DNP-Is it for me?

Report
DNP-Is it for me?
Cindy Tofthagen, PhD, ARNP, AOCNP
Assistant Professor
University of South Florida
Why the DNP?
The Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) is the highest
practice degree any nurse can achieve.
DNP programs prepare nurses with the highest level of
scientific knowledge and practice expertise to assure the
best quality of care and provide positive patient outcomes.
ADVANCED NURSING PRACTICE WILL MOVE FROM
THE MASTER’S TO THE DOCTORAL LEVEL BY 2015.
(American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 2004)
History of Doctoral Degrees in
Nursing
Research-focus
• Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)
• Doctor of Nursing Science (DNS)
• Doctor of Science in Nursing (DSN)
• Doctor of Nursing Science (DNSc)
Practice-focus
• Doctor of Nursing (ND) – no longer offered
Hybrid of research and practice focus
•
• Doctor of Nursing Practice (DrNP)
Time Line for DNP Program
Development
1960—Boston University opens 1st clinical doctorate
1979—Case Western Reserve opens 1st ND program
1999—UTHSC opens DNSc practice doctorate
2001—University of Kentucky opens First DNP
Program
2002—AACN forms practice doctorate Task Force
2003—Columbia University admits students
2004—AACN members approve DNP Position Paper
Factors Influencing Need for DNP
•
•
•
•
Expansion of Knowledge Underlying Practice
Increased Complexity of Patient Care
Major Concerns about Quality of Care and Patient Safety
Shortages of Nursing Personnel Demanding a Higher
Level of Preparation for Leaders Who Can Design and
Assess Care and Lead
• Shortages of Prepared Nursing Faculty, Leaders in
Practice, and Nurse Researchers
• Increasing Educational Expectations for the Preparation
of other Health Professionals
Contributing Factors
• IOM called attention to problems facing health care
• 1999—To Err is Human, focused on fragmented nature of
health care
• 2001—Crossing the Quality Chasm, calls for a restructuring
of healthcare
• 2003—Health Professions Education: A Bridge to Quality
call for educators to prepare health care providers
for a new type of practice as members of
interdisciplinary teams that emphasize evidence based
practice, quality improvement, and informatics
Contributing Factors
• Increasing length of Master’s Programs in Nursing
– Many 60+ hours, requiring 3 + years to complete
– didactic and clinical increased by 72 and 36 hours
respectively for NP programs between 1995--2000
– Need for additional content in informatics,
practice management, health policy, risk
management, evaluation of evidence, and
advanced diagnosis and management
Contributing Factors
• Movement of other disciplines to the doctorate (MD,
DDS, PsyD, DPT, PharmD, AudD)
• Emerging and active interdisciplinary teams
“The tipping point for me was when I was at a team
meeting and everyone there had a doctorate in their
respective fields except the nurse.”
National Academy of Sciences 2005
Report
• Focuses on Increasing the Number of Nurse Scientists
and Increasing the Number of Productive Research
Years for Nurses Prepared in PhD Programs
• Recognized a distinction between the educational needs
of nursing as a practice profession that require
practitioners with clinical expertise and nursing as an
academic discipline and science that requires
independent researchers and scientists to build the body
of knowledge
National Academy of Sciences 2005
Report
• Proposed that “The need for doctorally
prepared practitioners and clinical faculty
would be met if nursing could develop a
new non-research clinical doctorate,
similar to the M.D. and Pharm.D. in
medicine and pharmacy, respectively.”
The Mission
“Nurses prepared at the doctoral level with a blend
of clinical, organizational, economic and leadership
skills are most likely to be able to critique nursing
and other clinical scientific findings and design
programs of care delivery that are locally
acceptable, economically feasible, and which
significantly impact healthcare outcomes.”
• AACN Position Paper on the Practice Doctorate
Reasons to Consider the DNP
• Data suggest that health outcomes improve as the
educational level of nurses increases
• Surveys of graduates indicate they have acquired
new knowledge and skills that have enhanced their
practices
• Reports from employers are indicating DNP graduate
are bringing added valued to their places of
employment
DNP programs
Focus heavily on practice that is innovative and evidencebased, reflecting the application of credible research
findings.
