CEW

Report
1. Please get out your article from Friday. It is due today.
2. Please get out your notebook for some notes.
3. You should have a choice novel already chosen. If you
don’t have it today, bring it tomorrow. I will get titles
and page numbers. Your first one page is due Friday,
Oct. 3!
4. Tomorrow we begin our unit on bias!
Today’s outcomes:
1. Review and grade annotation homework
2. Review and practice C-E-W (claim-evidence-warrant)
through murder mysteries!
How are you progressing with annotations? Look at your
packet and score yourself. Put score on front page!
4
Great progress. At least 5 annotations per page, writing in the margins,
different types of annotations used, some questions and main ideas are
written in the margins
3
Good progress. Most pages have at least 5 annotations per page, there
is some writing in the margins, a few different types of annotations are
used, might be lacking questions in the margin
2
So, so progress. Some pages have at least 5 annotations per page, there
is occasional writing in the margins, a couple different types of
annotations are used
1
Little progress. Few pages have at least 5 annotations per page, there is
little to no writing in the margins
0
Not yet. There are not enough annotations to evaluate yet.
You may want to take a few
notes today as we review
Claim, Evidence, and Warrant.
Must be an OPINION, not a FACT
Must be SPECIFIC
Must be about the TEXT
Evidence:
This is specific textual evidence that supports
or proves your opinion; you give the specific
textual evidence to the reader. Don’t let the
reader guess the information!
Quotes from the text
 Make sure to introduce each quote with “for example,” or
“the author states” or “In addition, the author mentions” or
something like that. Don’t just plop evidence into the
paragraph; make use of the transition words!
 All evidence that you take from the article must be in
quotation marks “”!
Use separate pieces of evidence for each claim.
Warrant:
Explain HOW the evidence supports your claim.
Explain even things you think are obvious!
Use transition words.
The warrant is usually is at least 2 sentences in
length and maybe longer. It should be longer than
the evidence you are explaining.
Pulling it all together
Make good use of transition words:
For example…
In addition,…
On the other hand,…
However,…
Finally, …
transition words
Introducing Evidence:
 For example, in the article…
 Author _________ states…
 (Author Name) writes…
Introducing your Warrant (Simple):
 This _____ shows (i.e. “This quote shows…”)
 This _____ proves/disproves (“this statistic proves…”)
 This _____ is important because
Introducing your Warrant (a bit fancier):
 This _____ clarifies
 This _____ suggests
 This _____ undermines
 This _____ enhances
 This _____ argues that
Review
 What is a CLAIM?
 What is EVIDENCE?
 What is a WARRANT?
 CLAIM: A statement that coveys your
interpretation/belief about
something. This is a conclusion you
have drawn from the facts presented.
A claim can be argued.
 EVIDENCE: Facts from the text
(commercial, journal, book, prompt
whatever!) used to support your
claim. All good arguments must be
supported by a strong foundation of
facts. In other words, one fact is not
enough!
 WARRANT: Explain HOW and WHY
this evidence supports your claim. It’s
the “SO WHAT?”
Find a partner and see if you can solve
these crimes!
When you think you have figured it out,
please write a CEW paragraph explaining
your solution. 
Rescue at Sea
“Thank heaven you saw me!” exclaimed Tom Bond as he feebly helped make fast
his battered yawl to Dr. Haledjian’s chartered fishing boat.
Haledjian reached over the side and assisted the bedraggled yachtsman aboard.
Bond staggered into the shade of the cabin and sagged upon a berth. He
removed his cap to wipe the perspiration from his brow, revealing a bald, freckled
head.
“Drink this,” said Haledjian, holding out a cup of water.
Bond gulped it frantically, asked for a second, and when he had downed it, told
of his ordeal.
“Ben Page and I were sailing when the storm hit us. The sails, rudder, and radio
went in the first five minutes. We barely managed to keep afloat.
“We drifted five days, lost. Three days ago our fresh water supply gave out. Ben
went crazy with the heat and thirst. He started to drink the ocean water. I tried to
restrain him – I hit him. He – he struck his head against the starboard rail. He’s
dead! It’s my fault!”
Haledjian climbed into Bond’s disheveled yacht. In the little cabin he found Ben
Page laid out on his back, dead. The criminologist studied the bruise on Page’s jaw
and the one at the base of his skull.
Back on the fishing boat, he warned Bond grimly, “You’re going to have to tell the
police a better tale than the one you told me!”
Is Haledjian correct? Did Bond kill Ben Page? Explain using CEW.
“Thank heaven you saw me!” exclaimed Tom Bond
as he feebly helped make fast his battered yawl to Dr.
Haledjian’s chartered fishing boat.
Haledjian reached over the side and assisted the
bedraggled yachtsman aboard.
Bond staggered into the shade of the cabin and
sagged upon a berth. He removed his cap to wipe the
perspiration from his brow, revealing a bald, freckled
head.
“Drink this,” said Haledjian, holding out a cup of
water.
