Blended learning is early stage

Report
Excerpts from Blended Learning
Data Accumulation Report
By Marina Ballantyne Walne, Ph.D.
with support from Heather Staker and Mukta Pandit
Presented July 2013
“In a new World of Learning, education centers on the
needs of learners, not those of institutions.
Teaching is tailored to an individual student’s needs and abilities.”
“2020 Forecast,” KnowledgeWorks
1
Key Findings
 Blended learning is early stage; roughly 3.5 million students
take part, and 4 overarching models are emerging.
 Most key design and implementation factors are the same
for any good school; however, a good learning
management system is essential.
 There is early evidence of cost savings.
 Student gains are promising but results are inconclusive.
 Blended learning may change teachers roles and help
attract, retain, and leverage the best, but it may also reduce
the number of teachers needed in a school.
 Get into blended learning for the right reasons.
2
Key Findings
 Blended learning is early stage; roughly 3.5 million students
take part, and 4 overarching models are emerging.
 Most key design and implementation factors are the same
for any good school; however, a good learning
management system is essential.
 There is early evidence of cost savings.
 Student gains are promising but results are inconclusive.
 Blended learning may change teachers roles and help
attract, retain, and leverage the best, but it may also reduce
the number of teachers needed in a school.
 Get into blended learning for the right reasons.
3
Definition of Blended Learning
A formal education program in which a
student learns at least in part through
online delivery of content and instruction,
with some element of student control over
time, place, path and/or pace
and
at least in part in a supervised brick-andmortar location away from home.
and
the modalities along each student’s learning path within a
course or subject are connected to provide an integrated
learning experience ( Clayton Christensen Institute)
Source: Heather Staker and Michael B. Horn, “Classifying K-12 blended learning,” Innosight Institute, May 2012
4
Blended Learning is NOT …
The traditional “factory” model
50 million in monolithic, one-size-fits-all batches
Full-time online learning
Only about 250,000 U.S. students are full timers
The “tech-rich” traditional model
Over $60 billion spent on computers in classrooms
5
Emerging Blended Learning Models
Source: Heather Staker and Michael B. Horn, “Classifying K-12 blended learning,” Innosight Institute, May 2012
6
Definitions of the Big Four
Rotation
Flex
Self-Blend
Enriched Virtual
Students rotate on
a fixed schedule or
at the teacher’s
discretion
between learning
modalities, at least
one of which is
online learning
Students move on
an individually
customized, fluid
schedule among
modalities, and
the teacher-ofrecord is on-site
Students attend
physical school
plus take 1 or
more courses
online with off-site
teacher of record
Students divide
their time between
attending a
physical campus
and learning
remotely using
online delivery
Source: Heather Staker and Michael B. Horn, “Classifying K-12 blended learning,” Innosight Institute, May 2012
7
Station-Rotation Model:
KIPP LA, Empower Academy
Individualized
Online
Instruction
Teacher-led
Instruction
T
Collaborative
Activities &
Stations
Source: Heather Staker and Michael B. Horn, “Classifying K-12 blended learning,” Innosight Institute, May 2012
8
Budget and Teacher Shortages are
Driving Growth of Blended Learning
Opportunity
•
Expert teachers can reach
more students
Example
Miami-Dade Public Schools uses Florida Virtual School
(FLVS) online teachers to deliver courses where local
content experts are unavailable. Local teachers provide
support.
•
classroom
classroom
classroom
classroom
teacher
•
Class sizes can increase at
the same time that
teachers get more smallgroup time
KIPP Empower Academy increased class size from 20:1
to 28:1 but offers more small-group instruction
•
Station 1
•
Students can get more
guided practice and tutoring
without extra cost
•
Station 2
Hundreds of students get Khan online instruction at night
and then face-to-face help at school
Online instruction
at home
Face-to-face
guided practice
9
Key Findings
 Blended learning is early stage; roughly 3.5 million students
take part, and 4 overarching models are emerging.