• Advanced nursing practice is broadly defined by AACN
(2004) as: “any form of nursing intervention that
influences health care outcomes for individuals or
populations, including the direct care of individual
patients,management of care for individuals and
populations, administration of nursing and health care
organizations, and the development and implementation
of health policy (p. 2).”
Benefits of DNP programs
• development of needed advanced competencies for
increasingly complex practice, faculty, and leadership roles;
• enhanced knowledge to improve nursing practice and patient
outcomes;
• enhanced leadership skills to strengthen practice and health
care delivery;
• better match of program requirements and credits and time
with the credential
• earned;
• provision of an advanced educational credential for those who
require advanced
• practice knowledge but do not need or want a strong research
focus (e.g., practice faculty);
• • enhanced ability to attract individuals to nursing from nonnursing backgrounds; and increased supply of faculty for
practice instruction.
What Kind of People are Attracted to
the DNP?
“I have been waiting for a program like this, I am not
interested in a research career, but there is more I need
to learn to make me a better practitioner.”
What are your career goals?
Are you committed to career in
practice or community leadership?
Oriented toward improving
outcomes of care?
Will all NP’s have to get a DNP?
• Current NP’s will retain their privileges, after 2015
but all NP programs should be offered through DNP
programs.
Will faculty with DNP be eligible for
tenure?
Tenure is an institutional prerogative with two two
major considerations:
• 1.Who is eligible for tenure? If the institution tenures
holders of other professional degrees (EdD, MD,
PsyD, PharmD, JD, PTD, AudD, etc.) then DNP
graduates should also be eligible.
• 2.What are the criteria for tenure? If the institution
defines scholarly productivity broadly to include
external funding and publications other than that
associated with only NIH R--Level grants, then the
DNP graduate should be eligible.
DNP Curriculum Components
Two components:
1. DNP Essentials 1 through 8 are the foundational
outcome competencies deemed essential for all graduates
of a DNP program regardless of specialty or functional
focus.
2. Specialty competencies/content prepare the DNP
graduate for those practice and didactic learning
experiences for a particular specialty. Competencies,
content, and practical experiences needed for specific roles
in specialty areas are delineated by national specialty
nursing organizations.
Essential I: Scientific Underpinnings
for Practice
The DNP program prepares the graduate to:
1. Integrate nursing science with knowledge from ethics, the
biophysical,
psychosocial, analytical, and organizational sciences as the basis for
the highest level of nursing practice.
2. Use science-based theories and concepts to: determine the nature
and significance of health and health care delivery phenomena;
describe the actions and advanced strategies to enhance, alleviate,
and ameliorate health and health care delivery phenomena as
appropriate; and
evaluate outcomes.
3. Develop and evaluate new practice approaches based on nursing
theories and theories from other disciplines.
Essential II: Organizational and Systems Leadership for
Quality Improvement and
Systems Thinking
1. Develop and evaluate care delivery approaches that
meet current and future needs of
patient populations based on scientific findings in nursing
and other clinical sciences,
as well as organizational, political, and economic sciences.
2. Ensure accountability for quality of health care and
patient safety for populations with whom they work.
3. Develop and/or evaluate effective strategies for
managing the ethical dilemmas
inherent in patient care, the health care organization, and
research.
Essential III: Clinical Scholarship and
Analytical Methods for Evidence-Based
Practice
1. Use analytic methods to critically appraise existing literature and
other evidence to determine and implement the best evidence for
practice.
2. Design and implement processes to evaluate outcomes of practice,
practice patterns, and systems of care within a practice setting, health
care organization, or community against national benchmarks to
determine variances in practice outcomes and population trends.
3. Design, direct, and evaluate quality improvement methodologies to
promote safe, timely, effective, efficient, equitable, and patient-centered
care.
4. Apply relevant findings to develop practice guidelines and improve
practice and the practice environment.
