Presentation Slides

Report
Step by Step:
A Walk Through
the Facets
of the IEP
Presented by
NYC DOE
IEP Managers
March 2010
The IEP Managers
Staten Island ISC Janet Blit: [email protected]
Brooklyn ISC Nick Chavarria: [email protected]
Manhattan ISC Madeline Rochelle: [email protected]
Queens ISC Tanya Smith: [email protected]
2
Audience Poll # 1
Who is in the audience?
•
Principal or Assistant Principal
•
Teacher
•
School Psychologist
•
Related Service Provider
•
IEP Teacher or Coordinator
•
Other
3
Facets of the IEP
4
The intent of a “Free Appropriate Public Education” (FAPE) for students with
disabilities is to design individualized instruction with sufficient supports and
services to enable the student to receive educational benefit.
WHAT IS THE
EDUCATIONAL BENEFIT REVIEW PROCESS?
Educational Benefit Review Process is a process
that will assist in examining & reflecting on the quality
of IEP development to increase student access,
participation, and progress in the general education
curriculum by providing an appropriate education.
5
Summary of Educational Benefit
reflects on the quality of IEP development to increase student access, participation, and progress in the general education
curriculum
The intent of a “Free Appropriate Public Education” (FAPE) for students with disabilities is: to design
individualized instruction with sufficient supports and services to enable the student to receive
educational benefit.
What is Educational Benefit?
>
Determining if there is a clear relationship between: the identified needs/present levels of performance, annual goals,
accommodations/modifications & services/placement
 (DOES IT ALL CONNECT?)
>
Have changes to annual goals, services/placement been made based on the results of the student’s progress?
 (HAS THE IEP BEEN WRITTEN/MODIFIED TO MEET THE STUDENT’S CURRENT NEEDS?)
>
Information on the student’s IEP: strengths, needs, annual goals, accommodations & modifications, services/placement
& progress compared – looking for patterns over the past 3 years
 (DOES THE IEP GIVE A CLEAR PICTURE OF THE STUDENT’S PROGRESS THROUGH THE YEARS?)
The Purpose of the Educational Benefit Review Process is:
to determine whether the design of the IEP was *reasonably calculated for the student to
receive educational benefit.
*Reasonable Calculation evaluates if the IEP reflects on the student’s present levels of
performance, goals, supports & maximize access, participation & progress in the
general education curriculum
Staten Island Integrated Service Center (ISC)
6
Present
Levels of Performance
Needs &
Concerns
Goals & Objectives
Accommodations
&
Modifications
Services
&
Placement
Progress
Toward
Goals
Was the student’s program reasonably calculated to result in educational benefit?
YES or NO?
7
Educational Benefit Chart/ Focus Transition
Present Levels
of Performance
Needs and
Concerns
Annual Goals
including Post
Secondary Goals
(Long-Term Adult
Outcomes)
Accommodations
& Modifications
Services and
Placements
Progress
Toward
Goals
Transition Services
Activities to Support Post Secondary Goals
(Required for students 15 years and older)
Instructional Activities
Community Integration
Community Integration
Education
Post High School
Employment
Independent Living
Independent Living
Daily Living Skills/Functional Vocational
Assessment
8
Focus: Suspension FBA/BIP Review
THE UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK
THE STATE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT
Student Name/ID:
Present Levels of
Performance &
Management
Needs
Disability:
Measurable
Annual
Goals
Progress
Toward
Annual
Goals
Supplementary
Aids and
Services
Grade Level:
Progress
Monitoring
of a BIP
Services/
Placement
IEP Meeting Date:
Was IEP Adjusted?
Social Development:
Management Needs:
Academic
Development:
Management Needs:
Health & Physical
Development:
Management Needs:
Was the IEP was reasonably calculated to ensure educational benefit to students with disabilities who have behaviors that interfere with learning?
For Example: (Compare progress across consecutive IEPs)
Student Name/ID: Chris Disability: LD
Present
Needs/Concerns
Grade Level: 7
Annual Goals
Accommodations
& Modifications
Levels of
Performance
Meeting: Annual Review
Services/
Placement
Date: 5/20/09
Progress
IEP #:
Was IEP
Adjusted?
