printable version - Environment, Health and Safety

Report
ONLINE SELF-STUDY
Shipping with Dry Ice
Introduction

The Department of Transportation considers dry ice to be a
hazardous material when shipped in commerce. Anyone who
prepares a package containing dry ice must be trained and verified
through testing on the applicable regulations for shipping dry ice.
After completing this training module and successfully passing the
10 question post test you will receive a certificate and be legally
certified to ship packages that contain dry ice.

This training is valid for two years. After two years if you wish to
continue shipping packages containing dry ice you must complete
this training again to be legally certified to do so.
Introduction

This module fulfills the training requirements for dry ice only.

Federal law requires training specific to all hazardous items
included in a package. If the items you wish to ship on dry ice are
considered hazardous (for example hazardous chemicals or
infectious substances) you must either complete the Shipping
Infectious Substances and Other Biomedical Materials training
module or contact EHS for training specific to your items.

Contact EHS for help determining if your items are considered
hazardous materials for shipping purposes.

If you have completed the Shipping Infectious Substances and
Other Biomedical Materials training within the last 2 years you are
already certified to ship items using dry ice for as long as your
certificate from that training is valid.
Course Objectives
The purpose of this training module is to:

Ensure the safe handling of dry ice using good sensible practices.

Comply with Federal and International regulations for packing,
labeling, and documenting shipments containing dry ice.
Course Objectives

This training will increase your awareness of safety and compliance issues. If you need more
information or help with shipping your package you can e-mail the EHS Shipping Specialist.
The training will cover the topics listed below. Classification, packaging, and marking and
labeling are the three most important topics covered.

Regulatory Oversight

Hazardous Materials Definition

Training Requirements

Penalties

Classification and Identification

Packaging

Marking & labeling packages

Documentation

Record Keeping

Emergency Response

Security Plan
Regulatory Oversight
Federal Regulations:
U.S. Dept. of Transportation (DOT) – 49 CFR
Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)
The DOT is the federal agency in charge of hazardous material
shipments in commerce. The FAA is a division within the DOT that
enforces hazardous material regulations on packages shipped via
air carrier. Unless you are using a specific ground only service (i.e.:
FedEx Ground) your dangerous goods packages will fall under the
FAA’s jurisdiction. If you are using a ground only carrier contact
EHS for further instruction as ground regulations differ slightly than
those for air shipments.
Regulatory Oversight
International Regulations (Air shipments)
International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO)
International Air Transport Association (IATA)
Dangerous Goods Regulations (DGR)
For the international standard a UN Committee of Experts develops
recommended procedures for the transport of all hazardous materials
except radioactive material. The International Civil Aviation Organization
(ICAO) uses the UN recommendations as the basis for developing the
regulations for the safe transport of hazardous materials by air. The
International Air Transport Association (IATA) is the international trade
organization that interprets ICAO regulations and publishes the
Dangerous Goods Regulations (DGR), a user’s manual for the ICAO
regulations. The IATA regulations are more stringent than DOT. This
training module follows IATA regulations. IATA regulations are minimal
requirements - your carrier can be more stringent.
What is a Hazardous Material?


The DOT defines a hazardous material as:
“Any substance or material that the Secretary of Transportation has
determined to be capable of causing an unreasonable risk to health,
safety, and property when transported in commerce”
What is a Hazardous Material?

There are nine classes of hazardous materials defined by the DOT
and IATA:

1: Explosives

2: Compressed Gas

3: Flammable Liquids

4: Flammable Solids

5: Oxidizing Substances

6: Toxic or Infectious Substances

7: Radioactive Materials

8: Corrosive Materials

9: Miscellaneous Hazards
Dry Ice is a Class 9 Miscellaneous Hazard
Training Requirements

Any person who prepares a hazardous material for transportation in
commerce must be trained and tested on the subjects below as
they apply to the item they are preparing:
 General Awareness – recognizing dangerous goods
 Function Specific – how to pack, label and document your items
 Safety Training – understanding the hazards associated with
your items
 Security Awareness – understanding the security risks
associated with transporting your items
 In-depth security training – specific security procedures followed
in your work environment
Penalties
Oxygen-generating canister like the ones on
board the ValuJet flight 592 in 1996.
"Violations contrary to the U.S. Code of Federal
Regulations (CFR) 49, if substantiated, may
result in the assessment of a civil penalty of up
to $37,500 per violation, and deliberate
violations may result in criminal prosecution of
up to $500,000 and 5 years in prison."

There has been an increase in the number of
Federal Aviation Inspections (FAA) in response
to the 1996 ValuJet crash, the September 11,
2001 attacks, and the UPS package bomb
scare in November 2010.

If you are receiving a HazMat package it is
your responsibility to ensure the sender
packages it correctly.