Essential III: Clinical Scholarship and
Analytical Methods for Evidence-Based
Practice
5. Use information technology and research methods
appropriately to: collect appropriate and accurate data to
generate evidence for nursing practice inform and guide the
design of databases that generate meaningful evidence for
nursing practice analyze data from practice design evidencebased interventions predict and analyze outcomes examine
patterns of behavior and outcomes identify gaps in evidence for
practice.
6. Function as a practice specialist/consultant in collaborative
knowledge-generating research.
7. Disseminate findings from evidence-based practice and
research to improve healthcare outcomes.
Essential IV: Information
Systems/Technology and Patient Care
Technology for the
Improvement and Transformation of Health
Care
1. Design, select, use, and evaluate programs that evaluate and
monitor outcomes of care, care systems, and quality improvement
including consumer use of health care information systems.
2. Analyze and communicate critical elements necessary to the
selection, use and evaluation of health care information systems
and patient care technology.
3. Demonstrate the conceptual ability and technical skills to
develop and execute an evaluation plan involving data extraction
from practice information systems and databases.
4. Provide leadership in the evaluation and resolution of ethical and
legal issues
within healthcare systems relating to the use of information,
information
technology, communication networks, and patient care technology.
5. Evaluate consumer health information sources for accuracy,
timeliness, and appropriateness.
Essential IV: Information
Systems/Technology and Patient Care
Technology for the
Improvement and Transformation of Health
Care
1. Design, select, use, and evaluate programs that evaluate and monitor
outcomes
of care, care systems, and quality improvement including consumer use of
health care information systems.
2. Analyze and communicate critical elements necessary to the selection, use
and evaluation of health care information systems and patient care technology.
3. Demonstrate the conceptual ability and technical skills to develop and execute
an evaluation plan involving data extraction from practice information
systems and databases.
4. Provide leadership in the evaluation and resolution of ethical and legal issues
within healthcare systems relating to the use of information, information
technology, communication networks, and patient care technology.
5. Evaluate consumer health information sources for accuracy, timeliness, and
appropriateness.
Essential V: Health Care Policy for
Advocacy in Health Care
1. Critically analyze health policy proposals, health policies, and related issues from
the perspective of consumers, nursing, other health professions, and other
stakeholders in policy and public forums.
2. Demonstrate leadership in the development and implementation of institutional,
local, state, federal, and/or international health policy.
3. Influence policy makers through active participation on committees, boards, or
task forces at the institutional, local, state, regional, national, and/or international
levels to improve health care delivery and outcomes.
4. Educate others, including policy makers at all levels, regarding nursing, health
policy, and patient care outcomes.
5. Advocate for the nursing profession within the policy and healthcare communities.
6. Develop, evaluate, and provide leadership for health care policy that shapes health
care financing, regulation, and delivery.
7. Advocate for social justice, equity, and ethical policies within all healthcare
arenas.
Essential VI: Interprofessional
Collaboration for Improving Patient and
Population
Health Outcomes
• 1. Employ effective communication and collaborative skills in
the development and implementation of practice models, peer
review, practice guidelines, health policy, standards of care,
and/or other scholarly products.
• 2. Lead interprofessional teams in the analysis of complex
practice and organizational issues.
• 3. Employ consultative and leadership skills with
intraprofessional and interprofessional teams to create change
in health care and complex healthcare delivery systems.
Essential VII: Clinical Prevention and
Population Health for Improving the
Nation’s
Health
1. Analyze epidemiological, biostatistical, environmental, and
other appropriate scientific data related to individual, aggregate,
and population health.
2. Synthesize concepts, including psychosocial dimensions and
cultural diversity, related to clinical prevention and population
health in developing, implementing, and evaluating interventions
to address health promotion/disease prevention efforts, improve
health status/access patterns, and/or address gaps in care of
individuals, aggregates, or populations.
3. Evaluate care delivery models and/or strategies using concepts
related to community, environmental and occupational health, and
cultural and socioeconomic dimensions of health.
Essential VIII: Advanced Nursing
Practice
1. Conduct a comprehensive and systematic assessment of health and illness
parameters in complex situations, incorporating diverse and culturally sensitive
approaches.
2. Design, implement, and evaluate therapeutic interventions based on nursing science
and other sciences.