Academic: ELA
WIAT Reading 4.0
GE
Able to write a 4-5
sentence
paragraph
0
+
Struggles with grade level
vocabulary
0
Written work is unclear and
lacks appropriate
organization of ideas
0
Identify meaning for 20
new content area
vocabulary words per
week
+ Consultant Teacher
Services
Fluently read a 5
paragraph passage of
curriculum level text
+
Independently write a 3
paragraph essay using
transitions, correct word
tense and order
0
0
Progressing
Satisfactorily
0
Progressing
Satisfactorily
0
No
ELA 2 hours per
week
Progressing
Satisfactorily
+
Last year’s IEP stated:
Last year’s IEP stated:
Last year’s IEP stated:
Last year’s IEP stated:
Last year’s IEP stated:
WIAT Reading 4.0 GE
Therefore, there was no
change in reading level.
Struggles with grade level
vocabulary
Therefore, the need remained the
same.
Identify meaning for 10 new content
area vocab words
Therefore, the goal increased the performance
expectation.
Consultant Teacher
Services
Therefore, the service and
placement remained the
same.
Progressing Satisfactorily
Therefore, the progress remained
the same.
Written work is unclear and
lacks appropriate organization
of ideas
Therefore, the need remained the
same.
Fluently read a 3 paragraph passage
of curriculum level text
Therefore, the goal increased the performance
expectation.
Able to write a 3
sentence paragraph
Therefore, there was an
increase in writing ability.
Progressing Satisfactorily
Therefore, the progress remained
the same.
Not Progressing
Therefore, the progress increased.
Independently write a 3 paragraph
essay using transitions, correct word
tense and order
Therefore, the goal did not increase the
performance expectation.
10
Present
Levels of Performance
13 years old
7th grader
Comprehension on 5th grade
level
Weak content area
vocabulary
3rd grade decoding skills
affect comprehension
Written work shows good
understanding of structure
(i.e. connecting ideas)
Weaknesses in grammar and
spelling
Weak long-term memory
affects knowledge of Math
facts and problem solving
speed
Can add and subtract with
regrouping
Level 1Vocational indicates
intent to attend a 4 year
college and pursue a teaching
career
Shows frustration (by putting
head on desk and refusing to
continue working) when
confronted with difficult
assignments
Needs &
Concerns
Weak
content area
vocabulary
3rd grade
decoding
skills affect
comprehension
Weaknesses
in grammar
and spelling
Weak longterm memory
affects
knowledge of
Math facts
and problem
solving speed
Shows
frustration (by
putting head
on desk and
refusing to
continue
working )
when
confronted
with difficult
assignments
Goals &
Objectives
Using vocabulary
enhancement strategies,
Susan will increase her
content area vocabulary to
approach grade level.
Using a multi-sensory
reading program for multisyllable words, Susan will
improve her decoding
skills to approach grade
level
Using a structured
explicit writing program
which scaffolds lessons,
Susan will write an essay
approaching grade level
Will use Math fluency
strategies to improve
knowledge of Math facts
and problem solving
abilities
Using modeling and role
playing strategies, Susan
will improve her ability to
respond appropriately
when frustrated
Accommodations
&
Modifications
Instructional
Preview vocabulary in
content area reading
assignments
Make vocabulary pick lists
availableMulti-sensory
reading program
Peer Reader
Structured, scaffolded
writing program
Work with a peer editor on
writing assignments
Frequent opportunities to
assume leadership role in
class activities
Provide pick list or
checklist of steps for
problems involving Math
computation
Use of calculator when
leaning more complex
processes
Modeling
Role-playing
Services
&
Placement
Special class
in community
school
Counseling
1:40:3
Progress Toward
Goals
Progress has
been noted since
last year
Progress reports
will be filled out
Chunking assignments into
manageable parts
Assessment Accommodations:
Time and a half
Separate location
Test read aloud except
when it interferes with the
construct of the test
Directions read aloud 2 more
times then the standard number of
times provided for all students
11
Present
Levels of Performance
13 years old
7th grader
Comprehension on 5th grade
level
Weak content area
vocabulary
3rd grade decoding skills
affect comprehension
Written work shows good
understanding of structure
(i.e. connecting ideas)
Weaknesses in grammar and
spelling
Weak long-term memory
affects knowledge of Math
facts and problem solving
speed
Can add and subtract with
regrouping
Level 1Vocational indicates
intent to attend a 4 year
college and pursue a teaching
career
Shows frustration (by putting
head on desk and refusing to
continue working) when
confronted with difficult
assignments
Needs &
Concerns
Weak
content area
vocabulary
3rd grade
decoding
skills affect
comprehension
Weaknesses
in grammar
and spelling
Weak longterm memory
affects
knowledge of
Math facts
and problem
solving speed
Shows
frustration (by
putting head
on desk and
refusing to
continue
working )
when
confronted
with difficult
assignments
Goals &
Objectives
Using vocabulary
enhancement strategies,
Susan will increase her
content area vocabulary to
approach grade level.