 Most key design and implementation factors are the same
for any good school; however, a good learning
management system is essential.
 There is early evidence of cost savings.
 Student gains are promising but results are inconclusive.
 Blended learning may change teachers roles and help
attract, retain, and leverage the best, but it may also reduce
the number of teachers needed in a school.
 Get into blended learning for the right reasons.
10
Key Factors
1. Data analysis to differentiate instruction
 Most success factors are
the same for blended and
traditional schools
2. School culture
3. Leadership
4. Learning Management System (LMS)
5. Clear instructional design and plan
6. Advocates from within
 A majority of respondents
(58%) cited data analysis
and the ability to use data
to differentiate instruction
as the most important
design principle for
blended schools.
7. Quality teachers and Professional Development (PD)
8. Engaging digital content for multiple ages
9. Technology infrastructure
Source: Based on open ended interviews with 12 leaders in the field. 11
What is a Learning Management
System (LMS)?
A Learning Management System is a technology toolkit that can enable
more effective teaching and learning.
One of the critical issues with
a learning management
system is relying on the
quality of information from the
courseware vendor. The
vendor’s assessment of
mastery may not match the
level of rigor set by a school.
Therefore, the teachers do not
trust the data coming from the
system.
--- Marcia Aaron, KIPP
Empower
Source: Safal Partners
12
How does an LMS Enable Blended
Learning?
TEACHERS
• Create, maintain, share and manage the learning experience
through one easy-to-use website
• Easily integrate the online and offline learning experience
• Use online collaboration tools to create a virtual classroom
• Track student performance and deliver targeted feedback and
content
• Manage administrative tasks like putting up grades, distributing
materials etc. easily
• Get feedback and data on student performance, allowing datadriven modifications to curriculum
STUDENTS
• Access content anytime and anywhere
• Learn collaboratively by creating online study groups
• Access content tailored to preferred mode of learning
Source: Safal Partners
13
Adaptive Learning through an LMS
CONTENT
ADAPTIVE LEARNING
Process managed by the LMS
Initial diagnostics
Adaptive and
interactive
curricula and
assessments
(mapped to
standards)
Content delivery based on
diagnostic results
Progress monitoring assessments
to assess learning
Content delivery based on
assessment
Outcome assessments
Source: Safal Partners
14
Key Findings
 Blended learning is early stage; roughly 3.5 million students
take part, and 4 overarching models are emerging.
 Most key design and implementation factors are the same
for any good school; however, a good learning
management system is essential.
 There is early evidence of cost savings.
 Student gains are promising but results are inconclusive.
 Blended learning may change teachers roles and help
attract, retain, and leverage the best, but it may also reduce
the number of teachers needed in a school.
 Get into blended learning for the right reasons.
15
Comparison of Per-pupil Expenditures
by School Type
Estimated Per-Pupil Expenditures
On average, a
blended model costs
roughly $1.1K less per
student than a
traditional model, but
the variance is wide
12,000
10,000
$10.0K
Student Support
$8.9K
Student Support
8,000
School Operations
School Operations
$6.4K
Content Acquisition
Technology & Infrastructure
6,000
Content Acquisition
Student Support
School Operations
4,000
Technology & Infrastructure
Labor
Labor
Content Acquisition
Student Support
School Operations
Technology and Infrastructure
Content Acquisition
Labor
2,000
Labor
0
Traditional Model
N/A
Blended Model
+/-15%
Fully Virtual Model
+/-20%
Source: Parthenon
16
Cost Savings Examples
School
Cost Savings
Carpe Diem
Cost is $5,300 per student for operations; $6,000 per student
including mortgage for facilities
Alliance
Each blended school saves about $1 million over a 4-year
period of implementation with the 48 to 1 teacher student
ratio.