The FAA randomly inspects several labs at
UNC every year. The primary focus of these
inspections is to check for proper shipping
training and adequate hazardous material
shipment records.
Identification and Classification

Dry Ice is a Class 9 Miscellaneous Hazard. It is considered a
hazardous material for the following reasons:
 Explosion Hazard: dry ice releases large volumes of CO2 gas as
it sublimates. If it is kept in an air tight container the pressure
may cause a violent rupture.
 Suffocation Hazard: dry ice can create an oxygen deficient
environment if stored in an area with poor ventilation.
 Contact Hazard: dry ice’s low temperature can cause burns
similar to frostbite on human skin.
MSDS for Dry Ice:
http://www.airgas.com/documents/pdf/001091.pdf
Packaging

To prevent an unintentional release or exposure, dry ice must be
packaged as follows:
 In a container with sufficient insulation to not be adversely
affected by the cold temperature.
 In a hard walled container that will hold up to bumps, shocks,
and drops and be resistant to punctures.
Note: Styrofoam coolers by themselves do not constitute a
sufficient hard walled container. Styrofoam coolers must be
placed inside a hard walled outer container such as a cardboard
box.
Packaging
An insulated container not
adversely affected by dry ice
temperature.
(NOT sufficient packaging by itself).
An insulated container not
adversely affected by dry
ice temperature inside of a
hard walled container.
(Sufficient packaging)
Packaging

Secure your items inside the package so that they will not move
around if the dry ice sublimates completely. Foam bracings,
packing peanuts, crumbled newspaper, and bubble wrap are a few
options. Another option is to tape your item to an inside wall of the
package.

To make the dry ice last longer fill any empty space inside the box
with crumbled paper or packing peanuts.

The maximum amount of dry ice allowed in a single container is 200
kg.
Packaging

A package containing dry ice must permit the release of CO2
vapors. Failure to do so can result in a violent rupture.

To ensure vapors can escape, do not seal the lid of the inner
Styrofoam container.

Tape only the center where the flaps meet on top of the box.
Marking and Labeling

Every package containing dry ice must have a Class 9
Miscellaneous hazard label (minimum size 4 in x 4 in):
For a .pdf version of this label go here:
http://ehs.unc.edu/ih/lab/docs/dry_ice.pdf
Note: Labels must be weather resistant. If
you use the paper label in the link above be
sure to completely cover it with clear packing
tape when you attach it to the box.
Effective October 1, 2014
Per the DOT regulations, Class 9 hazard labels with the horizontal line
the will no longer be accepted.
Marking and Labeling

Every dry ice package must have one of the following markings adjacent
to the Class 9 label:
Carbon dioxide, solid, UN1845 (net weight of dry ice)KG
Or
Dry Ice, UN1845 __(net weight of dry ice )_ KG
Marking and Labeling

Every dry ice package must display the name, address, and phone
number of both the sender and receiver of the package.

Use arrows on two opposite
sides to indicate the proper
package orientation (only
required for liquid items).
Marking and Labeling

The class 9 label, sender and receiver information, and Dry Ice,
UN1845 ___ kg markings should be on the same vertical side of the
box.

Do not put these markings on the top or bottom of the package.

The label must not overlap other required markings and must not
wrap around to another side of the box (any portion of the label).
Label must not cover any required
markings
Label must not wrap around to
another side of the box
Documentation

You must indicate on the air waybill / shipping paper that your
package contains dry ice. For most carriers this involves simply
checking a box and entering the net weight of the dry ice.
Documentation

If you are filling out a shipping paper without a dry ice check box you
need to write the following in the Description of Goods section:
Dry Ice,9,UN1845 (# of packages) x_(net weight in kg)

If you are unsure check with the carrier or contact EHS to determine if
you have marked the shipping paper correctly.
Record Keeping

Keep a record of all shipments from your facility for 2 years
(domestic shipments) or 5 years (international shipments).

Records should include at minimum a copy of the air
waybill/shipping paper, a list of package contents, and a note of who
prepared the package if it is different than the name on the shipping
paper.

International shipments must include copies of all paperwork
associated with the shipment including commercial invoices and
other customs documentation.
Emergency Response

Review your lab safety plan and the EHS lab safety manual
(http://ehs.unc.edu/manuals/laboratory/) for safety information
specific to your lab.

Never touch pellets or blocks of dry ice bare handed. Use gloves or
mechanical means (scoop, broom and pan) to clean up spilled or
dropped dry ice.

Never store dry ice in a poorly ventilated room as this will create an
oxygen deficient environment.

Never store dry ice in an air tight container as this will create an
explosion hazard.
Emergency Response
Important points to consider when receiving a damaged shipment
How do you know that a package contains hazardous materials? Look
for the red hatch marks on paperwork, UN # and diamond shaped
labels on box.

A damaged package may be crushed or leaking.