Using a multi-sensory
reading program for multisyllable words, Susan will
improve her decoding
skills to approach grade
level
Using a structured
explicit writing program
which scaffolds lessons,
Susan will write an essay
approaching grade level
Will use Math fluency
strategies to improve
knowledge of Math facts
and problem solving
abilities
Using modeling and role
playing strategies, Susan
will improve her ability to
respond appropriately
when frustrated
Accommodations
&
Modifications
Instructional
Preview vocabulary in
content area reading
assignments
Make vocabulary pick lists
available
Multi-sensory reading
program
Peer Reader
Structured, scaffolded
writing program
Work with a peer editor on
writing assignments
Frequent opportunities to
assume leadership role in
class activities
Provide pick list or
checklist of steps for
problems involving Math
computation
Use of calculator when
leaning more complex
processes
Modeling
Role-playing
Services
&
Placement
Special class
in community
school
Counseling
1:40:3
Progress Toward
Goals
Progress has
been noted since
last year
Progress reports
will be filled out
Chunking assignments into
manageable parts
Assessment Accommodations:
Time and a half
Separate location
Test read aloud except
when it interferes with the
construct of the test
Directions read aloud 2 more
times then the standard number of
times provided for all students
12
Frequently Asked Question
Are schools required to complete the Educational
Benefit Review chart for every IEP we now write?
13
Facets of the IEP
IEP Meeting
Agenda
14
Sample IEP Meeting Agenda*
1) Member Introduction: title and role at the IEP Meeting
2) Purpose of IEP Meeting and summary of the IEP team obligations
3) Review of Procedural Safeguards with parent(s)
4) Identification of evaluations and other information for consideration to
determine:
• whether the student has an identified disability; and
• whether the student requires special education services
5) IEP Development
• present levels of performance
• annual goals
• accommodations, if necessary
• promotion criteria
• diploma objectives/transition
• recommended services and level of service delivery
6) Summary of IEP determinations and opportunity for parent to ask questions
7) If the meeting is a subcommittee meeting, inform the parent of their right to
request a Full Committee meeting if s/he disagree with the recommendation
8) Next Steps, as necessary
(for example, the placement process outlined in Section 7)
9) Finalized IEP to be distributed at the end of the meeting or immediately sent
to parent. The date the IEP is provided to parent must be indicated on
the Contact Sheet in the student’s file.
* This agenda can be found on page 77 of the SOPM.
15
District IEP Representative
The District IEP Representative is a representative of the school district who is:
> qualified to provide/supervise the provision of special education; AND;
> knowledgeable about the general education curriculum; AND;
> knowledgeable about the availability of district resources.
The person serving as the district representative may also fulfill the role of
another person on the IEP Team.
Important! The principal will designate the individual who will serve as the
district representative for IEP meetings held at the school. The Committee on
Special Education Chairperson will designate who will serve as the district
representative for IEP meetings held at the Committee on Special Education
Office.
Memorandum: Children First Reforms in Special Education,
July 1, 2007, Linda Wernikoff, Executive Director, Office
of Special Education
16
Guiding Considerations for the IEP Meeting
Think of how you would guide the IEP Team to determine the most
appropriate LRE setting. Consider the following:
> Present level of performance
> Current setting
> Supports and services that support academic success (i.e. pass courses
and demonstrate proficiency on assessments) in subject areas
In addition, consider the following:
> Listening, speaking , reading, writing and thinking skills and strategies
required in each of the academic disciplines
> Options for providing services in the LRE setting
> Students’ preferences and interests
> Transition Needs
> Outside support
17
SUBCOMMITTEE ON SPECIAL EDUCATION
Annual Review
Initials
Requested
Reviews/Mandated
Three-Year Review
Full Committee
Special Education
Teacher/Related Service
Provider
√
√
√
√
General Education Teacher
√
√
√
√
Parent
√
√
√
√
Student
√
√
√
√
District Representative
√
√
√
√
School Psychologist
Not Required
√
√
√
School Social Worker
Not Required
*See next slide
*See next slide
*See next slide
Parent Member
Not Required
Not Required
Not Required
*See next slide
Physician
Not Required
Not Required
Not Required
*See next slide
Memorandum: Children First Reforms in Special Education,
July 1, 2007, Linda Wernikoff, Executive Director, Office
of Special Education
18
Subcommittee on Special Education
A Special Education Teacher or Special Education Provider must participate as a
member of the IEP team.
