Arithmetic Logic Units

Report
EET 252
Digital Systems II
Professor Nick Reeder
Reminders
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Please turn off cell phones.
No food or soft drinks in the
classroom.
Stow water bottles at floor level.
EET 252 Unit 1
Review; Arithmetic Logic Units
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Review Floyd, Chapter 2 and Chapters
6 to 9.
Study Unit 1 e-Lesson.
Do Lab #1.
Homework #1 and Lab #1 due next
week.
Quiz next week.
Overview of This Week’s Lecture
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Unused Inputs
Pull-up Resistors
Review of Logical Operations
Review of Arithmetic Operations
Arithmetic Logic Units
Unused Gate Inputs
(Floyd, p. 143)
Tying Other Inputs HIGH or LOW
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The same rules apply to other input
pins (such as enable inputs).
To force them HIGH, tie them to VCC
through a 1-kΩ resistor for TTL.
To force them LOW, tie them to
ground.
But what about the Trainer’s Data
Switches?
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When you connect a TTL input pin to
one of the trainer’s data switches and
set the switch to HIGH, do you need a
1−kΩ resistor between the switch and
the input pin?
From the Trainer’s Schematic
Diagram
Don’t Tie Outputs HIGH or LOW
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Remember that, in general, unused
output pins should be left
unconnected. Do not tie them HIGH
or LOW.
Overview of This Week’s Lecture
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Unused Inputs
Pull-up Resistors
Review of Logical Operations
Review of Arithmetic Operations
Arithmetic Logic Units
Pull-Up Resistor
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A pull-up resistor is a resistor with
one end connected to a HIGH voltage
level and the other end connected to a
point in a digital circuit.
The resistor’s purpose is to pull up the
voltage at that point to a HIGH level
when it would otherwise be in a float
condition (not HIGH or LOW).
Pull-Up Resistor (Continued)
Three common uses of pull-up
resistors:
1. On a switch connected to an input pin.
2. When interfacing two logic families
that use different voltage levels.
3. On open-collector outputs (TTL) or
open-drain outputs (CMOS).
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First Use for Pull-Up Resistor: Switch
on an Input Pin
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Good explanation at
http://www.seattlerobotics.org/encoder
/mar97/basics.html
See also example on next slide from
your textbook.
Figure 6.42 A simplified keyboard encoder. (Floyd, p. 316)
Digital Fundamentals, Tenth Edition
Thomas L. Floyd
Copyright ©2009 by Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458
All rights reserved.
Second Use for Pull-Up Resistor:
Interfacing Logic Families
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Suppose we want to connect the output
of a TTL gate to the input of a CMOS
gate.
A TTL HIGH output may be as low as
2.4 V.
But CMOS expects at least 3.3 V for a
HIGH.
Problem: The CMOS gate may interpret
the TTL gate’s HIGH output as a LOW.
Solution? See next slide.
Figure 9–27 Using a pull-up resistor to interface TTL to CMOS.
Digital Electronics: A Practical Approach, Eighth Edition
William Kleitz
Copyright ©2008 by Pearson Education, Inc.
Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458
All rights reserved.
Third Use for Pull-Up Resistor: Open
Collector Outputs
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As we’ll see next week, some TTL gates
are intentionally designed with a
missing transistor on the output. To
work properly, such an output needs an
external pull-up resistor.
One of the output pins on the chip in
tonight’s lab is an open-collector
output, and therefore needs a pull-up
resistor.
Figure 14.31 TTL inverter with open-collector output.
Digital Fundamentals, Tenth Edition
Thomas L. Floyd
Copyright ©2009 by Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458
All rights reserved.
Overview of This Week’s Lecture
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Unused Inputs
Pull-up Resistors
Review of Logical Operations
Review of Arithmetic Operations
Arithmetic Logic Units
How Many Logical Operations?
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You already know how to perform
some logical operations on two input
bits, A and B. Examples:
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X = AB
X = A+B
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Question: How many possible logical
operations are there on two input bits?
How Many Logical Ops? (Continued)
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A
B
0
0
0
1
1
0
1
1
Let’s list them all:
Overview of This Week’s Lecture
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Unused Inputs
Pull-up Resistors
Review of Logical Operations
Review of Arithmetic Operations
Arithmetic Logic Units
Overview of This Week’s Lecture
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Unused Inputs
Pull-up Resistors
Review of Logical Operations
Review of Arithmetic Operations
Arithmetic Logic Units
Arithmetic Logic Unit (ALU)
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Central to any computer system is its
ALU, which performs mathematical
and logical operations on data.
In modern systems, the ALU is
contained on the computer’s
microprocessor chip. (See next slide,
or Figure 13-3 on p. 724 of Floyd.)
In older systems, the ALU was a
separate chip, such as the 74181.
Figure 13.3
Digital Fundamentals, Tenth Edition
Thomas L. Floyd
Copyright ©2009 by Pearson Higher Education, Inc.
Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458
All rights reserved.
74181 ALU chip
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Can perform 16 logical operations (bitby-bit) and 16 arithmetic operations
on two four-bit input numbers.
Data Sheet shows two truth tables:
Table 1 if you’re considering data
inputs & outputs to be active-low, and
Table 2 if you’re considering data
inputs & outputs to be active-high.
Data Sheet: 74LS181
Positive Logic versus Negative Logic
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Any gate or logic circuit can be looked
at from either an active-HIGH
perspective (“positive logic”) or an
active-LOW perspective (“negative
logic”).
Example: The gates on a 7408 chip
can be considered either positive-AND
gates or negative-OR gates.
Data Sheet: 7408
74181 ALU (Continued)
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Caution: In the “Arithmetic
Operations” columns of the 74181
truth tables, the + symbol always
means logical OR, not addition. The
word “PLUS” is used for addition.
74181 ALU (Continued)
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Fourteen Input Pins:
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M is the mode pin (arithmetic or logic).
S0 to S3 select the operation performed.
Cn is the carry-in bit, used only during
arithmetic ops (ignored during logic ops).
A0 to A3 form one of the 4-bit inputs.
B0 to B3 form the other 4-bit input.
74181 ALU (Continued)
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Eight Output Pins:
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F0 to F3 form the 4-bit output.
Cn=4 is carry-out bit, meaningful only for
arithmetic ops. (Ignore it for logic ops.)
A=B is comparison bit, meaningful only
when performing “A MINUS B” operation.
(Ignore it for all other ops.)
P and G are carry-look-ahead bits for
high-speed arithmetic, when 74181 is
used in conjunction with 74182 chip.
(We’ll ignore these.)

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