Quality of working life

Report
Quality of Working Life –
what, how and why
Quality of working life –
what, how and why
Mr Simon Easton & Dr Darren Van Laar,
Applied Psychology Unit
Department of Psychology, University of Portsmouth
www.port.ac.uk
1
Quality of Working Life –
what, how and why
Career choice
Stress management
Career change
www.port.ac.uk
Quality of
Working
Life
Quality of Working Life –
what, how and why
“Without doubt, the most important determinant of
QWL is career achievement, followed by career
satisfaction and career balance.”
Rose R C, Beh L, Uli J and Idris K (2006) Quality
Of Work Life: Implications Of Career
Dimensions. Journal of Social Sciences 2 (2):
61-67
www.port.ac.uk
Quality of Working Life –
what, how and why
What?
A review of the literature reveals relatively little
on quality of working life.
www.port.ac.uk
Quality of Working Life –
what, how and why
What?
A review of the literature reveals relatively little
on quality of working life.
Where quality of working life has been explored,
writers differ in their views on the core
constituents.
Taillefer,-Marie-Christine; Dupuis,-Gilles; Roberge,-Marie-Anne; LeMay,-Sylvie (2003) Health-related quality of life models: Systematic
review of the literature. Social-Indicators-Research. 64 (2): 293-323
www.port.ac.uk
Quality of Working Life –
what, how and why
Quality of Working Life is the greater context in
which to understand various factors in the
workplace such as job satisfaction and stress.
A proper understanding of the bigger picture
would offer opportunity for better informed
interventions for individuals and at an
organisational level.
www.port.ac.uk
Quality of Working Life –
what, how and why
We looked at the literature, and talked with the
organisations we work with and came up with:
‘Quality of Working Life is that part of
overall quality of life that is influenced by
work… the widest context in which an
employee would evaluate the influence of
work on their life.’*
www.port.ac.uk
*Van Laar, Edwards & Easton (2007) 7
Quality of Working Life –
what, how and why
How?
We set out to develop a valid and reliable scale to
measure QoWL.
We started with our working definition to help define the
scope of a scale.
We drew upon theoretical definitions of QoWL
(Herzberg, Loscocco & Rochelle, Sirgy, Warr,etc.)
We had access to related scales, our own staff survey
data and job experts
www.port.ac.uk
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Quality of Working Life –
what, how and why
How: Development of a measure
200 questions were gathered from existing surveys or
generated based on theoretical requirements, and
reviewed by an expert panel to give an item pool of 61
questions.
The questionnaire was given to over 1000 employees of
the UK National Health Service, and EFA and CFA on the
two halves were undertaken.
The data sets were combined (N = 953) to confirm a 6
factor structure with 23 items (Overall C’s α = .91) and
show a ‘good’ model fit for the ‘Work-Related Quality of
Life’ (WRQoL) scale which appeared to be a valid and
reliable scale with good psychometric properties.
www.port.ac.uk
9
Quality of Working Life –
what, how and why
Work-Related Quality of Life (WRQoL) scale factors
Job Career Satisfaction (JCS) : α = .86
How far you agree that you are generally happy with your ability to do your
work
General Well Being (GWB) : α = .89
How much you agree you feel generally content with life as a whole
Home-Work Interface (HWI) : α = .82
How far you agree that the organisation understands and tries to help you
with pressures outside of work
Stress at Work (SAW) : α = .81
How far you feel agree you experience stress at work
Control at Work (CAW) : α = .81
How far you agree you feel you are involved in decisions that affect you at
work
Working Conditions (WCS) : α = .75
The extent you agree that you are happy with conditions in which you work
www.port.ac.uk
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Quality of Working Life –
what, how and why
The Big Picture………
Quality
of
Life
Home
HomeWork
Interface
Quality of
Working
Life
General
Well-Being
Stress at
Work
Work
Job -Career
Satisfaction
Individual
Working
Conditions
Control at
Work
www.port.ac.uk
*Van Laar, Edwards & Easton (2007)
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Quality of Working Life –
what, how and why
What best predicts Overall QoWL?
Question or factor
General Well-Being (GWB)
I am able to achieve a healthy balance of work and home
Working Conditions (WCS)
I am satisfied with my job
I feel my job is secure
I enjoy my work
I would recommend this organisation as good to work for
My work is as interesting and varied as I would want it to be
The quality of supervision is as good as I would want it to be
Good Relationships
Stress at Work (SAW)
…
(17th) I am paid fairly for the job I do, given my experience
t
16.205
14.805
9.606
9.572
8.522
7.339
6.388
4.087
3.979
3.531
-3.275
Sig.
0.001
0.001
0.001
0.001
0.001
0.001
0.001
0.001
0.001
0.001
0.001
2.11
0.035
Multiple Regression, with dependent variable: q65: I am satisfied with the
overall quality of my working life. R2 = .75, N = 5500.
www.port.ac.uk
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Quality of Working Life –
what, how and why
Patterns underlying overall quality of working life
75
70
a
65
b
c
%Agree
60
d
e
55
f
g
50
h
i
45
j
40
35
GWB
HWI
JCS
CAW
WCS
SAW
a to i = individual quality of working life report patterns
www.port.ac.uk
Overall
(q65)
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Quality of Working Life –
what, how and why
Why?
WRQoL factors help identify positive and
negative aspects of someone’s work experience
Reliable and valid assessment of those key
QoWL factors will provide required information
for career guidance, coaching and therapy
interventions
……..To improve current employment
or
……..Help identify what alternative jobs might be
more suitable to the individual.
www.port.ac.uk
Quality of Working Life –
what, how and why
Work-Related Quality of Life’ (WRQoL) scale
Individual reports
Organisational surveys
Research – we need you!
The WRQoL scale can be available for research
courtesy of QoWL Ltd, a University of
Portsmouth spin out company.
Go to; www.qowl.co.uk for more
information.
www.port.ac.uk
15
Quality of Working Life –
what, how and why
The Big Picture………
Quality
of
Life
Home
HomeWork
Interface
Quality of
Working
Life
General
Well-Being
Stress at
Work
Work
Job -Career
Satisfaction
Individual
Cultural &
Social &
Economic
Environment?
Working
Conditions
Control at
Work
www.port.ac.uk
*Van Laar, Edwards & Easton (2007)
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Quality of Working Life –
what, how and why
Try it! Email me to get your own individual
report with a free voucher code:
That’s it - Thanks for listening
Simon Easton & Dr Darren Van Laar
Department of Psychology,
University of Portsmouth, UK
[email protected]
With thanks to QoWL Ltd.
www.port.ac.uk
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Quality of Working Life –
what, how and why
References
Van Laar, D. L., Edwards, J. A. & Easton, S. (2007). The
Work-Related Quality of Life (QoWL) scale for
Healthcare Workers. Journal of Advanced Nursing.
60(3), 325-333.
Edwards, J. A., Webster, S., Van Laar, D. and Easton, S.
(2008). Psychometric analysis of the UK Health and
Safety Executive's Management Standards work-related
stress Indicator Tool, Work & Stress, 22(2), 96 - 107.
Edwards, J., Van Laar, D.L., Easton, S, Kinman, G.
(2009) The Work-Related Quality of Life scale for Higher
Education Employees. Quality in Higher Education. 15.
3. 207-219
www.port.ac.uk
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