> If the student is receiving special education services, it must be the
student’s Special Education Teacher or Special Education Provider .
> When the student’s only special education service is a related service, the
related service provider participates as the student’s Special Education
Provider
The School Social Worker may participate in a Subcommittee or Full Committee
IEP Meeting if he/she is involved in any aspect of the evaluation process.
The Parent Member must participate in Full Committee Reviews.
A School Physician is also a required participant if the parent, member of the
school, or IEP Team member at the Committee makes a request for a physician
to attend at least seventy-two (72) hours prior to the IEP meeting.
Memorandum: Children First Reforms in Special Education,
July 1, 2007, Linda Wernikoff, Executive Director, Office
of Special Education
19
Facets of the IEP
IEP Meeting
Agenda
20
Check this box to indicate that this
IEP reflects Transition Services
IEP Meeting
Agenda
We urge schools to combine the 3-year-review (Tri) (if
applicable) and the annual review, by moving the IEP
Meeting up to the earlier compliance date, when possible.
An IEP may be amended only
after an annual review meeting.
(See SOPM Pages 13, 72-73)
(ISP-See SOPM Page 92, 119-121)
(See SOPM Page 77)
VERIFY
Indicate the
student’s
current grade.
VERIFY
Definition of a Parent (See SOPM Pages 35-38)
Parental Revocation (See SOPM Pages 41, 140-141, 193 & 194)
VERIFY - NEVER LEAVE BLANK
Checking this box
indicates
“Special
Education”
Transportation
IEP meeting recommendations are written here at the end of meeting
e.g. Special Class with Related Services (if applicable)
Medical/physical:
”ABR”
Note: for all CTT classes K-12
the staffing ratio is 12:1
(See SOPM Page 13)
(See SOPM: Pages 92, 120- Alternate placement statements- if applicable:)
(See SOPM page 55: Bilingual Cascade)
(The type of vehicle (e.g. mini wagon) is not to be indicated on the IEP-See SOPM page 94)
Prior to writing on this line, contact your school’s Special Education Liaison for “Specialized Transportation” Procedures
21
Facets of the IEP
IEP Meeting
Agenda
22
NOTE: All
mandated
members
MUST sign
this page
only if
they
attend the
IEP
meeting
Check appropriate box below
Mandated Member
(See SOPM Page 65)
Mandated & designated by the Principal
(See SOPM Pages 66-67, 71, 76, 103, 109 & 153)
Mandated Member
(See SOPM
Page 64 & 67)
Mandated Member
(See SOPM Pages 67, 69, 71 & 72)
(See SOPM Pages 64, 65, 67, 70, 75, 104 & 153)
Students age 14 and older,
must be invited to the IEP meeting
- (see sample invite)
(See SOPM Page 66)
See Sample Student IEP Meeting Invitation Handout
Chapter 408
(See SOPM Pages 64, 67, 69, 70 & 74))
Additional Members (See SOPM Page 68)
(See SOPM Page 112)
Member Excusal (See SOPM Pages 70 – 72 & 179)
NOTE: IEP TEAM MANDATED MEMBERS CANNOT BE
EXCUSED FROM INITIAL MEETINGS
All changes must be written here & check appropriate box
These dates must be indicated
not to exceed one year
not to exceed one year
These dates must be indicated
(See SOPM Page 76)
These dates must be indicated
(See SOPM Page 76)
SC/CTT Preference Form (See SOPM Pages 109)
23
Facets of the IEP
IEP Meeting
Agenda
24
Present Levels of Performance Samples
(See SOPM Pages 105-107)
Student’s STRENGTHS & needs should be described in this section.
Describe the instructional implications of the testing results listed below
(What does the testing results listed below look like in classroom instruction?).
Transition interests
and needs are part
IMPORTANT: All student’s academic needs described in this section should be addressed on
of the PLoPs
IEP page 6-annual goals.
