Prefixes, Suffixes, and Roots

Report
Prefixes, Suffixes, and
Root Words
Information is from the following website:
http://www.slideshare.net/146online/5th-grade-prefixes-suffixes-roots
Why learn about prefixes, suffixes and root
words?
Understanding prefixes, suffixes, and roots can help you
to determine the meaning of new and unfamiliar words
as you come across them while reading.
Prefixes
A prefix is a group of letters added before a word or base
to change its meaning and form a new word.
The most common prefixes
(with their meaning in parenthesis)
dis- (not, opposite of)
Examples: disagree, discomfort
in-, im-, il-, ir- (not)
Examples: injustice, impossible, illegal, irregular
re- (again)
Examples: rewrite, return, repeat
un- (not)
Examples: unfriendly, unsure
Suffix
A suffix is a group of letters added after a word or base
and form a new word.
The most common suffixes
(with their meaning in parenthesis)
-ed (past tense verbs) Examples: jumped, hopped
-ing (present participle) Examples: running, eating
-or, -er (one who) Examples: actor, teacher, driver
-less (without) Examples: fearless, hopeless
-logy (study field of) Examples: biology, geology
-s, -es (more than one) Examples: books, boxes
Suffixes to learn in 7th grade
-ic (relating to/characterized by) Examples: energetic, historic,
epidemic
-ive, -ative, -itive (inclined/tending toward an action) Examples:
festive, talkative, active, sensitive
Root words
A root is the most basic form of a word that is able to
convey a particular meaning.
The most common root words
(with their meaning in parenthesis)
aud (sound) Examples: audible, audiotape
bio (life) Examples: autobiography, biology
meter (measure) Examples: thermometer, odometer
port (carry) Examples: transport, portable
Root words to learn in 7th grade
contra, counter (against) Examples: contradict, contraband, encounter,
counteract
form (to shape) Examples: conform, reform, transform
mater, matr (mother) Examples: maternal, matrimony
pater, patr (father) Examples: paternal, patriot
sect, sec (to cut) Examples: dissect, section, intersection, bisect
Root words to learn in 7th grade (continued)
belli (war) Examples: belligerent, bellicose, rebel
anthropo (man; human; humanity) Examples: anthropologist,
philanthropy
mono (one) Examples: monopoly, monologue, monotonous
phil (love) Examples: philanthropist, philosophy
hydr (water) Examples: hydration, dehydrate, hydraulic
Use context clues to help solve the
meaning of a word.
Information is from the following websites:
http://www.woodland.k12.mo.us/faculty/rgarner/reading/context_clues.htm
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=73p_oKEYqTQ
Context Clues-What are they?
Context clues are bits of information from the text that, when
combined with prior knowledge, allow you to decide the
meaning of unknown words in the story or article you are
reading.
As a reader you must act similar to a detective and put together
clues from sentences surrounding an unknown word in order to
make an intelligent “guess” as to what the definition of a word
is.
Four types of context clues
1.Examples or Rewording
2. Synonyms
3. Antonyms
4. Drawing Conclusions
Examples or Rewording
Rewording or examples is when the author says the
word in another way, that is typically easier to
understand.
Example:
“Resentment, a feeling of bitterness and anger, is often
felt by people who are passed over for promotions.”
What does the word resentment mean in the sentence?
A feeling of anger and bitterness
Synonyms
Synonyms are used as context clues when an author uses a
similar word for a word which you might not already know the
definition.
Example:
“The young girl was very aloof. She always seems
unsociable, unapproachable, and uninterested.”
What does the word aloof mean?
Unsociable, unapproachable, or uninterested
Antonyms
Antonyms are used as context clues when an author uses a word
(or a phrase) that means the opposite of the word you might not
understand.
Example:
We thought the athletes would be famished after their
game, but they were not hungry at all.
What does the word famished mean?
Hungry
Drawing Conclusion
Drawing conclusion is when you have to look at the general meaning or logic
of the sentence and passage. You must draw conclusions based on the
information given.
To do this, you should ask yourself questions about the passage. Answering these
questions will often lead you to a reasonably accurate guess about the meaning
of the word.
Example:
It took two days for the volunteers to extricate the little girl from the
bottom of the well.
What does the word extricate mean?
Hint…To figure out the meaning, you need to ask yourself what volunteers
might do if a small child was stuck in a well.
To free or release
Don’t forget!!!
Understanding and remembering prefixes, suffixes, and root words
can help you to determine the meaning of new and unfamiliar
words as you come across them while reading.
Understanding and remembering the different types of context clues
will help you to decide the meaning of unknown words in the story or
article you are reading.

similar documents