Bond gulped it frantically, asked for a second, and
when he had downed it, told of his ordeal.
“Ben Page and I were sailing when the storm hit
us. The sails, rudder, and radio went in the first five
minutes. We barely managed to keep afloat.
“We drifted five days, lost. Three days ago our
fresh water supply gave out. Ben went crazy with the
heat and thirst. He started to drink the ocean water. I
tried to restrain him – I hit him. He – he struck his head
against the starboard rail. He’s dead! It’s my fault!”
Haledjian climbed into Bond’s disheveled yacht.
In the little cabin he found Ben Page laid out on his
back, dead. The criminologist studied the bruise on
Page’s jaw and the one at the base of his skull.
Back on the fishing boat, he warned Bond grimly,
“You’re going to have to tell the police a better tale than
the one you told me!”
Is Haledjian correct? Did Bond kill Ben Page? Explain
using CEW.
Claim:
Evidence
Warrant
Claim:
Bond DID kill Ben Page.
Evidence
Warrant
When Bond got on the boat, he
took off his hat and “removed his
cap to wipe the perspiration from
his brow, revealing a bald, freckled
head.” He later told Haledjian that
the fresh water supply ran out
“three days ago.”
If the fresh water supply had run out three days ago, that would
mean that neither man drank any fresh water. Without fresh
water, Bond would not perspire-in fact, he would have been
dehydrated. Had he been dehydrated, he couldn’t have “wiped the
perspiration from his brow.” Bond lied about the water running
out and Ben going crazy.
The Traveler
“Try the manual dial,” suggested Dr. Haledjian, after Captain Gordon of the Miami police had
punched all the push buttons of the radio and had got only static.
Immediately, music pored out noisily.
“Do you always play the radio so loud?” snapped Gordon at the pale youth riding
handcuffed in the rear seat of the car.
“I play it any way I feel like. It’s my convertible,” retorted McGuire.
Haledjian turned down the volume. For the rest of the drive to headquarters he
thoughtfully reviewed the case.
The Chicago National Bank had been held up four days ago, and more than half a million
dollars was stolen. One of the holdup men, according to the Chicago Police Department’s
informer, was Billy McGuire, a young ex-convict. The informer said McGuire had headed
straight for Miami in a green convertible after the crime.
That morning the convertible had been spotted in the driveway of a big-time Florida
gambler. The gambler swore the youth had been living with him in Miami for two months, and
therefore couldn’t have taken part in a Chicago robbery.
A search of the gambler’s home disclosed McGuire’s summer clothing in the guest room,
and throughout the house a typical amount of underworld luxury, including a connoisseur’s
collection of popular records. But none of the stolen money.
“You’re wastin’ your time, Gordon,” taunted McGuire. “Hey—tune up the radio. That’s the
Dixie Bobcats. Ain’t they the greatest?”
“Like popular music, do you?” inquired Haledjian.
“I like a lot of things. Especially this Florida climate,” sneered McGuire.
“Enjoy it while you can,” answered Haledjian.
Is McGuire guilty of robbing the Chicago National Bank? Explain using CEW.
“Try the manual dial,” suggested Dr. Haledjian, after Captain
Gordon of the Miami police had punched all the push buttons
of the radio and had got only static.
Immediately, music pored out noisily.
“Do you always play the radio so loud?” snapped
Gordon at the pale youth riding handcuffed in the rear seat of
the car.
“I play it any way I feel like. It’s my convertible,”
retorted McGuire.
Haledjian turned down the volume. For the rest of the
drive to headquarters he thoughtfully reviewed the case.
The Chicago National Bank had been held up four days
ago, and more than half a million dollars was stolen. One of
the holdup men, according to the Chicago Police Department’s
informer, was Billy McGuire, a young ex-convict. The informer
said McGuire had headed straight for Miami in a green
convertible after the crime.
That morning the convertible had been spotted in the
driveway of a big-time Florida gambler. The gambler swore
the youth had been living with him in Miami for two months,
and therefore couldn’t have taken part in a Chicago robbery.
A search of the gambler’s home disclosed McGuire’s
summer clothing in the guest room, and throughout the house
a typical amount of underworld luxury, including a
connoisseur’s collection of popular records. But none of the
stolen money.
“You’re wastin’ your time, Gordon,” taunted McGuire.
“Hey—tune up the radio. That’s the Dixie Bobcats. Ain’t they
the greatest?”
“Like popular music, do you?” inquired Haledjian.
“I like a lot of things. Especially this Florida climate,”
sneered McGuire.
“Enjoy it while you can,” answered Haledjian.
Is McGuire guilty of robbing the Chicago National Bank?
Explain using CEW.
Claim:
Evidence
Warrant
Claim:
McGuire is guilty of robbing the Chicago National Bank.
Evidence
Warrant
McGuire is described as a “pale
If McGuire had been living with his friend in Florida for two months,
youth”, yet he and his big time
chances are he would have some color-he wouldn’t be pale. He
gambler friend from Florida claimed would probably have a tan—or burn.
that McGuire had been “living with
him in Miami for two months.”