Include present levels of performance from related service providers (if applicable).
Transition statements in the present levels of performance on this page must be used to develop transition plan goals on IEP pages 6 & 10
_____
_____
Results of the assessments in
this section should be
described above
Results of the assessments in
this section should be
described above
(Scores recorded should be current –
within 1 year)
(Scores recorded should be current –
within 1 year)
Mandated Three-Year Review
(See SOPM Pages 31, 73 & 175)
(See SOPM Pages 81, 105 & 107)
Indicate the instructional modifications and resources to enable the student to succeed (e.g. learning styles,
visual aids, books on tape, manipulatives, etc.). What will the student need immediately for access to gradelevel curriculum (what modifications, if any) while remediation related to Annual Goals is taking place?
25
____
Social skills relevant to job
interviews or on-the-job behaviors
need to be described here.
(See statement above for details)
Present Levels of Performance Samples
(See SOPM Pages 105-107)
FBA/BIP (See SOPM
Pages 48, 51, 105, 149, 151, & 153)
If either of these last 2 boxes are checked then
FBA & BIP Required
(See SOPM Pages 81 & 107)
FYI: All students with an IEP recommendation for a behavior
management/crisis paraprofessional should have an FBA & BIP
A BIP should be developed and implemented
collaboratively by the teachers, paraprofessional (if
applicable), related service providers (if applicable) and
staff working with the student.
26
FBA/BIP: What is it?
• A functional behavioral assessment (FBA) is a process of
determining the function that a behavior serves for an
individual. This is accomplished by careful assessment of
the situations that give rise to a behavior and the
consequences that result.*
• A behavior intervention plan (BIP) is based on the results
of the FBA. It describes the problem behavior, a
hypothesis as to why the problem behavior occurs and
intervention strategies to address that behavior.*
*Standard Operating Procedures Manual: February, 2009, p51
27
FBA/BIP: How does the process work?
The FBA/BIP Team members gather data regarding student
behavior by means of direct observation as well as interviewing
staff members, the student and the parents of the student, as
deemed appropriate.
Review all student records and previous interventions
> Include teacher reports, school records, educational
evaluations, psychological reports, medical history, etc.
Compile as much information as possible!
> Review all successes the student experiences during the
school day.
28
FBA/BIP:
Is the process just for special education students?
No.
An FBA must be conducted for any student whose behavior
impedes his/her learning, or that of others, and for certain
students subject to discipline outlined in section 10, SOPM.*
The process can be used as a strategy to eliminate the need for
referral to special education as a result of behavioral challenges.
Parental consent is required in order to conduct the process with
General Education students.
*SOPM, 2009, p. 51
29
Behavior Intervention Plan
BIP: A Behavior Intervention Plan seeks to answer four elements.
1. Describe the behaviors that interfere with learning.
2. What behavior changes are expected?
3. What strategies/supports are going to be tried to change the
behavior?
4. When will the plan be evaluated? How/who will evaluate the
plan?
30
(See SOPM Pages 105-107)
All Special Alerts from IEP Page 1 should be reflected here
Health needs that might affect
career development/occupational
skills must be described here.
Include present levels of performance from related service providers
(if applicable, e.g. OT, PT, Health, etc.)
This should be reflective of page 1
Do not write specific name of any medication
(See SOPM Pages 52, 70, 96, 105 & 256)
(See SOPM Pages 81, 105 & 107)
e.g. F.M. Unit
31
Facets of the IEP
IEP Meeting
Agenda
32
Annual Goals
Annual Goals need to be SMART!
S - Specific
M - Measurable
A - Achievable
R - Relevant
T – Time related
33
S.M.A.R.T Annual Goals
Note: Do not get “hung-up” on the color codes; many S.M.A.R.T. elements overlap. The main purpose is to ensure that
all 5 elements are included in each annual goal.
S – Specific: What is the observable behavior that the student will do, in a year,
that the student is not able to do now?
M – Measurable: How will you know when the student has accomplished the
goal? What criteria for measurement will you use?
A – Achievable: Based on the student’s current level of performance, what is a
reasonable and attainable higher level of performance that the student
will achieve within one year?
(What will you see happening a year from now that you don’t see happening at the present time, and what can the
student reasonably be expected to be able to do in one year?)