Do not sign for packages without seeing them

Inspect package before signing

Do not accept a package that is damaged

Packages are the responsibility of the Shipper until accepted by
recipient

If the package is damaged or leaking offer assistance in cleaning up
the spill (call EHS). The carrier should be prepared to deal with the
spill.
Emergency Response
Emergency Response for Damaged Package or Spill on Campus

In a laboratory setting it is expected that staff are prepared to cope
with a spill.

All labs should have an emergency spill kit on hand and train all
personnel in appropriate emergency response.

Isolate spill or leak area immediately in all directions.

Keep unauthorized personnel away.

Obtain the identity of the substance involved if possible and report
spill to appropriate authorities.

Do not touch or walk through spilled material.

Do not touch damaged containers or spilled material unless wearing
appropriate protective clothing.
If you need to, call EHS (962 - 5507) to help with spill clean up.
Emergency Response
Emergency Response for Damaged Package or Spill on
Campus

Be very careful to avoid contact with broken glass or sharp objects
that may cause cuts or abrasions that could significantly increase
the risk of exposure.

Damaged packages containing dry ice as a refrigerant may produce
water or frost from condensation of air. Do not touch this liquid as it
could be contaminated by the contents of the package.
Emergency Response
Emergency Response for Damaged Package or Spill on Campus

Absorb spilled materials with earth, sand or other non-combustible
material while avoiding direct contact.

Evaluate potential personal exposure.

Contact UNC Employee Occupational Health Clinic (966-9119) for
post exposure follow-up.
Security Plan

If you ship dangerous goods you should adopt, implement and
comply with a security plan that addresses the elements specified in
section 1.6.3.2 of the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations

Labs need to take specific action in order to provide security against
theft of highly hazardous materials, and to ensure compliance with
new regulations.

EHS urges each lab/clinic to review and develop procedures to
ensure the security of hazardous materials in your area.
Security Plan

You may already implement the necessary security measures such
as:
 Locking up controlled substances, syringes, and needles
 Securing radioactive material

An easy way to increase laboratory security is to lock the lab
whenever it is left unattended

Keep records of hazardous materials or types of hazardsou
materials transported

Review how you store your hazardous materials

Put in place procedures for reporting and dealing with security
threats, breaches of security, or security incidents
Security Plan

You should control access to areas where hazardous chemicals are
used and stored.

Lock freezers, refrigerators where biological agents, hazardous
chemicals or radioactive materials are stored in common areas.

Approach anyone you don't recognize who appear to be wandering
in lab areas.

Assign security responsibility to one employee in your lab. Give
them appropriate authority to carry out their responsibilities.
Security Plan

Use a log book to sign highly hazardous materials in and out of
secure storage.

Take a periodic inventory of highly hazardous chemicals, biological
agents/toxins, radioactive material and controlled substances.
 This could be as simple as frequently looking at your chemical
containers to make sure none are missing.

Track the use and disposal of hazardous materials. Report any
missing inventory to Public Safety or EHS.

Know what materials are being ordered and being brought into the
laboratory.

Consider having all lab staff wear identification badges.
Additional Resources

Contacts for Dry Ice packaging materials

SAF-T-PAK
Edmonton, Alberto, Canada
800-814-7480
www.saftpak.com

CARGOpak, Corp.
Raleigh, NC
800-266-0652
www.cargopak.com

Fisher Scientific
800-766-7000
www.fishersci.com

Additional shipping resources at UNC-Chapel Hill:

UNC EHS Shipping web page: http://ehs.unc.edu/ih/lab/shipping.shtml

UNC Export Control web page:
http://www.unc.edu/campus/Export_Control/index.html
Checklist for shipments containing
dry ice
_____ Total quantity per package is 200 kg or less
_____ Package in contact with dry ice is sufficiently insulated
_____ outer package is hard walled (ie: cardboard not styrofoam)
_____ Package is vented or able to permit release of Carbon Dioxide gas
and to prevent pressure build up
_____ Material inside the outer package is secured so that it will not shift once
dry ice dissipates
_____ Outside of box marked UN1845, Carbon dioxide, solid and Net
Weight of dry ice
_____ Class 9 label on outside of box
_____ name address and phone number of sender and receiver on the outside
of the box
If the material you are shipping qualifies as a dangerous good you must meet the
packing requirements for that item IN ADDITION to these requirements for dry
Summary


This training certifies you to ship non-hazardous items on dry ice. If the
item you wish to ship is considered hazardous contact EHS for further
instruction.
Dry ice may present an explosion, suffocation, or burn hazard – use
caution when handling dry ice and always do so in a well ventilated area.
Never store dry ice in an air tight container.

Protect yourself, your coworkers, and the public by following the
procedures in this training for shipping packages containing dry ice.

Hazard communication is fundamental (proper labeling and
documentation)

Contact your carrier for specific information regarding shipping packages
with dry ice. All destinations may not be served.

When in doubt ask for assistance - Call EHS (962 – 5507)
In order to receive credit for this training, you must complete the post-test

similar documents