Rocketship
Each school saves about $500,000 per year. This is
redeployed in the following manner: $200,000 to higher
teacher salaries ( 20% more); $100,000 for academic dean;
$200,000 management fee for Rocketship to cover
leadership development, general growth, and facility
improvements. Their buildings have 5,000 square feet less
than a traditional school due to fewer classrooms, which
also represents a savings. All Rocketship schools operate
within ADA.
17
Key Findings
 Blended learning is early stage; roughly 3.5 million students
take part, and 4 overarching models are emerging.
 Most key design and implementation factors are the same
for any good school; however, a good learning
management system is essential.
 There is early evidence of cost savings.
 Student gains are promising but results are inconclusive.
 Blended learning may change teachers roles and help
attract, retain, and leverage the best, but it may also reduce
the number of teachers needed in a school.
 Get into blended learning for the right reasons.
18
Summary of Data from National Study
of Online Learning
 Meta-analysis of 176 experimental or quasi-experimental
studies found that, on average, students in online learning
performed modestly better that those receiving face-to-face
instruction.
 Differences were larger in those studies that blended online
with face-to-face versus online alone.
 Only 7 studies involved K-12 students; number of studies was
too small to warrant much confidence in the mean effects.
Sources: Evaluation of Evidence-Based Practices in Online Learning, U.S. DOE
19
2012 or 2013 Sample Results
 In 2012, 82% of Rocketship students scored proficient or
advanced in math, on par with affluent districts at 87%
 Summit Prep is ranked 36th for AP results among the 23,000
public high schools in the U.S.
 In 2013, second grade students at KIPP Empower, LA, scored
991 out of a possible 1,000 points on the CA Academic
Performance Index (API). Only 9% of these students were
developmentally ready on a literacy screen in grade K.
 Carpe Diem’s middle school students in Indiana showed an
average of 3 years of academic growth in 2012-2013.
20
2011 Rocketship Results
900
863
803
800
860
859
808
773
769
758
756
CA API
Results 700
600
500
Rockesthip
Nearby
districts*
Overall
CA
Rockesthip
Nearby
districts*
Low-Income
CA
Rockesthip
Nearby
districts*
CA
English Learners
*Nearby districts include aggregate average of elementary schools in
Alum Rock Unified, San Jose Unified and Franklin –McKinley school districts..
Source: Rocketship Presentation
21
2011 Carpe Diem, AZ Results
%
Economically
Disadvantaged
%
Proficient
%
Proficient
%
Advanced
%
Advanced
Reading
Math
Reading
Math
Carpe Diem
55%
93%
87%
24%
48%
Comparison
~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~
Region
68%
54%
36%
3%
9%
State
51%
57%
32%
6%
11%
Yuma HS
66%
54%
40%
4%
5%
Crane MS
70%
76%
62%
10%
24%
Source: Arizona State Accountability
22
Student Outcomes: Non-Academic
 Increased student engagement
 Increased motivation
 Decrease in behavioral issues because students feel trusted
 No significant differences in student social skills and interactions
Sources: Interviews with school operators
23
Key Findings
 Blended learning is early stage; roughly 3.5 million students
take part, and 4 overarching models are emerging.
 Most key design and implementation factors are the same
for any good school; however, a good learning
management system is essential.
 There is early evidence of cost savings.
 Student gains are promising but results are inconclusive.
 Blended learning may change teachers roles and help
attract, retain, and leverage the best, but it may also reduce
the number of teachers needed in a school.
 Get into blended learning for the right reasons.
24
Potential Impact on Teachers
 Attract, retain and leverage the best: potentially higher salaries;
reduction in menial tasks; better student achievement results; best
teachers leveraged to “boundless classrooms” and can become
specialized experts.
 Boost average teacher’s effectiveness: smart-ware delivers much of
instruction, allowing more time for teachers’ strategic intervention; can
get real time data and lesson planning advice.
 Higher student-teacher ratios may decrease the number of classroom
teachers needed.
 Diversify instructional delivery by adding new professional roles:
technology experts, lab facilitators, interventionists, tutors, etc.