R – Relevant: Does the annual goal reflect individual needs identified in the
Present Levels of Performance? How does the annual goal relate to the
student’s classroom performance?
(Annual goals emanate from the present levels of performance and must have a direct relationship
with classroom performance).
T – Time Related: The evaluation schedule
34
Annual Goal
Present Level of Performance:
Jose is a 9th grade student whose writing skills demonstrate elementary
sentence structure, lack of organization, and multiple errors in grammar and
punctuation. Jose…...
S – Specific, M – Measurable, A – Achievable, R – Relevant, T – Time Related
Annual Goal:
In one year, Jose will write a complete paragraph with at least 5
complex sentences, using a minimum of 5-7 words per sentence,
including content-related vocabulary, with accurate grammar and
punctuation. Jose will achieve this goal in 4 out of 5 trials as
determined through classroom activities, work samples and/or
tests/quizzes. Progress will be assessed over a two week period.
Note: Do not get “hung-up” on the color codes; many S.M.A.R.T. elements overlap. This is only one
example to ensure that all 5 elements are included in the annual goal.
35
MEASURABLE ANNUAL GOALS
Measurable annual goals, including academic and functional goals consistent with the student’s
needs and abilities, related to:
1) meeting the student’s needs that result from the student’s disability to enable the student to be
involved in and progress in the general curriculum:
2) meeting each of the student’s other educational needs that result from the student’s disability; and
3) for students age 15 and older, annual goals to move the student toward his/her postsecondary
goals.
Annual Goals
What the student will be expected to do by the
end of the year in which the IEP is in effect
Jose will write a complete paragraph with
at least 5 complex sentences, using a
minimum of 5-7 words per sentence,
including content-related vocabulary, with
accurate grammar and punctuation
Criteria
Measure to determine if goal
has been achieved
Jose will achieve this goal
in 4 out of 5 trials
Method
How progress will be
measured
classroom activities,
work samples and/or
tests/quizzes.
Schedule
When progress will
be measured
Progress will be
assessed over a
two week period.
36
Facets of the IEP
IEP Meeting
Agenda
37
.
Do not
write
the
subject
areas
for
SETSS
or ICT
(CTT)
here.
For
SETSS.
Write
“All”.
ICT:
Do not write “core
subjects” or “content area
subjects” You must
indicate the name of each
subject which will be cotaught (e.g. Math)
For students who receive related
services as a supplementary aid &
service simply indicate “Related
Service(s).” It is not necessary to
list each related service here since
they are specified on IEP page 9.
Integrated Co-Teaching - 12:1 - Collaborative Team Teaching (CTT) (See SOPM Page 13)
For students who receive
related services as a
supplementary aid &
service simply indicate
Related Service(s). It is
not necessary to list each
related service here since
they are specified on IEP
page 9.
38
.
ALL
English
ALL
Integrated Co-Teaching for all
subjects/classes
This is more often used in
elementary schools. But be
careful! This means that a special
education teacher is required to
co-teach all periods, including
cluster subjects. Some students
may need this. “All” means all.
39
.
ALL
English
ALL Integrated Co-Teaching for ELA,
Math, Science, Social Studies
You should specify the subjects
that will be co-taught each week
here, under “Supplemental Aids
and service” that the student
will receive.
40
.
ALL
English
ALL
Integrated Co-Teaching for ELA
and Math
Two periods a day of ICT may be
characterized as “part-time ICT”
on the IEP Page 1. The number
of periods of ICT per week
should be specified here under
Supplementary Aids and Service.
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Facets of the IEP
IEP Meeting
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(See SOPM: Page 128)
(Must be consistent with page 2)
“Conference Result”
I-INITIATION
C-CONTINUATION
M-MODIFICATION
T-TERMINATION
(See SOPM: Page 92- if applicable:)
“Interim Monolingual Speech pending availability of a bilingual provider”
e.g. Speech and Language Therapy
General Education
Classroom
OR
Indicate
the
Specify
time
mandated
group size
Separate Location
Testing accommodations MUST reflect the individual
student’s needs
Declassification test accommodations (See SOPM Page 88)
Students in 8th grade should not have modified
promotion criteria written on their IEP for the following
school year if their IEP is developed after January 31st.
•High school students (grades 9-12) with disabilities must attain the
necessary number of credits in order to be promoted to the next grade.
They do not have modified promotion criteria.
