PREPARING FOR A SUCCESSFUL TRANSITION

Report
HEARTH AMENDMENTS TO THE
MCKINNEY-VENTO ACT –
PREPARING FOR A SUCCESSFUL
TRANSITION
Stacey Murphy
Bridget Kurtt DeJong
HEARTH OVERVIEW
Key changes introduced by HEARTH:

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New CoC structure and governance
New program activities and requirements
One set of rules for SHP, S+C, and SRO Mod Rehab
New CoC performance outcomes
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WHERE YOUR COC IS AT
In order to think through how your Continuum of Care
is going to implement HEARTH, it is essential to
understand where you’re at right now, what your
strengths and weaknesses are, and how best to direct
your energy and resources in the coming months.
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EXERCISE 1: PREPAREDNESS CHECKLIST
Take the next 10 minutes to complete the brief CoC
Preparedness Checklist.
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EXERCISE 1: READINESS CHECKLIST
What are your Continuum’s strengths?
Where are your biggest challenges?
Which of the HEARTH transition issues do you think
will be most beneficial (and/or difficult) for your
community?
WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR NEXT STEPS IN
THINKING THROUGH WHERE YOUR
CONTINUUM IS AT?
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COC STRUCTURE

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Governing body or central structure of current
“Continuum of Care” will be replaced by
“Collaborative Applicant” (or “CA”) and carry
additional responsibilities.
CA can receive 3% for added
administrative/oversight activities.
CA can add responsibilities and receive up to 6% as
a “Unified Funding Agency” (or “UFA”)
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MAP OF THE OLD TO NEW SYSTEM:
TWO OPTIONS
Option 1:
CoC
A Few New
Responsibiliti
es
Collaborative
Applicant
Grantee
Responsibilit
ies
Unified
Fundin
g
Agency
Option 2:
Collaborati
ve
Applicant
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COLLABORATIVE APPLICANT

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Collaborative Applicant:
 Submits CoC application for all projects in its
community
 Is not required to be a legal entity
 Can receive up to 3% of a community’s CoC grant
to cover its costs
Conflict of Interest: No board member of a CA may
participate in decisions concerning an award to her
or her organization
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DUTIES OF A COLLABORATIVE APPLICANT
Submits a single application for the grant.
a)
Designs collaborative process to apply for
funding,
b)
Evaluates outcomes,
c)
Determines compliance with program
requirements and selection criteria, and
d)
Establishes funding priorities.
2. Participates in the Consolidated Plan.
3. Ensures operation of and consistent participation
in HMIS.
Summary: Much of what CoCs currently do, but with
additional roles and responsibilities added.
1.
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UNIFIED FUNDING AGENCY
Becoming a Unified Funding Agency:


A CA can apply to serve as a UFA
or
HUD can designate a CA as a UFA if
 the CA has capacity
 the change would serve the purposes of HEARTH
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UNIFIED FUNDING AGENCY

In addition to the CA duties, a UFA:
o Receives and distributes funds from HUD
o Requires each project to establish proper fiscal
control and fund accounting procedures
o Arranges for an annual audit of the financial
records of each project
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UNIFIED FUNDING AGENCY
A UFA can receive up to 6% of a community’s CoC
grant to cover the administrative costs of performing
these duties
Summary: UFA takes on CA duties PLUS other key
tasks related to grant management and oversight
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THINGS TO THINK ABOUT: GEOGRAPHY
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Improving partnerships with Con Plan bodies and
Education Coordinator
Meeting additional data collection and outcome
tracking requirements
o Merging may increase competitiveness
Administrative capacity
UFA duties may require an economy of scale
o Consider current grant administrators in
community
o Consider CoC mergers to achieve greater
efficiency
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THINGS TO THINK ABOUT:
CURRENT STAKEHOLDERS
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Changing roles
Data driven
Evaluation
Monitoring
Centralization (esp. UFA)
Current authority or decision-making within the CoC
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EXERCISE 2: CA/UFA MODELS
Take the next 15 minutes to look at the different
models for Collaborative Applicants and/or Unified
Funding Agencies. If possible, fill in the entities
who would play the particular roles in the chart.
Do any of them make particular sense for your
community?
Is there a different model that would work better?
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EXERCISE 2: CA/UFA MODELS
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What work will your community need to do to
become a CA/UFA?
Where are there blank spaces on your charts?
What barriers or opportunities are you
anticipating?
WHAT ARE YOUR COMMUNITY’S “TO-DO” ITEMS
THAT EMERGE FROM THIS EXERCISE?
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POTENTIAL AREAS NEEDING ADDED CAPACITY
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Each CA/UFA will need to be collecting more
information than it does now
(Detail on new outcomes measures – pending
regulations)
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POTENTIAL AREAS NEEDING ADDED CAPACITY: HMIS
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HMIS will need to be more robust to meet data
standards
HMIS oversee by CA/UFA – new roles and
responsibilities for all parties
(Detail on new outcomes measures – pending
regulations)
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POTENTIAL AREAS NEEDING ADDED CAPACITY: GRANTS
TRANSITION
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Pre-HEARTH/McK-V, grants made through different
programs with nonstandard requirements/structures.
HEARTH combines SHP, S+C, and Section 8 SRO
Mod Rehab into one CoC program, with uniform
requirements/activities.
Implication: Increased competition among local
providers
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POTENTIAL AREAS NEEDING ADDED CAPACITY:
MATCH
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Under HEARTH, CoCs must demonstrate 25%
match for all activities except leasing and
administration, which require no match.
Match calculated on a Continuum-wide, not projectby-project, basis.
Match can be provided via in-kind contribution
when Memorandum of Agreement formalizes
availability/relationship.
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EXERCISE 3: OTHER TRANSITION ISSUES
Take the next 15 minutes to start to outline your
HEARTH transition plan around each of these
activities.
Who can be the lead on these different activities?
Where do you need more resources?
What stumbling blocks can you identify?
What solutions come to mind?
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EXERCISE 3: OTHER TRANSITION ISSUES
What are your “To-Do” list items that emerge from this
activity?
What other information do you need to start your
transition?
Who else must participate in the discussion?
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QUESTIONS?
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Contact Stacey Murphy:
415-788-7961 ext 302
[email protected]
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