Continuous Climb Operations

Report
B.5.3
WP85
Study Continuous Climb
Operations
Presented by:
Bill Holtzman (USA)
Member of TOC
1
B.5.3
Continuous Climb WP85
Why Continuous Climb?
2
B.5.3
Continuous Climb WP85
Current Operations
3
B.5.3
Continuous Climb WP85
Continuous Climb
4
B.5.3
Continuous Climb WP85
Sample RNAV SID
5
B.5.3
Continuous Climb WP85
Vertical Profile
6
B.5.3
Continuous Climb WP85
How does it affect ATC?
Complexity is Bad!
Good!
• Goodbye
K-I-S-S
Multiple restrictions
in one
clearance compliance is
• Monitoring
• difficult
Reduced transmissions
• Intervention
difficult
Potential de-confliction
of
airspace
• Situational
awareness can
• suffer
Less chances for readback
errors
7
B.5.3
Continuous Climb WP85
MITRE Study, 2008
8
B.5.3
Continuous Climb WP85
MITRE Conclusion
1. For 35 US Airports, savings of 380
million USD in fuel:
• 90% from savings during arrival
• 10% during departure
2. Reduction of 850,000 metric tons CO2
3. Reduction of 216 metric tons SOX
9
B.5.3
Continuous Climb WP85
Dallas Study, 2010
3800 departures studied over 9 days:
• 20% leveled off at 10,000 ft
• Average level-off lasted 1.7 minutes
• Average fuel savings for all departure
aircraft with continuous descent was 7
gallons out of 450
• For continuous descent, savings was 50
gallons out of 300
10
B.5.3
Continuous Climb WP85
IFATCA CDO Policy (1)
IFATCA defines Continuous Descent Operations
as:
Continuous Descent Operations (CDO) are
aircraft operating techniques facilitated by
appropriate airspace and procedure design
which meet all ATM requirements, allowing the
execution of an optimized descent profile.
11
B.5.3
Continuous Climb WP85
IFATCA CDO Policy (2)
IFATCA supports the development and
implementation of Continuous Descent
Operations provided that:
• Controllers are involved in the design.
• Airspace is suited to the design.
• The design meets the desired ATM capacity.
• Tactical ATC interventions are allowed.
• Flight predictability is increased for both
pilots and controllers.
• Controller workload is not increased beyond
an acceptable level.
12
B.5.3
Continuous Climb WP85
IFATCA CDO Policy (3)
Doc 9931 should be amended as follows:
• Incorporate CDA design practices learned by
the pioneers of continuous descent, including
the 90% rule, the use of extensive simulation
and the need for automated wind data and
advanced sequencing tools.
• More precisely refer to those procedures it
aims to regulate as either Continuous Descent
Arrivals (CDAs) or Optimized Profile Descents
(OPDs).
13
B.5.3
Continuous Climb WP85
De-confliction of Airspace
• Build routes whose vertical profiles
remain clear of each other
• Aircraft are “route separated” or
“sterile” – conflictions impossible!
• Wasteful and inefficient
o Daily demands change
o Much airspace unused
o Degrades benefits of continuous ops
De-confliction useful as starting point.
14
B.5.3
Continuous Climb WP85
Procedure Design
Need to balance:
• Aircraft need for altitude range to
adjust trajectory
• Controller need to limit altitude range
to make room for other aircraft
• Daily traffic cycle, seasonal changes
and varying trends over time
• Competition between routes for larger
vertical envelopes
15
B.5.3
Continuous Climb WP85
Dual departure operations
16
B.5.3
Continuous Climb WP85
ICAO Manual
Need to balance:
• Aircraft need for altitude range to
adjust trajectory
• Controller need to limit altitude range
to make room for other aircraft
• Daily traffic cycle, seasonal changes
and varying trends over time
17
B.5.3
Continuous Climb WP85
Conclusions
1.
2.
3.
Continuous climb departures are considered by the
industry as an important element of future ATM.
Continuous climb operations do not represent the
same potential benefits as continuous descent because
departure procedures are generally fairly efficient.
For the same route, continuous climb can provide the
following benefits in comparison to step climbs:
• Reduced fuel burn
• Shorter flight times
• Reduced emissions
• Reduced noise
• Reduced number of ATC clearances
18
B.5.3
Continuous Climb WP85
Conclusions
4.
Generally, there will be a tradeoff between optimizing
continuous climb operations and optimizing continuous
descent operations. However, in some cases
continuous climb operations can enable the
implementation of continuous descent operations.
5. Continuous climb operations can provide controllers
with an important advantage. They can be used to
issue complex, multi-restriction clearances easily and
quickly.
6. There are potential problems with the use of
continuous climb:
•
Complexity of procedures generally increases risk.
•
Compliance with the vertical profile of a CCO is
more difficult to monitor.
•
Distinguishing which aircraft have been cleared to
fly the vertical profile or not could be difficult.
19
B.5.3
Continuous Climb WP85
Conclusions
7. Effective design of continuous climb procedures
provides some level of de-confliction with other
traffic flows.
8. The “90% Rule” recommended for use in design
of continuous descent procedures is not
appropriate for continuous climb because of the
wide range of climb performance.
9. IFATCA policy on continuous descent operations is
also relevant on continuous climb operations.
20
B.5.3
Continuous Climb WP85
Questions?
21
B.5.3
Continuous Climb WP85
Recommendations
4.1 - IFATCA Policy is:
IFATCA defines Continuous Climb
Operations as:
Continuous Climb Operations (CCO) are
aircraft operating techniques facilitated by
appropriate airspace and procedure design
which meet all ATM requirements, allowing
the execution of an optimized climb
profile.
and is included in the IFATCA Technical and
Professional Manual.
22
B.5.3
Continuous Climb WP85
Recommendations
4.2 - IFATCA Policy is:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
IFATCA supports the development and
implementation of Continuous Descent Operations
and Continuous Climb Operations provided that:
Controllers are involved in the design.
Airspace is suited to the design.
The design meets the desired ATM capacity.
Tactical interventions are always possible.
Flight predictability is increased for both pilots and
controllers.
Controller workload is not increased beyond an
acceptable level.
It increases the overall performance of the ATM
system without reducing safety.
and is included in the IFATCA Technical and
Professional Manual.
23
B.5.3
Continuous Climb WP85
NATCA Comments on Draft
ICAO CCO Manual
 CCO designs should not require
intervention under routine conditions.
 Mixed mode operations - undesirable.
 Procedures should encourage users to
invest in advanced avionics.
 Dual departure route concept has
potential but is unproven.
 CCO Manual should not encourage use
of shortcuts.
24

similar documents