43
Recommending Interim Speech/Language Therapy in English For
English Language Learners Recommended For Bilingual
Speech/Language Therapy
When an IEP Team recommends that interim
Speech/Language Therapy in English be provided to a
student recommended for bilingual Speech/Language
Therapy:
• an IEP meeting must be held indicating the recommended
service and noting that it will be provided on an interim
basis.
• In the related services section of the IEP, the IEP Team
will write “Interim Monolingual Speech pending availability
of a bilingual provider” and include frequency, duration
and group size, and appropriate goals developed.
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Facets of the IEP
IEP Meeting
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45
When and How are Transition Services Indicated?
In the year that the student turns 12: A Level 1 Vocational Assessment is
conducted (See SOPM pages 220-222).
In the year that the student turns 14: Incorporate findings from the Level 1
Vocational Assessment into the IEP
> Begin using the Transition page (10) of the IEP (Long Term Adult
Outcomes only).
> Include Diploma Objective
In the year that the student turns 15: The Transition Services (bottom half of
the page) are added to the Transition page of the IEP and implemented by
the school, parents and agencies.
> Transition Services begin.
In the year the student graduates or turns 21 (leaves school): An Exit
Summary must be conducted (See SOPM pages 224-229)
46
TRANSITION
• Transition should be addressed in the Present Levels of
Performance, annual goals, and Transition sections for students
age 14 and older.
 Example: (Student) stated that s/he is interested in working in the field of
computer graphics after high school.
• Indicate the student’s needs, preferences and interests, relating
to the transition (age 14 and older) from school, to postsecondary outcomes, within the present level of performance,
and ensure that this information is clearly linked to the annual
goals and transition components of the IEP.
47
Annual Goal: Transition
Present Level of Performance:
During Gary’s Level 1 Vocational Assessment interview with his teacher, he stated that he is
interested in a career in the field of computer programming. He indicated that he is
specifically interested in designing computer games. Gary participated in a summer
internship program, in an advertising office, where he was given some training in designing
simple games used for interactive internet ads. He is very eager to learn about the
requirements for this career and will do so with the assistance of his teachers, guidance
counselor, and transition linkage coordinator. Gary…..
S – Specific, M – Measurable, A – Achievable, R – Relevant, T – Time Related
Annual Goal:
In one year, Gary will read twenty articles from computer trade magazines, as measured
by a poster chart that he will create, referencing the publications and articles. Gary will
write a brief topic summary relating to each article. Progress will be assessed by the
teacher every 2-3 months by review of the poster chart, content of the summaries and
teacher discussion with the student.
Note: Do not get “hung-up” on the color codes; many S.M.A.R.T. elements overlap. This is only one
example to ensure that all 5 elements are included in the annual goal.
48
MEASURABLE ANNUAL GOALS
Measurable annual goals, including academic and functional goals consistent with the student’s
needs and abilities, related to:
1) meeting the student’s needs that result from the student’s disability to enable the student to be
involved in and progress in the general curriculum:
2) meeting each of the student’s other educational needs that result from the student’s disability; and
3) for students age 15 and older, annual goals to move the student toward his/her postsecondary
goals.
Annual Goals
What the student will be expected to do by the
end of the year in which the IEP is in effect
Gary will read twenty articles from
computer trade magazines and will
write a brief topic summary relating to
each article.
Criteria
Measure to determine if goal
has been achieved
Method
How progress will be
measured
Schedule
When progress will
be measured
Achievement will be
determined by review of
the poster chart, content
of the summaries and
teacher discussion with
the student.
as measured by a
poster chart that he
will create,
referencing the
publications and
articles.
Progress will be
assessed by the
teacher every 2-3
months
49
NOTE: Transition MUST be reflected throughout the IEP - e.g. pages 3-6 & 10
The school year that the student turns 14
(See SOPM Pages 66, 77, 81, 87 & 108)
Measurable post secondary goals
Gary will play basketball in his community league.
Gary will enroll in a four-year college, and major in graphic design.
Gary will live in a dormitory during college, and in an apartment after graduation.
Gary will be competitively employed as a graphic designer, full-time.
The school year that the student turns 14
(See SOPM pages 77, 81, 89, 90, 99 & 230)
X
June 2012
26
1/31/2010
The school year that the student turns 15
During art classes Gary will incorporate original graphic designs generated by computer into art projects.
X
X
Gary will join the high school computer club.