The push buttons on the radio had
not been adjusted to any Florida
radio station. All Gordon got when
he pushed the buttons was static.
If McGuire had been living in Florida for two months, he would have
programed the radio stations in his car at some point. Especially
being a music “connoisseur”. The static stations suggest that the
radio was tuned to Chicago stations, not Florida.
When Mr. Newman, the new fifth-grade teacher, picked up
the papers that his students had piled on the corner of his
desk as they finished their exams and left the room, he had
no time to look at them. When he examined them later, he
saw that these two were almost exactly alike, and it was
obvious that one of them had been copied. Since Mr.
Newman was new to the class (he was subbing for Mr.
Ailing, who was sick), he did not know whether Charles
Starrs, who wrote paper A, or Ulric Betcher, who wrote paper
B, copied the test.
Can you tell who copied whom? Write your claim down on
your chart. Then, list the items of evidence on which you
base your decision. Finally, in the warrant column, explain
how each piece of evidence supports your claim of who
copied from whom.
When Mr. Newman, the new fifth-grade
teacher, picked up the papers that his
students had piled on the corner of his
desk as they finished their exams and left
the room, he had no time to look at them.
When he examined them later, he saw
that these two were almost exactly alike,
and it was obvious that one of them had
been copied. Since Mr. Newman was
new to the class (he was subbing for Mr.
Ailing, who was sick), he did not know
whether Charles Starrs, who wrote paper
A, or Ulric Betcher, who wrote paper B,
copied the test.
Can you tell who copied whom? Write
your claim down on your chart. Then, list
the items of evidence on which you base
your decision. Finally, in the warrant
column, explain how each piece of
evidence supports your claim of who
copied from whom.
Claim:
Evidence
Warrant
Can you tell who copied whom?
Claim:
“B” copied from “A”
Evidence
Warrant
A, unlike B, wrote without
stopping. B stopped in the middle
of words like “because” and
“buying”.
B stopping in the middle of common words like “because” and
“buying” suggests that s/he needed to have another look at what
s/he was copying and paused at those words. Usually, writers do
not space out those words.
A crossed out some words (or the
beginning of words) as if s/he had
a better idea. B wrote without
changing his/her mind, but with
the same ideas as A.
A’s crossed out words shows some of the thought process that
went into the response, and sometimes thinking things through is
a messy process.
A’s paper ends nicely without
spelling errors, whereas B’s paper
ends with the same ideas, but
spelling errors.
Because the spelling errors don’t happen until the last lines of the
response, this hints that B knew what to say, but can’t always spell
correctly. However, there are no other earlier spelling errors, so
these seem suspicious.
A’s writing is bigger than B’s but
each ends with the same word.
B was copying word-for-word and that also included the
formatting of his/her answers. As a person with smaller writing, it
would be expected that s/he would go to the edge of the paper
when writing, not stop early.
Barbecue Murder
“Bill would have met your train himself, Dr. Haledjian,” said Nora Perkins. “But since I was in
town, he asked me to pick you up. He wanted more time to prepare the barbecue.”
Bill Perkins, however, was past worrying about barbecues when Haledjian and his hostess
arrived at the house half an hour later. Nora shrieked. Her husband lay on the lawn, a knife
protruding from his chest.
A hasty examination indicated to Haledjian that the killing had occurred about an hour before.
He studied the scene.
A half cooked steak lay above flameless coals banked in a stone barbecue pit. Upon an iron
shelf were a tray of condiments and a long-handled knife and fork.
“Who are you?” demanded Haledjian as a young man burst through the woods.
“Ed Magden. My house is about a hundred yards back there. I heard a shriek—what’s
happened?
“Where were you an hour ago?” inquired Haledjian.
“Over at the boat yard. I’d just entered my driveway when I heard a shriek,” replied Magden.
“Here—what’s this?”
Magden pointed to a metallic object partly buried under the coals. With a quick stride, he
reached the pit, thrust in his hand, and pulled out a charred earring.
“Why, it’s mine,” gasped Nora. Suddenly her expression hardened. “Ed Magden, you hated
Bill. What are you trying to do?”
“You hated him more than anyone,” snapped Ed Magden
“You hated enough to kill,” Haledjian said to-Who was Haledjian talking to? How did he know that person was guilty? Explain using CEW.
Claim:
Haledjian was talking to Ed Magden.
Evidence
Warrant
Ed said that he just arrived, yet he
almost immediately saw
something in the barbecue pit and
“With a quick stride, he reached
the pit, thrust in his hand, and
pulled out a charred earring.”
If he had just arrived, as he claimed, how would he know that the
barbecue pit coals were cool enough for him to put his hand in
among them? Only someone who knew that Bill had been dead
and the barbecue was cool would have done that. The earring was
planted to throw suspicion on Nora.

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