25
Teacher Satisfaction
KIPP Empower
Matchbook Learning
KIPP Foundation conducts a
national survey and the KIPP
Empower School received
the second highest
Matchbook Learning
surveyed its teachers at L.A.
Holmes in Detroit and 100%
teacher satisfaction rating
among 102 schools in the
KIPP network.
said they would not go
back to the time before
the school was blended.
This was a turnaround school
that retained all of its
existing teachers.
26
Teacher and Leadership Training
School Developed
Leadership Training
School Developed
Teacher Training
(Rocketship)
(Alliance, Rocketship)
Consultant created
Professional
Development on
Blended Learning
Content and LMS
Vendor Training
University Training –
Emerging Partnerships
(Alvo Institute)
27
Key Findings
 Blended learning is early stage; roughly 3 million students
take part, and 4 overarching models are emerging.
 Most key design and implementation factors are the same
for any good school; however, a good learning
management system is essential.
 There is early evidence of cost savings.
 Student gains are promising but results are inconclusive.
 Blended learning may change teachers roles and help
attract, retain, and leverage the best, but it may also reduce
the number of teachers needed in a school.
 Get into blended learning for the right reasons.
28
Key Takeaways from Vendors,
Funders and Board Members
Funder or Vendor
Key Lessons Learned
Alex Hernandez,
Charter School
Fund
“We need to realize that technology won’t make up for poor
human capital – that is still an essential part of the equation.”
Rebecca Tomassi,
Alvo Institute
“We are big believers that attitudes and perceptions around
technology and data tools are very important – we are looking
for a collective, collaborative approach to instruction.”
Anthony Kim, Ed
Elements
“Leadership is important – but it is critical in any school. Leaders
need to realize that what you are doing in a conversion to
blended learning is change management.”
Frank Baxter,
Chair of Alliance
“I came to the realization that although we were quite successful
as a CMO, what we were doing was neither scalable nor could
lead to rapid growth. We went to blended learning for the
economics – more productivity; for the principle that you never
want a person to do a job a machine can do; and to reach our
goal of every student in the nation having a great education.”
Source: Interviews vendors, board members, and funders
29
Lessons Learned from Current
Blended Learning Operators
Blended Learning
School
Key Lessons Learned
KIPP Empower
“Our biggest “Aha” was about the program – we did not think
about the back end (data aggregation piece) – we thought
about the front end – curricula and programs.”
Carpe Diem
“Culture, culture, culture is the key to success.”
Alliance ATAMS
“You need to believe that this is the best thing for kids and keep
the core values and mastery learning as a focus.”
A. L. Holmes
School, Matchbox
“We are using technology to help mediocre teachers become
high performing. That’s our fundamental thesis.”
Rocketship
“Some people when they get into this space just focus on
technology. This is a big mistake. Blended learning is about taking
kids from where they are and figuring out what they need to do
to learn. Technology is an efficient way to do that.”
Source: Interviews school operators
30
The Power of Learning Lab
5
In class,
teachers focus
on critical skills
1
Introduce
Concepts
In class, teachers
introduce new topics
and conduct guided
discussions
Guided
Practice
Extend
Individualized
Learning
Intervene
4
Response to
Intervention RTI:
tutors provide
intensive,
focused
remedial work
with students
Independent
Practice
Assess
3
Frequent assessments give early,
actionable insights into students’
strengths & weaknesses
2
In Learning Lab,
students strengthen
basic skills via
computer programs
Source: Rocketship Education
The Big Aha
Blended Learning is PROMISING because it can
 Deliver CONSISTENT, ENGAGING quality digital content
through the learning management system
 Completely INDIVIDUALIZE a student’s instructional
experience in a way one teacher with 25 to 30 students
never could
And if teachers are paid 20% more due to cost savings
and relieved of burdensome tasks, it has the potential to
 Attract, retain and leverage the best and brightest
teachers
32

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