X
X
Gary will use an online career research site to investigate colleges that offer programs in graphic design.
X
X
X
Gary will receive training in budgeting and check book management.
X
Not required at this time.
Level 1 Vocational Assessment
(See SOPM Pages 48, 50, 105 & 220-222)
EXIT SUMMARY (See SOPM Pages 13, 90 & 224 - 229)
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Facets of the IEP
IEP Meeting
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_________________________
Least Restrictive Environment (See SOPM Page 81)
> General Education with Supplementary Aids & Services should be your first
consideration.
(See SOPM Pages 11, 66, 81, 98 & 103)
> Provide an explanation of all programs/services considered and the reason for
rejection.
NOTE: All services/program options discussed at
the IEP meeting should be listed
The programs listed should be written in the language consistent with
the Continuum of Services (e.g. Special Education Teacher Support
Services, etc.)
Students who demonstrate severe language & communication difficulties which significantly interfere with
their school performance may be considered for exemption. These deficits must be clearly indicated in the
Present Levels of Performance & the team must provide an explanation for the exemption .
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Facets of the IEP
IEP Meeting
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Participation in Assessment
Most students with IEPs will participate in State and district-wide assessments.
On page 9:
•
Check the box “without accommodations” if the student will participate in tests under
standard conditions; OR
•
Check the box “with accommodation” if the student with a disability will participate in
tests with the use of specifically noted accommodations. Describe specific
accommodations in the area provided. These accommodations will be used
consistently for all teacher developed, as well as standardized tests.
•
Examples of accommodation areas to be considered by the IEP Team include
modification in:




Timing
Scheduling
Setting
Presentation
 Response
•
For more information, see pages 55 and 65 of “Creating a Quality IEP”.
•
Also, see the “Test Access and Accommodations for Students with Disabilities”
guidebook on the New York State Education Department’s website.
54
Testing Accommodations
Testing accommodations are changes made in the
administration of the test in order to remove obstacles that are
presented by the disability without changing the construct of
the test. Not all students with IEPs require test
accommodations. The rationale must appear in the Present
Levels of Performance.
Example:
Gary will participate in State and City-wide tests with accommodations:
Time and one-half will be permitted on all assessments.*
* This aligns with information found in Gary’s Present Levels of Performance (page 3).
55
Participation in Alternate Assessment
Determining whether or not a student participates in Alternate Assessment can
only be determined by a school psychologist during an Educational Planning
Conference.
•
It can never be determined during an Annual Review.
If a student participates in Alternate Assessment, check the box “the student WILL
PARTICIPATE in Alternate Assessment”.
•
State the reasons for participation in Alternate Assessment; and
•
In addition to the State Alternate Assessment describe how the student will be
assessed.
56
Consideration for Modified Promotion Criteria
NOTE …
The student’s current grade level, not functional level, should
be the first consideration, when formulating modified
promotion criteria.
 Promotional criteria should be based on the performance
indicators of the grade the student is currently in.
Reminder: As per IDEIA, Students with Disabilities must be
educated alongside their non-disabled peers and receive the
same curriculum instruction at their current grade level.
57
Steps in Determining Modified Promotion
Criteria…
Step 1:
Review the NYSED Performance Indicators (PI)
English Language Arts
Reading
Writing
Listening
Speaking
Mathematics
• Problem Solving Strand
•
•
•
•
Reasoning and Proof Strand
Communication Strand
Connections Strand
Representation Strand
•
•
•
•
•
Number Sense and Operations Strand
Algebra Strand
Geometry Strand
Measurement Strand
Statistics and Probability Strand (Not
included for Grade 8)
58
Steps in Determining Modified Promotion
Criteria…
Step 2:
Determine performance indicators already achieved by the
student at the time of the IEP meeting and performance
indicators you expect /project the student to meet through
June of the current school year.
Consider:
> Rate of learning (how long it takes to master concepts and skills)
> Assessments
> Achievement
> Services/Supports
59
Steps in Determining Modified Promotion
Criteria…
Step 3:
Compute the percentage of the Performance Indicators met & projected
to be met by the student by the end of the current school year using
the formula below:
Formulating Modified Promotion Criteria
Total Performance Indicators met + projected ÷ Total Performance Indicators x 100= ___%
(PI Met + PI Projected ÷ Total PI) x 100 = %)
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Facets of the IEP
IEP Meeting
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THE
END
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