda
•
APL (Literacy)Consultation Members
Mike Cook, Tanya Dissegna, Sue Louie, Bruce Richards
•
PSRA Administration and Invigilation
Mathematics- and Physical Education- Department
•
APL Facilitators (Social Responsibility)
Meena Dhillon and Sharon Starr
•
School Leadership Team
Program Facilitators
•
School Administration
John McCullough, Cheryl Woods, and Mike Slinger
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