3. Develop and sustain therapeutic relationships and partnerships with patients
(individual, family or group) and other professionals to facilitate optimal care and patient
outcomes.
4. Demonstrate advanced levels of clinical judgment, systems thinking, and
accountability in designing, delivering, and evaluating evidence-based care to improve
patient outcomes.
5. Guide, mentor, and support other nurses to achieve excellence in nursing practice.
6. Educate and guide individuals and groups through complex health and situational
transitions.
7. Use conceptual and analytical skills in evaluating the links among practice,
organizational, population, fiscal, and policy issues.
Additional DNP education
Falls into two general categories:
1) roles that specialize as an advanced practice nurse
(APN) with a focus on care of individuals
2) roles that specialize in practice at an aggregate,
systems, or organizational level.
DNP Signature Residencies at USF
• Prepare graduates for highly specialized clinical roles
• Focus on application of new knowledge and research
findings in the clinical setting
• Maximize interprofessional training and practice
• Optimize clinical leadership and scholarship
DNP Signature Residencies at USF
• Residency placement will be dependent on the DNP
Resident’s current clinical expertise, interests and
tailored to optimize the individual’s professional and
practice goals.
•
Residency clinical hours will vary depending on the
clinical residency concentration selected and the type
and scope of embedded clinical competencies.
• DNP students may choose from traditional primary care
residencies, or one of the USF Signature Clinical
Residencies.
DNP Signature Residencies at USF
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Brain/Spinal Cord Injury and Rehabilitation
Cardiology
Cognitive Impairment
Dermatology
Endocrinology and Metabolic Disease
Gerontology/Aging
Nurse Anesthesia
Oncology
Orthopedics
Polytrauma
Psych/Mental Health
Why USF?
• The USF DNP program offers an unprecedented
opportunity to train with nationally-recognized clinical
faculty, pursue advanced specialty training in high-demand
signature clinical residencies including dermatology and
preventive cardiology and to experience state-of-the-art,
interprofessional training through advanced and high
fidelity simulation experiences. A DNP degree from USF
will allow you to expand your clinical expertise and
professional goals to excel as a practice leader!
- Frances (Rankin) Sahebzamani, PhD, ARNP, FAANP
Director, DNP Program, USF College of Nursing
Why USF?
• USF Health lives its mission of Making Life Better. We
are taking an active role in breaking through barriers of
traditional healthcare models through interprofessional
education and research involving everyone in USF
Health: Nursing, Medicine, Public Health, Physical
Therapy, and Pharmacy.”
• - Stephen Klasko, MD, MBA Senior Vice President, USF
Health Dean, Morsani College of Medicine
Program Requirements
»»Full time students can complete core and clinical
courses in 2 years
»»52 credit hours
»»Part–time plans available
»»USF allows 8 years to complete a DNP degree
»»Most USF DNP students graduate with at least one
scholarly article published!
Finish in 3 Easy Steps!
STEP 1 - Complete core and clinical courses
• Knowledge Building Core Courses: Epidemiology,
Statistics, Writing-Publication, Evidence Based Practice,
Pathophysiology, Leadership & System Analysis, Ethics,
and Health Policy Issues
• Advanced Practice Cognates: Additional courses to
allow you to tailor your DNP program to best meet your
goals.
Finish in 3 Easy Steps!
STEP 2 - Complete evidence-based projects
• The EBP project provides students with an opportunity to
demonstrate their clinical and scholarly expertise through
the development of a relevant, practice-related project to
affect change or improve outcomes in the clinical setting.
The EBP is reviewed and evaluated by an academic
committee.
Finish in 3 Easy Steps!
STEP 3 - Complete DNP residency
DNP Residencies: Residency placement will be
dependent on the DNP Resident’s current clinical expertise,
interests and tailored to optimize the individual’s
professional and practice goals. Residency clinical hours
will vary depending on the clinical residency concentration
selected and the type and scope of embedded clinical
competencies. DNP students may chose from traditional
primary care residencies, or one of the USF Signature
Clinical Residencies.

similar documents